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Full text of "School of Medicine Catalog 1924-1932"

VOL. DC JULY, 1924 NO. 1 

OmCIAL PUBUCATION 

OF THE 

llNIVERSin OF MARYLAND. 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 




ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1924-1925. 



PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR 

JANUARY, APRIL, JULY AND OCTOBER 

LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Post Office^at 
Baltimore. Maryland, under the Act of August,24-I912a_ 



INDEX 



Alumni Association 74 

Annual Hospital Appointments 68 

Board of Instruction 6 

Board of Regents 4 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medicine. 62 

Consolidation of Schools 12 

Curriculum, Organization of 32 

Anatomy 83 

Histology and Embryology 83 

Physiology 34 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica ... 85 

Pathology 37 

Bacteriology and Immunology 38 

Bio-Chemistry 38 

Medicine 39 

Clinical Pathology 41 

Gastro-Enterology 42 

Psychiatry 43 

Pediatrics 43 

Neurology 44 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. ... 45 

Surgery 46 

Anaesthesia 49 

Roentgenology and R.-T 50 

• Throat and Nose 50 

Genitro-Urinary 51 

Colon and Rectum 52 

Obstetrics 52 

Gynecology 53 

Opthalmology and Otology 54 

Dispensary Reports : 

Mercy Hospital 26 

University Hospital 20 

, Clinical Facilities : 

Mercy Hospital 21 

University Hospital 15 



Dispensary Staffs : 

Mercy Hospital 24 

University Hospital 18 

Endowment Fund 75 

Expenses, Students' 68 

Fees 63 

Graduates 73 

General Summary of Students 72 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 28 

Mercy Hospital 21 

Municipal Hospital 26 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

for the Insane, The 30 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 30 

University Hospital 15 

Libraries 81 

Matriculates 69 

Medical Council 6 

Post-Graduate Students 62 

Prizes 66 

Prizemen 74 

Requirements for Matriculation 59 

Rules 63 

Schedule 55 

Scholarships 65 

Staffs: 

City Hospital at Bay View 27 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital .... 28 

Mercy Hospital 21 

University Hospital 16 

Training School for Nurses : 

Mercy Hospital 82 

University Hospital 76 

University Council 4 

University of Maryland, Organization of 3 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/medicine24unse 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore Medical College News, and the Jour- 
nal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 

VOL. IX. JULY, 1924 NO. 1 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 
SESSION 1924-1925. 



CALENDAR 



1924- 1925 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

1924 

September 22 to 27, Inc. — Examinations for advanced standing. 

September 29 — Last day for registration. 

September 29 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

November 11 — Armistice Day. 

November 27 — Holiday (Thanksgiving Day). 

December 20 — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

1925 

January 5 — Instructions resumed with the first scheduled period. 

February 23 — Holiday (Washington's Birthday, February 22). 

April 9 — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

April 14 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

June 6 — Commencement Day. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of 
nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for terms of nine years each. The general administration 
of the University is vested in the President. The University 
Council is an advisory body, composed of the President, the 
Assistant to the President, the Director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and 
the Deans. The University Council acts upon all matters having 
relation to the University as a whole, or to co-operative work 
between the constituent groups. Each school has its own Faculty 
Council, composed of the Dean and members of its Faculty; 
each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs of the group it 
represents. 

The University has the follov/ing educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation, 

The College of Commerce and Business Admiinistration. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Com- 
merce are located in Baltimore: the others in College Park, Marj^- 
land. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman Term expires 1925 

Robert Grain, Esq .Term expires 1933 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer.. Term expires 1932 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow Term expires 1931 

John E. Raine, Esq... ..Term expires 1930 

G. G. Gelder, Esq .Term expires 1929 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary Term expires 1928 

B. John Black, Esq. Term expires 1927 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq .Term expires 1926 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., President and Executive Officer. 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

Albert F. Woods, A.M., D. Agr., LL.D... President 

H. G. Byrd, B.S Assistant to the President 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S Dean of the Gollege of Agriculture 

A. N. Johnson, S.B Dean of the Gollege of Engineering 

Frederick E. Lee, Ph.D Dean of the Gollege of Arts and Sciences 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D Dean of the School of Law 

J, M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Head of Department of Information 

H. F. Gotterman, M.S Dean of the Gollege of Education 

M. Marie Mount, A.B Acting Dean of the Gollege of Home Economics 

G. O. Appleman, Ph.D. Dean of the Graduate School 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Director of the Experiment Station 

Thomas, B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

M. A. Glemens, A.M Director School of Gommerce 

and Business Administration 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 



MEDICAL COUNCIL. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D. 

BARTGIS McGLONE, A.B., Ph.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B-, M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 



6 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D, L.L.D Opthalmology and Otology 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D Psychiatry 

A. C. Pole, M.D Anatomy 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Clinical Medicine 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D Obstetrics 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Gary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D,, Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J, M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S. B., M. D., Professor cf Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology 

George W. Dobbin, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 

and Colon. 
W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

TiLGHMAN B. Marden. A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of CHnical Gynecology. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Jos. E.GiCHNER,M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics. 
Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and CHnical Psychiatry. 
C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM., (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene 

and Public Health. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 7 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology, 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

Andrew C Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Nose 
and Throat. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Abraham Samuels, M. D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

GeorgeW. Mitchell, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

C. C. CoNSER, M.D,, Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

G. M . Settle, A.B ., M . D . , Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

O. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

John Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Roentgenology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 



8 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

Wm. J. Carson, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Sidney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Associate Professor of Opthalmology. 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

W. F. Zinn, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Nose and Throat. 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

C. L. JOSLIN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Theodore Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

Geo. a. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 

George Murgatroyd, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Sam'l W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 

Frank J. Kirby, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

W. I. Messick, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

George McLean, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Paul J. Ew^rhardt, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

H. S. GORSUCH, M. D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

W. H. Toulson, M.D. Associate in Urology. 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Associate in Surgery and Radio-therapy. 

Wm. H. Ingram, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

H. H. Warner, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

F. A. Ries, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

E. E. Ma\'ER, M. D., Instructor in Medicine. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
Harris Goldman, M.D., Instructor in Urology. 

D. CORBIN Streett, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

E. S .Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
H. M. Foster, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Firmadge K. Nichols, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

Milford Levy, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

J. W. Martindale, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Wm. J. Todd, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

John F. Traband, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wm. F. Geyer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Joseph P. Pokorny, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

A. E. Goldstein, M.D., Instructor in Patholog>\ 

M. J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Pathology and Surgery. 

J. G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

George A. Knipp, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Stanley W. Matthews, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics and Histology. 

Louis C. Dobihal, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

J. D. Holofcener, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

J. F. Hogan, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

J. Albert Key, B.A., M.D , Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. R. LiCKLE, M.D., x\ssistant in Pediatrics. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

G. W. Bowden, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
F. H. Machin, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

DwiGHT MoHR, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

W. R. Geraghty, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Jack M. Hundley, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Surgery. 

0. H. Lloyd, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Clyde N. Marvel, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
EvERARD Briscoe, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Anatomy. 
SusANNE Parsons, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
N. J. Davidov, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
Albert Eisenberg, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
M. Koppelman, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
Paul Foreman Wiest, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
George E. Wells, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Wetkerbee Fort, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Herman Seidel, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

E. C. Reitzel, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Clarence E. Macxe, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
H. Whitney V/keaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Robert S. Kirk, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. J. Dorf, M,D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
D. H. Lawler, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

1. S. Zinberg, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
W. E. Grempler, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
Wm. Michel, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

M. G. GlCHNER, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. H. COLLINSON, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

J. Ogle V/arfield, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Physiology. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

R. B. Wright, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Frank Pacienza, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

H. L. Rogers, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

D. T. Pessagno, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. M. Pfeiffer, M.D., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

L. L. GoRDY, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

W. L. Brent, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

J. J. McGorrell, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

F. B. Smith, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

L. L. GoRDY, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

R. J. Kemp, M.D., Assitant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

and 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institu- 
tions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Balti- 
more Medical College, the entire equipment of three large medical 
colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, rank- 
ing fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United 
States. It was chartered in 1807, under the name of the College 
of Medicine of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 
1810. In 1812 the College was empowered by the Legislature 
to annex three other colleges or faculties, of Divinity, of Law, and 
of Arts and Sciences, and the four colleges thus united were "con- 
stituted an University by the name and under the title of the 
University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland has always been a leading 
medical college, especially prominent in the South and widely 
known and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure in America devoted 
to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837), and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867) and 
of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 



12 ORGANIZATION 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 
hospital, and in this hospital intramural residency for the senior 
student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, an institution of 32 years' growth. By this associa- 
tion the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in fac- 
ulty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated under 
the Legislative enactment in 1872, and established on Hanover 
Street in a building afterwards known as the Maternite, the first 
obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was affected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence 
since 1827, and the College was removed to its present location 
at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this arrangement medical 
control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was ob- 
tained, and on this foundation in 1899 the present admirable 
college building was erected. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE. 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES. 
THE LABORATORIES. 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of build- 
ings at Greene and Lombard Sts., and the Building at Calvert 
and Saratoga Sts. The schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory 
periods are placed with a view of obviating unnecessary move- 
ment on the part of the classes. The building known as Gray 
Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Sts., houses three depart- 
ments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top floor, 
where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric light- 
ing gives adequate illuinination of the subjects. On this floor are 
the oflice of the department and the necessary preparation rooms. 
The Department of Pharmacology occupies the second floor. 
There is a large room for the general student laboratory, which 
is thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and 
in addition contains many instruments of unique and original 
design. With oflice and stock-room adjoining, this laboratory is 



ORGANIZATION 13 

complete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray 
Laboratory is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the 
large student laboratory, which is constructed for sections of 
forty-five students, there are rooms for the departmental office, 
preparation of material, and storage of apparatus. An additional 
room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experiments. In this 
building there is maintained an animal room where is kept an 
abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalm- 
ing and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physi- 
cal connection with the building and its special department. The 
laboratories of physiology and pharmacology are completely 
equipped with apparatus lockers so that in accord with the best 
ideas of instruction, the students work in groups of two each, and 
each group has sufficient apparatus so that the experimental work 
can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general stock- 
room. 

The laboratories of Pathology and Biochemistry are located on 
the third floor of the Dental Building. The former department 
has a large student laboratory with a capacity of ninety; the 
tables are so placed as to secure the most satisfactory illumina- 
tion for microscopic work, in addition, all of the tables are elec- 
trically equipped for substage illumination. This equipment is 
also provided for all laboratories where microscopic work obtains. 
The museum of the Department of Pathology adjoins the student 
laboratory. Here are available for demonstration about fifteen 
hundred carefully prepared and mounted specimens, and for 
laboratory instruction and study two hundred histories and ma- 
terial from autopsies. Several preparation, research, and office 
rooms communicate with the other rooms of this department. 
The laboratory of Biochemistry is constructed and equipped for 
sections of fifty. The laboratory is completely equipped for the 
facihtation of work. The office and stock-room adjoin. In the 
Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged 
for student reference specimens which represent the careful selec- 
tion of material over a period of many years. In the University 
Hospital is the Student Laboratory for the analytical studies of 
those students who are serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A 
similar laboratory is maintained in the building at the N. W. cor- 
ner of Saratoga and Calvert Sts., for the student work on the 
wards of the Mercy Hospital. 



14 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

In this latter building are two laboratories for Bacteriology, 
Histology, and Clinical Pathology, and an additional dissecting 
room which is used for the course in Topographical Anatomy. 
The two large laboratories accommodate ninety students or the full 
class, and are equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes 
and apparatus. Each of the departments housed in this building 
are provided with their individual offices, preparation, and stock- 
rooms. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES. 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of the 
sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 1823, 
under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that time con- 
sisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved for eye cases. 

The present hospital has a capacity of 275 beds devoted to 
general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical and 
surgical specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly m.odern 
X-ray department and clinical laboratory, and a postmortem 
building which is constructed with special reference to the in- 
struction of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings 
so that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture halls 
and laboratories to the chnical amphitheater, dispensary and 
wards. 

Owing to its situation being adjacent to the largest manufac- 
turing district of the city and the shipping district, large numbers 
of accident cases are received. These combined with the cases of 
many sick seamen and with patients from our own city furnish a 
large amount of clinical material. Accommodations for thirty 
obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital for the purpose 
of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each member of the 
graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door obstet- 
rical clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful pre- 
natal supervision, is attended during labor by a physician and 
graduate nurse — one senior student also being present — and is 
visited during the puerperium by the attending student and grad- 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 15 

uate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor and puerperal records are 
kept, making this work of extreme value to the medical student, 
not only from the obstetrical standpoint, but in making him ap- 
preciate the value of social service and public health work. 

During the year ending May 31, 1924, 421 cases were delivered 
in the hospital and 867 cases in the out-door department. Each 
student in the graduating class delivered an average of fifteen 
cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and 
the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order 
that the teaching may be the same in each. Each dispensary has 
the following departments: Medicine, Surgery, Children, Eye 
and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurol- 
ogy, Orthopaedics, Proctology, Dermatology, Throat and Nose, 
Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special depart- 
ments one hour each day. 



16 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL. 

Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean. 

M. C. PiNCOFFS, S.B., M.D., Head of Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of Department of Surgery. 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, President of Board of Regents. 

J. Allison Muir, 

G. M. Shriver, 

W. B. Brooks, 

Mrs. Edward Shoemaker, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff. 
Page Edmunds, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni 
Charles Bagley, M.D. G. Milton Linthicum, M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

Physicians. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Charles W. McElfresh M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Paul W. Clough, M.D. Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 

Gastro-Evterologists. 
Julius Friedenwald, A. M., M.D. John C. Hemmeter, Ph.D., M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 



R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Pathologists. 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 

S, Lloyd Johnson, M.D. W. J. Carson, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 17 

Surgeons. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
Jor.EPH W. Holland, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Laryngologist. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D, 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons. 
Page Edmunds, M.D. W. H. Toulson, M.S., M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Henry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Anaesthetists. 
S. Griffith Davis, M.D. W. G. Queen, M.D- 

Obstetricians. 
L. E. Neale, M.D. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Dldley Pleasants Bowe, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

William Tarun, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 
J. Mason Hundley, M. D. W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

Hugh Brent, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 



18 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

RESIDENT STAFF. 

Reddent Physician. 
Dr. Wm. S. Love, Jr. 

Resident Surgeon. 
Dr. M. Edwards. 

Assistant Resident Surgeon. 
Dr. W. W. Walker. 

Assistant Resident Surgeon. 
Dr. W. W. Wilson. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Dr. M. Alexander Novey. 



Dr. H. E. Dean 
Dr. a. L. Anderson 
Dr. Roy A. Bell 
Dr. C. a. Davenport 
Dr. Jas. T. Marsh 
Dr. M. Virginia Beyer 



INTERNES 

Dr. T. B. Aycock 
Dr. R. S. Anderson 
Dr. T. a. Clawson 
Dr. D. Allen Fields 
Dr. B. p. Warren 
Dr. Edwin M. Robertson 
Accident Room Service. 
Dr. T. B. Whaley. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

Medicine. 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
H. M. BuBERT, M.D. RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. 

G. L. Zimmerman, M.D. L. L. Gordy, M.D. 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D. William Michel, M.D. 

D. CoRBiN Strett, M.D. A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D. 



Diseases of Stomach and Intestine, 
J. H. Ullrich, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 



Joseph Sindler, M.D. 
Z. Morgan, M.D. 



M S Koppelman, M.D. 
N. J. Davidov, M.D. 



Paul F. Wiest, M.D. 



Pediatrics. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
W. H. Ingram, M.D. J. H. Traband, M.D. 

H. H. Warner, M.D. W. G. Geyer, M.D. 

B. J. Ferry, M. D. H. W. Wheaton, M.D. 

W. J. Todd, M.D. R. S. Kirk, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 19 

C. R. GoLDSBOROUGH, M.D. C. E. Macke, M.D. 

G. E. Wells, M.D. H. J. Dorf, M.D. 

E. C. Reitzel, M. D. ' D. H Lawler, M.D. 

F. S. Orem, M.D. H. R. Lickle, M.D. 
F. B. Smith. M,D. G. A. Knipp, M.D. 

W. L. Brent, M.D. J. J. McGarrell, M.D. 

Neurology, 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic, 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. B. Pushkin, M.D. 

Psychiatry. 
R. M. Chapman, M. D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
Paul J. Ewerhardt, M.D. H. M. Pfeiffer, M.D. 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D. 

Tuberculosis. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

H. M. Foster, M.D. E. S. Johnson, M.D. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. W. R. Johnson, M.D 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. James Brown, M.D. 

W. K. Harryman, M.D. S. H. Culver, M.D. 

C. F. HoRiNE, M.D. William D. Noble, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

R. TUNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, 

Compton Riely,M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

J. A. Key, B.A., M.D. 

Genito-Urinary. 
W. H. TOULSON, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Harris Goldman, M.D. H. T. Collenberg, M.D. 

J. H. Collinson, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D. H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

X-Ray. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Roentgenologist, 

Dermatology. 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. E. Gately, M.D. J. A. Buchness, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

Gynecology. 
R. G. WiLLSE, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. George L. Wissig, M.D. 

Obstetrics. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Dudley Pleasants Bov/e, B.A., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Stanley G. Mathews, M.D. 

Eye and Ear. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

H. L. SiNSKY, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Nose and Throat. 

E. A. LooPER, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Frank B. Anderson, Chief of Clinic. 

George Murgatroyd, M.D. Charles J. Norton, M.D. 

J. G. Alexander, M.D. 

Social Service. 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, DISPENSARY REPORT 

January 1, 1923, to December 31, 1923 

^ Cases ^ 

Department New Old Total 

Pedriatrics 2,111 13,676 15,787 

Dermatology 2,874 4,366 7,240 

Medical 1,382 3,691 5,073 

Obstetrics 1,448 3,937 5,385 

Surgical 1,703 5^685 7,388 

Ophthalmology 672 1,397 2,069 

Gynecology 1,006 2,013 3,019 

Orthopedics 283 2,645 2,928 

Nose and Throat 738 1,047 1,785 

Neurology 193 945 1,138 

Gastro-Enterology 181 811 992 

Tuberculosis 178 235 413 

Proctology 90 104 194 

Psychiatric 76 74 150 

Cystoscopy 57 140 197 

Dental 25 13 38 

Genito-Urinary 2,856 6,249 9,105 



15,873 47,028 62,901 



MERCY HOSPITAL 21 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Wash- 
ington University, in 1875. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital 
came under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
but the Sisters continued their work of administering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the 
rapidly growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 
1888 that the Sisters of Mercy ,with the assistance of the Faculty 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the 
cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building was completed 
and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing demands for 
more space has compelled the erection of additions, until now 
there are accommodations for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name v/as changed from The Baltimore City Hos- 
pital to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 800,000 
inhabitants. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

It adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients from 
the public wards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates 
the clinical teaching, as there is no time lost in passing from one 
to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United RaiJw^ays and 
Electric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company and its branches. 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

SURGICAL DIVISION 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

C. F. Blake, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Elliot H. Hutchins, M.D. Harvey B. Stone, M.D. 

R. H. LocHER, M.D. A. M. Evans, M.D. 

Thomas R. Chambers, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 



22 - MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Assistant Surgeons. 
I. 0. RiDGLEY, M.D. F. X. Kearney, M.D. 

N. C. Marvel, M.D. Chas. Maxson, M.D. 

EvERARD Briscoe, M.D. H. B. McElwain, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Rhinologists and Laryngologists. 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologists and Laryngologists. 
W. F. ZiNN, M.D. Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

Proctologist. 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Associate. 
L. J. Rosenthal, M. D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate. 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologists. 
A. G. Rytina, M.D. A. J. Gillis, M.D. 

MEDICAL DIVISION. 

Physicians. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. Gary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. H. G. Beck, M.D. 

Associates. 
Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. E. E. Mayer, M.D. 

C. C. W. JuDD, M.D. Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 

J. W. Martindale, M.D. G. McLean, M.D. 

Leon Freedom, M.D. 

Assistant. 
H. R. Peters, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 
Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 23 

Associates, 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants, 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Pediatrists. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Assistant, 
F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist. 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Assistant. 
Milford Levy, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

Obstetricians, 

Geo. W. Dobbin, M.D. Charles E. Brack, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians. 
E. P. Smith, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Assistant Obstetrician, 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 
Gynecologists, 
William S. Gardner, M.D. Abraham Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists, 
T. K. Galvin, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Pathologists. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologist, 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D. 

Technicians — Sister M, Joan, Ph.G., R.N., Anna Chenoweth, R.N. 



24 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY 

Attending Dentists. 
NoRVAL McDonald, D.D.S. 
Le Roy Knoble, D.D.S. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographers. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF. 

K. W. GoLLEY, M.D., Chief Resident. 
Resident Surgeons. 



H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 



Theodore Giffen, M.D. 



M. I. Berkson, M.D. 

H. M. Beerman, M.D. 
D. J. Maurillo, M.D. 
Jacob M. Miller, M.D. 
Albert Scagnetti, M.D. 



Resident Gynecologist. 
T. J. TouHEY, M.D. 

Resident Physician. 
F. T. Kyper, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons. 
Internes. 



Leo H. Mynes, M.D. 



H. R. McConnell, M.D. 
Jos. G. Miller, M.D. 
Peter G. Motta, M.D. 
Edw. J. Whelan, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Surgery. 

Supervisors. 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons. 



A. M. Evans, M.D. 
D. H. MoHR, M.D. 
I. 0. Ridgely, M.D. 



0. H. Lloyd, M.D. 
Clyde Marvel, M.D. 
Everard Briscoe, M.D. 



H. B. McElwain, M.D. 

' Genito-Uriaary SurQeiy. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Medicine. 
Supervisors, Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D., M. C. PiNCOFFS, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 
Attending Physicians. 



25 



Herman Seidel, M.D. 
Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 
F. N. HiLLis, M.D. 



B. T. Baggott, M.D. 

F. M. ViLLELA, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. 



Diseases of Stomach. 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

M. Feldman, M.D. S. Zinberg, M.D. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. A. Eisenberg, M.D. 

E. E. Grempler, M.D. 
W. F. ZiNN, M.D. Esophagoscopist. 

Nervous Diseases. 
Supervisor, A. C. GiLLls. 



MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

E. P. Smith, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D. 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



Attending Physicians. 

Pediatrics. 
I. J. Feinglos, M.D. 

Diseases of Women. 
Supervisors. 

Attending Surgeons. 



R. A. Warner, M.D. 



A. Samuels, M.D. 

T. K. Galvin, M.D. 
C. F. J. COUGHLIN, M.D. 



Diseases of Nose and Throat. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 



Diseases of Eye and Ear. 



J. W. Downey, M.D. 
M. Raskin, M.D. 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Proctology. 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Dermatology. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

Assistant. 
William G. Coppage, M.D. 



26 MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 

Dental Clinic, 

NORVAL McDonald, D.D.S. Le Roy Knoble, D.D.S. 

J. Aubrey Lee, D.D.S. 

Social Service Department. 

Catherine Campbell, R.N., Director, 

Dispensary Directress, 

Elizabeth A. Moore, R.N. 

MERCY HOSPITAL, DISPENSARY REPORT 
January 1,1 923, to December 31, 1923, 

Sister M. Helen, Directress. 

_ . , Cases ^ 

Dispensary Clinics New Old Total 

Surgical 873 2,355 3,228 

Medical 917 943 i,865 

Gynecological 333 864 1,197 

Eye and Ear 419 758 1,177 

Nose and Throat 702 770 1,472 

Neurological 142 368 510 

Pediatric 64 61 125 

Gastro-Intestinal 208 634 842 

Dental 211 165 376 

Proctological 57 63 120 

Orthopedic 187 722 909 

Dermatological 254 546 800 

Genito-Urinaiy 4,367 8,254 12,621 



8,734 16,508 25,242 

OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES. 
THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS— BAY VIEW. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals to be 
used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily visits 
and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the Hospitals. 
The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in amount, 
thoroughness in study, and the use made of it in medical teaching. 

The Municipal Hospitals consist of following separate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 

The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 88 beds. 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 



STAFF OF CITY HOSPITAL 27 

STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITALS AT BAYVIEW. 

VISITING STAFF 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physidan-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-ChieJ. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Tuberculosis 
Hospital. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Physician-in-Charge of the City Detention Hospital 
for the Insane 

John R. Cash, M.D., Visiting Pathologist. 

R. B. Wright, M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF. 

Ophthalmologist. 
James J. Mills, M.D. 

Otologist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Gynecologist. 
R. G. WiLLSE, M.D. 

Urologist. 
W. H. TouLSON, M.D. 

Laryngologists. 

H. R. Slack, M.D. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 

Psychiatrists. 

Henry J. Berkely, M.D. 

Adolph Meyer, M.D. 

Orthopedist 
H. L. Wheeler, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician. 
Charles R. Austrian, M.D 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 
C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 



28 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR 

CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park/' a colonial 
estate of seventy-five acres at Hillsdale, within the western city 
limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds and 
every modern facility for the treatment of orthopaedic cases as 
well as a most beautiful park-like environment and farm, and is 
closely affiliated v/ith the University of Maryland for bed-side 
instruction. 

STAFF. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgeon in Chief. 

Associate Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D. 

Attending and Dispensary Surgeons. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. J. Albert Key, B.A., M.D. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Physio-Thci apists and Instructors in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman Miss Elizabeth Emory. 

Miss Florence Grape. 

Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Miss Nora Robinson, Assistant 

Roentgenologists. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. J. F. Lutz, M.D. 

Attending Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D, 

Pediatrist. 
Benjamin Tappan, B.A., M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
A. M. Shipley, M.D. 

Attending N euro-Surgeon. 
Charles Bagley, Jr., M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 29 

Attending Laryngolist. 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Attending Dermatologist. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Urologist. 
Gideon Timberlake, M.D. 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Dentists. 

G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.S, J. B. Bell, D.D.S. 

H. M. Elumenthal, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 
Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas F. Futcher, A.B., M.D. William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, M.D., LL. D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 
John N. Mackenzie, A.B., M.D. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse. 
Miss Mabel Brown, R.N. 

Head Nurse. 
Miss Louise Schaub, R.N. 

Resident Interne 
R. H. Holper. 



30 SHEPPARD AND ENOCH PRATT HOSPITAL 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland 
by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school to 
present to its students liberal opportunities for the study of dis- 
eases of infants and children. 

STAFF. 

Visiting Physician. 
Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeon. 
Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Visiting Obstetrician. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Visiting Dermatologist. 
John Buchness, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedist. 
William H. Daniels, M.D. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE 
AND FEEBLE-MINDED. 

The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for the Insane. 
This institution is one of the most modern hospitals for the treat- 
ment and care of the insane in this country. It is well endowed 
and its superintendent is R. M. Chapman, M. D., Professor of 
Psychiatry at the University of Maryland. In this hospital in- 
tensive treatment and study of mental diseases is carried on, a 
large number of the patients entering voluntarily. The students 
under the direction of Dr. Chapman and his assistants in a series 
of clinics are shown the early manifestations and the various 
stages of mental diseases, the methods of treatment, and their 
effects. 

Spring Grove Hospital. Through the courtesy of the Super- 
intendent of this institution, the Professor of Psychiatry is enabled 
to present to the weekly clinics to the fourth year class the dif- 
ferent t5rpes of psychoses and psycho-neuroses. 



LIBRARIES 31 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the 
collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 15,256 volumes, 
a file of 60 current journals, and several thousand pamphlets 
and reprints. During the year ending December 31, 1923, 350 
volumes were added. It is well stocked with recent literature, 
including books and periodicals of general interest. The home of 
the Library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious build- 
ing in close proximity to the class rooms and the Laboratories 
of the Medical Department. The Library is open daily during 
the year, except in August, for use of members of the Faculty, the 
students, and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land, containing many thousands of volumes, is open to the stu- 
dents of the school. The leading medical publications of the 
world are received by the library and complete sets of many jour- 
nals are available. Other Libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody 
(181,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library (355,817 vol- 
umes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school with- 
out charge. 



32 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision 
of teaching in this school in order to meet modern requirements. 
The multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery neces- 
sitates a very crowded course and the introduction of electives 
will very soon be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments: 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Emxbryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Biological Chemistry. 

4. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

5. Pathology. 

6. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in 
the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost en- 
tirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of instructors insures attention to 
the needs of each student. 

In many courses the final examination as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is deter- 
mined largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned 
work carried on throughout the course. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 33 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 
AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

C. L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

TiLGHMAN B. Marden, A.B., M.D. __ Professor of Histology and Embryology 

Louis C. Dobihal, M.D Instructor in Histology 

J. D. HOLOFCENER, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Stanley W. Matthews, M.D Instructor in Histology 

EvERARD W. Briscoe Assistant in Anatomy 

Wm. R. Johnson Assistant in Anatomy 

RoBT. W. Johnson Assistant in Anatomy 

First Year. Didactic. Five hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. Each day, preceding the laboratory period, a quiz and 
demonstration of from forty to fifty minutes is held, covering the 
laboratory work for the day. 

Laboratory. Eighteen hours each week for thirty-two weeks 
This course includes a complete dissection of the human body, 
including the central nervous system. Abundance of good ma- 
terial is furnished and the student is aided in his work by 
competent demonstrators. Practical examinations are held at 
frequent intervals throughout the session and each student will 
be held to strict account for material furnished him. Each 
student is furnished a skeleton and a deposit is required to insure 
its return in good condition at the end of the session. 

Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, ten 
hours each week during first semester; three hours each week 
during second semester. The most important part of the work 
will be done in the laboratory, where each student will be provided 
with apparatus, staining fluids and material necessary for the 
preparation of specimens for microscopical examination. An 
important aid to the course is the projection microscope and bal- 
opticon which are used for the projection upon a screen, of magni- 
fied images of the specimens actually used in the laboratory, and 
of illustrations from standard text books. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work; one hour each week 
during the first semester, and seven hours each week during tbp 
second semester. 



34 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

This course includes the study of the development of the chick 
and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryology. In 
the laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its various stages 
of development, and sections of the chick at different periods of 
incubation will be made and studied microscopically. The latter 
part of the course will be devoted to the study of sections through 
different regions of mammahan embryos. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the development in the human. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph. D Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

Ferdinand A. Ries, M.D Associate in Physiology 

Joseph P. Pokorny, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

George A. Knipp, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

FiRMADGE K. Nichols, A.B., M.D Instructor in Physiology 

J. Ogle Warfield, Jr., A.B., A.M., M.D Assistant in Physiology 

The course in Physiology extends throughout the First and Sec- 
ond Years. It consists of a series of lectures, covering the field of 
human physiology, laboratory work, demonstrations, and frequent 
recitations. It is constantly in the mind of the department that 
this course is introductory to the study of medicine. The recita- 
tions cover the subject-matter of the lectures and the experiments 
performed in the laboratory. 

First Year. 1. This course includes lectures and recitations 
upon the physiology of the blood and circulation, respiration, 
muscle and nerve, a portion of the central nervous system, and 
special senses, and such chemical and physical facts as are neces- 
sary for a proper understanding of the physiology taught. Two 
lectures and a recitation weekly throughout the year. Dr. Mc- 
Glone, assisted by Dr. Ries. 

Second Year. 2. Didactic instruction. During this year the 
remaining topics of physiology are covered by lectures and demon- 
strations. As in the first year frequent recitations will be held. 
The subject-matter includes the physiology of digestion and secre- 
tion, nutrition, metabolism, internal secretion, the central ner- 
vous system, and the eye and ear. Lectures, demonstrations, and 
recitations, three hours per week. Dr. McGlone, assisted by Drs. 
Conser and Ries. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 35 

3. Experimental Physiology. This is a laboratory course in the 
dynamics of muscle and nerve, studies in circulation and respira- 
tion, and physiology of the special senses. Apart from the aquisition 
of the facts of physiology, the student is taught to observe accu- 
rately, record carefully the results of his observations, and from 
these results draw an independent conclusion. He is also trained 
in the use of instruments which are of value to him in his clinical 
years. Three hours weekly throughout the year. Drs. McGlone, 
Ries, Conser, Pokorny, Knipp, and Warfieid. 

4. Clinical Physiological Conference. During the second sem- 
ester of the second year a clinic is held each week in conjunction 
with the Department of Medicine. At this clinic an attempt is 
made to correlate the work and the instruction of the two de- 
partments and to serve as an introduction to the work of the 
chnical years. Drs. Pincoffs, (Professor of Medicine), and Mc- 
Glone. 

5. Elective Course in Physiological Technique. This course is 
offered to Sophomores. Three hours per week. Second semester. 
Dr. McGlone. 

6. Special Mammalian Physiology. This is a laboratory course 
intended for advanced laboratory students (optional) who may 
wish to do special work in this line of physiology. Hours to be 
arranged. Dr. McGlone. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA. 

William Henry Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

O. G. Harne, A.B Associate Professor of Phannacology 

William Glenn Harne. __ Assistant in Pharmacology 

Esther. F. Kuhn _ _ Assistant in Pharmacology 

1. Pharmacology. Materia Medica and Prescription Writing 
required of all second year medical students during the first 
semester. Didactic, three hours a week; Laboratory, three hours 
a week. 

This course is a prerequisite to all other courses in Pharma- 
cology. Special emphasis is laid upon laboratory methods of ob- 
servation and of intelligent note-taking. The essentials of pre- 
emption writing are taught and the student is introduced to the 
official pharmacopoeal preparations. 



36 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Not only is the student taught intelhgently the use of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary, but the princi- 
ples underlying the establishment of some of the most practical 
recipes are attacked from a didactic point of view. 

2. Systematic Pharmacology. Required of all second year medi- 
cal students. Three hours a week during the year, two lecture 
periods and one period for quiz and general conferences. Special 
care is taken to adapt the material to the practical need of the 
medical student. Emphasis, however, is laid upon the pharmaco- 
logical action of drugs as a pure science in order that a critical 
attitude toward drugs may be instilled. As the student masters 
the pharmacology of an important drug, its dosage, incompati- 
bilities, and practical applications are driven home by systematic 
assignments of prescription writing, quizzes, and conferences. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. — Second semester. Required of all sec- 
ond year students. Prerequisite pharmacology 1. Laboratory, six 
hours a week. 

The course runs parallel with pharmacology 2. Being a lab- 
oratory course it furnishes much didactic material used in the 
class conferences and lectures of pharmacology No. 2. 

As the student's ability in handling biological material develops, 
experiments involving the more difficult technique of pharma- 
cological experimentation are introduced. Special emphasis is 
laid upon the student's ability to handle live tissues and to make 
first-hand observations of a given drug's action, regardless of what 
standard text-books teach. 

Class conferences, discussions, and the reading of assigned pa- 
pers are used to supplement the laboratory and lecture. In these 
conferences the professor in charge attempts to summarize the 
class work as a whole, thereby properly coordinating it. It is by 
these means that the student acquires a critical and scientific atti- 
tude toward official and new and non-offixial remedies. The study 
is limited for the most part to such drugs as are known to have a 
definite pharmacological action and therapeutic value. 

4. Special Pharmacodynamics. (Credit according to work done.) 
This course is open to advanced students and special workers 

who desire advanced training, or who wish to pursue some special 
problem in Pharmacology or Toxicology. Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Schultz. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 37 

5. Research in Pharmacology and Chemo-Therapy. Properly 
qualified students are admitted to the laboratory with a view to 
their carrying on original investigations in drug action. Tho 
newly equipped laboratories are well adapted for post-graduate 
study and research in Pharmacology. Hours will be arranged to 
suit the applicant. Professor Shultz. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M. D Professor of Pathology. 

Standish McCleary, M. D. Professor of Patholopy. 

Sydney Cone, M. D Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Wm. J. Carson, M. D. Associate Professor of Pathology. 

A. E. Goldstein, M. D Instructor in Pathology. 

M. J. Hanna, M. D Instructor in Pathology. 

R. B. Wright, M. D. Assistant in Pathology. 

Courses of instruction in pathology are given during the sec- 
ond, third, and fourth years. The courses are based on previous 
study of normal structure and function and aim to outline the 
natural history of disease. The instruction is made as practical 
as possible that the student may become familiar with the appear- 
ance of organs and tissues in disease and may be able to correlate 
anatomical lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology and Histo-Pathology This course 
is given to second year students. It includes the study and demon- 
stration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances of struc- 
ture, nutrition and metabohsm of cells, disturbances of fat, car- 
bohydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pigment met- 
abolism, inflammation and tumors. The laboratory course con- 
sists in a daily preliminary talk on the subject for study, following 
which the student takes up the study of microscopical sections. 
Gross material from autopsy and from the museum is demon- 
strated in conjunction with the microscopical study. 

2. Applied Pathology, Including Gross Morbid Anatomy 
AND Morbid Physiology. Third year students: In this course 
the special relationship of the gross and microscopical lesions to 
clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. Fresh material from 
autopsy collected at the various hospitals is demonstrated and 
supplemented by a study of the respective autopsy protocols. 

Special stress is laid upon the study of the infectious diseases 
and where possible the causative agents are studied. 



38 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

3. Autopsies. Third year. Autopsy technic is taught to 
small groups of students by special instruction at autopsies per- 
formed at the various hospitals. Students are required to assist 
at the autopsy, study the organs, examine the microscopical sec- 
tions, make cultures and prepare autopsy protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference, Fourth Year. In col- 
laboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from 
autopsies is studied with reference to the correlation of the clini- 
cal aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified 
students will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work 
along the lines of experimental pathology. Adequate space and 
equipment is available. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

William Royal Stokes, M.D. Sc.D .Professor of Bacteriology- 
Louis F. Krumrein, M.D _ .Instructor in Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D... .Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the first year during the second semester. This in- 
cludes the various methods of preparation and sterilization of 
culture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bacteri- 
ological examination of water and milk. The bacteriological 
diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also included in this 
course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with the 
bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also studied 
in the laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are 
taught by quiz, conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes 
conferences and lectures to the second year class throughout the 
first semester and practical experiments are carried out by the 
class in laboratory sessions of three hours each held twice weekly 
during the semester. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D .Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Instruction in Biological Chemistry comprises laboratory work, 
lectures and conferences. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

Laboratory Work. The first few weeks of the laboratory- 
work consists in the preparation of normal and standard solu- 
tions which requires careful use of the analytical balance and of 
volumetric glassware. The knowledge gained in this preliminary 
period is then put to practical application in the making of quan- 
titative determinations of nitrogenous compounds of known nitro- 
gen content. Daily reports are required of each student in this 
work and a careful record is kept of his ability. 

At the end of this period there follows a long course of labora- 
tory work on the chemistry and metabolism of the carbohydrates, 
proteins and lipins. Each t5T)e of foodstuff is considered separ- 
ately; first its chemistry is studied and then its metabolism. In 
following this arrangement the usual long stretch of the pure 
chemistry of all the foodstuffs is eliminated. 

Experiments on the tissues of the body then follow, and pre- 
cede the final group of experiments on bile, milk and those which 
relate to the more thorough study of blood and urine. 

Throughout the laboratory work the older methods have been 
excluded, and those tests which are a duplication of the same 
principle have been reduced to minimum. Quantitative tests in- 
clude only those which are representative and essential. A great 
deal of stress is laid upon the importance of quantitative and meta- 
bolic experiments, so that this type of work constitutes the major 
part of the laboratory experiments in this course. 

Lectures. The lectures precede or run parallel to the labora- 
tory work, as far as possible. The first lectures deal with labora- 
tory technic, the chemistry of solutions and indicators, osmosis, 
the chemistry of colloids, catalysis, reversible reactions, the law 
of mass action and a discussion of enzymes. The lectures which 
follow refer to the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, 
proteins and lipins. Relatively less time is given to the discus- 
sion of the chemistry of the various foodstuffs and more to the 
discussion of their metabolism. In these lectures the fundamental 
principles (biological, physical and chemical) are emphasized, 
not, however, to the exclusion of the correlation of the normal and 
abnormal metabolism. 

The final lectures relate to the discussions of the secretions, 
including milk, and of the blood and urine, including the meta- 
bolism of inorganic substances, salts and water. 



40 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 



Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Medicine 

Gary B. Gamble Jr., A.M., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D.- Professor of Clinical Medicine 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Har\isy G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

H. D. McCarty, M.D. Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H..J. Maldeis, M.D. Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

R. C. Metzel, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 



George McLean, M.D Associate 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D Associate 

E. E. Mayer, M.D Instructor 

D. CoRBiN Streett, M.D Instructor 

C. C. Habliston, M.D Instructor 

J. W. Martindale, M.D Instructor 

Henry Sheppard, M.D Instructor 

Partus T. Baggott, M.D Instructor 

Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor 

Herman Seidel, M.D. Assistant 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Assistant 

William Michel, M.D Assistant 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Assistant 

L. L. GoRDY, M.D Assistant 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D Assistant 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Assistant 



n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medic: 
n Medic: 
n Medic: 
n Medic: 
n Medic: 
n Medici 
n Medici 
n Medici 
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n Medici 



GENERAL OUTLINE. 



Second Year 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester). 
(2 hours a week, second semester). 

(b) Clinical lectures on pathological physiology. 

(1 hour a week, second semester). 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

Third Year. 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis, 

(c) Clinical pathology 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient department 
and in the clinical laboratory. 
II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neurology, 
pediatrics and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical 
therapeutics and materia medica. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks). 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical exam- 

ination, laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and thera- 

peutics. 
II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties (6 hours a week) . 
III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 
IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work. 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University 
Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student 
spends two periods a week of two hours each in dispensary work. 
The work is done in groups of four to six students under an in- 
structor. Systematic history taking is especially stressed. Physi- 
cal findings are demonstrated. The student becomes familiar 
with the commoner acute and chronic disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis. 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions in topogi'aphical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

^ ( Head of Department 

John G. Huck, M.D.._. | Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. Associate in Medicine 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant in Medicine 



42 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the 
technique of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able 
to perform all routine examination which may be called for dur- 
ing his fourth year, in connection with the work in the wards and 
dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lec- 
tures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of 
the department takes an active part. The microscopical and 
chemical study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric juice, 
spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively taken up, and special 
attention directed to the clinical significance of the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent 
and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student is pro- 
vided with a microscope, blood counters and hemoglobinometer 
for his exclusive use, and every two students with a special labor- 
atory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned 
during the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affili- 
ated hospitals. He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which 
is sufficiently complete to enable him to work independently of 
the general equipment. Special instructors are available during 
certain hours to give necessary assistance and advice. 
GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D .Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Morgan, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D _ _ ..Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

N. J. Davidov, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D _ .Assistant in Gastro-Enterogloy 

Paul F. Wiest, M.D._. Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

I. S. Zinberg, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

W. E. Grempler, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year. Clinic recitations and demonstrations to the 
class for one hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary 
sintruction to small groups throughout the entire session. Prac- 
tical instruction in the differential and clinical diagnosis and dem- 
onstrations of the newer methods of diagnosis in gastro-intestinal 
affections. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

PSYCHIATRY. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Paul E. E\verhardt, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

H. M. Pfeiffer, M.D Assistant in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen 
clinical lectures and five clinics which are designed to be intro- 
ductory to the more intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth 
year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical 
conferences on selected groups of cases. Each student works 
for a short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic and 
thus gains practical experience of the problems of history taking, 
examination, and the care of psychiatric patients. 

PEDIATRICS. 

John Ruhrah, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Charles L. Summers, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Clinical Professor of Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Assistant Professor in Pediatrics 

W. H. Ingram, M.D _ Associate in Pediatrics 

H. H. Warner, M.D._ Associate in Pediatrics 

W. J. Todd, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

William F. Geyer, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Bernard J. Ferry, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Charles Goldsborough, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

George E. Wells, M.D __ .Assistant in Pediatrics 

E. C. Reitzel, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Robert S. Kjrk, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. J. DORF, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

D. H. Lawler, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. R. Lickle, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

F. B. Smith, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

G. A. Knipp, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

y^. L. Brent, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

J. J. McGarrell, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of one 
lecture each week in which infant feeding and the most important 
diseases of infancy and childhood are especially emphasized. Drs. 
Rulirah and Summers. 

Fourth Year. During this year a weekly clinical lecture is 
given where the character of disease is fully demonstrated and 
the students are afforded an opportunity for personal examina- 
tion of all cases. In addition ward classes are held weekly where 
bedside instruction is given. A section of the class also works 
daily at the Babies' and Children's Clinic. This clinic, which is 
under the direction of Dr. Summers, has a yearly attendance of 
more than fifteen thousand, and offers an excellent opportunity 
for study and observation of a wide variety of cases under com- 
petent instructors. 

Instruction is also given in the Children's Dispensary at the 
Mercy Hospital. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Neurology 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Milford Levy, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each v/eek to 
entire class throughout one semester. This course comprises the 
study of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, the 
method of neurological examination, and relationship of signs and 
symptomxS to pathological conditions. The material at Uni- 
versity and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Clinical Conference, one hour each week to the entire class. 
This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hospitals. All 
cases presented at these clinics are carefully examined; complete 
written records are made by the students who demonstrate the 
cases before the class. These cases are usually assigned one or 
two weeks before they are presented, and each student in the class 
must prepare one or more cases during the year. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close 
personal contact with the cases in the v/ards under the supervision 
of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four after- 
noons each week. In this way students are brought into contact 
with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later manifesta- 
tions. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

BiRCKHEAD McGowAN, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

J. F. HoGAN, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and PubKc Health 

Third Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. 
The lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: Air, 
Water, Soil, Food, Disposal of Wastes, Communicable Diseases, 
State and Federal Public Health Laws, and Industrial Diseases. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. One hour each week for one semester. 

Inasmuch as Medical Jurisprudence teaches the application of 
every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, civil or 
crimiinal, this course embraces the following: — Proceedings in 
criminal and civil prosecution; medical evidence and testimony; 
identity in its general relations; sexual abnormalities; personal 
identity; impotence and sterility; rape; criminal abortions; signs 
of death; wounds in their medico-legal relations; death, natural 
and homicidal; malpractice; insanity and medico-legal autopsies. 



46 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D.__ __ Professor of Surgery 

Archibald C. Harrison, M. D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

H. C. Blake, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Elliot H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. LocHER, M.D. _ .Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Frank J. Kirby, M.D Associate in Surgery 

CHARLES Reid Edwards, M.D Associate in Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate in Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

H. M. Foster, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. S. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

F. X. Kearney, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Martin J. Hanna, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

G. W. Bowden, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

DwiGHT MoHR, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. R. Geraghty, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

0. H. Lloyd, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde Marvel, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Everard Briscoe, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

1. 0. Ridgely, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. B. McElwain, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

C. F. HoRiNE, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

D. J. Passagno, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D. Assistant in Surgery 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is in the Anatomical Laboratory and the dispen- 
saries, wards, cHnical laboratories and operating rooms of the 
University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and dead-house 
of the Municipal Hospitals at Bay View. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispen- 
sary work, bed-side instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The 
work begins in the second year, and continues throughout the 
third and fourth years. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

Second Year. 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. 10 hours a week for the 
first semester. The course is designed to bridge the gap between 
anatomy in the abstract, and cHnical anatomy as applied to the 
study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students 
are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the 
cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected when necessary to 
bring out outlines and relations of structures. Didactic lectures 
two hours weekly, augmented by demonstrations with specimens, 
charts, and cross-sections. Dr. Holland, assisted by Drs. Herbert 
M. Foster, J. M. Hundley, Jr., Martin J. Hanna, and Leo 
Brady. 

Surgical Technique. The course includes history taking, first 
aid treatment, demonstration of use of tourniquet and other 
emergency appliances and surgical dressings, bandages, plaster, 
adhesive plaster, suture material, solutions; their preparation and 
use. 

It includes also inflammation and suppuration, ulcers, gangrene, 
fistulae, sinuses, non-operative therapeusis, asepsis and antisepsis, 
the study of circulatory and respiratory failure, preparation of 
patients, dummy operations and written description of operation, 
splints, bed frames, bone plates, grafts and local anaesthesia. 

Lectures and conferences two hours a week for one semester. 
Dr. Edwards. 

Third Year. 

General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and gen- 
eral surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the entire 
class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Dr. Shipley. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in 
history-taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the 
bedside and in the deadhouse of the Municipal Hospitals at Bay 
View. Drs. Shipley, Lynn and Reifschneider. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery 
upon the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, 
and each section is given practical and individual work under the 
supervision of the instructors. Dr. Frank S. Lynn, assisted by 
Drs. Nathan Winslow, Locher, Hayward, E. S. Johnson, Edwards, 
Foster, Reifschneide'r, Geraghty, Demarco, Kearney, Briscoe, 
Horine, Pessagno and Onnen. 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Fractures and Dislocations. Twenty-four hours to the entire 
class. This course consists of instruction in the various forms of 
fractures and dislocations and their treatment, and serves as a pre- 
paratory course for clinical work. Dr. Wise, 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes the 
history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diagnosis, 
and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of the ambu- 
latory surgical cases in the University and in the Mercy Hospitals. 
Mercy Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Ridgley, Passagno, Briscoe 
and McElwain. University Hospital — Drs Holland, Lynn, 
Nathan Winslow, Edwards, E. S. Johnson and Foster. 



Fourth Year. 

Climes. A weekly clinic will be given at the Mercy and at the 
University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. , As 
far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — Drs. 
Harrison and McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the opera- 
ting-room and museum are studied in the gross and microscopi- 
cally, in relation with the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment of 
accident cases, with instructions as to the relationship between 
the state, the employee, the em.ployer, and the physician's duty 
to each. One hour a week to sections of the class throughout the 
year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of University and of Mercy 
Hospitals, history taking, and physical examination of patients, 
laboratory examinations, attendance at operations and observa- 
tion of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will 
consist of ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the 
after care of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Harrison, 
McGlannan, Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Chambers. Uni- 
versity— Drs. Shipley, Holland, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

ANAESTHESIA. 
Second Year. 

Lectures on history of anaesthesia: Ancient and Modern. 
General physiology of anaesthesia. Special physiology of each 
anaesthetic agent. Different methods for producing general 
anaesthesia, with a detailed description of each. The selection 
of the anaesthetic and method best suited for its administration 
in particular cases. Difficulties and accidents during and follow- 
ing anaesthesia, their causes, prevention and control. Different 
methods of resuscitation. Blood pressure: Its significance and 
bearing on selection of the anaesthetic and use as a guide during 
anaesthesia. 

One hour weekly for one semester. Drs. S. Griffith Davis and 
W. G. Queen. 

Fourth Year. 

During the clinics and operations before small groups, each 
student will be required to observe the administration of anaes- 
thetics and to keep a chart recording blood pressure, pulse and 
respiration under the direction of an instructor. 
DERMATOLOGY. 

T. Casper Gilchrist, M.R.C.S , L.S.A., M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Joseph E Gately, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

John A. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each v/eek to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of 
the skin. Dr. Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital, Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the common 
skin diseases. Drs. Abercrombie, Robinson and Gately. Dis- 
pensary instruction, Mercy Hospital. Dr. Rosenthal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A. M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

J. Albert Key, B.A., M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

H. L. Rogers, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheater and in the Dispensary, Mercy Hospital and 
Dispensary and Kernan Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled 
Children at "Radnor Park,'' and in the Dispensary of same at 
620 West Lombard Street. 

Lectures, clinics and quizzes will be held at each of the hos- 
pitals once a week. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic will be 
held for small sections of the class at ** Radnor Park." 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and in 
struments required in this surgical specialty, including X-Ray 
technique; Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; defor- 
mities of the feet; non-tuberculous deformities of the feet and 
joints; the paralyses; the bursal, tendinous and muscular condi- 
tions producing orthopaedic affections; rickets; scurvy; osteoma- 
lacia; chondro-dystrophies; wry-neck and the use and appH ca- 
tion of orthopaedic apparatus. 

ROENTGENOLOGY AND RADIOTHERAPY. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D .Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

John Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Roentgenology 

Charles Reid Edwards, A.B., M.D .Associate in Radio Therapy 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

Instruction is given in the history, physics, and practical appli- 
cation of Roentgen Rays and Radium. Especial effort is made to 
demonstrate the use of the Roentgen Ray in diagnosis by instruc- 
tion in both fluoroscopy and plate reading. The sections of the 
fourth year class receive two hours instruction each week. 

The student is also taught the practical, application of Radium 
and Roentgen rays as therapeutic agents. In the X-ray labora- 
tory and in the hospital wards students are shown the use of these 
agents in the treatment of disease. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

George W. Mitchell, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

George Murgatroyd, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

R. J. Kemp, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the com- 
mon diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially- 
directed to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance 
of focal infections in the etiology of general diseases, modern 
methods of diagnosis. Lectures are illustrated by lantern slides. 
Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary Instruction daily to small sec- 
tions at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student is 
given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat practical cases 
under an Instructor. Ward classes and clinical demonstrations 
are given one and one-half hours weekly throughout the session 
in the University and the Mercy Hospitals. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Harris Goldman, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. H. Toulson, M.D _ .Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. GiLLis, M.D. Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Austin H. Wood, M.D .Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. C. Knapp, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

J. H. Collinson, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Milton C. Lang, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Instruction in Genito-Urinary Surgery is given to members of 
the Junior and the Senior classes from both a practical and didactic 
standpoint. The course includes everything pertaining to modern 
urology, such as urethroscopy, cystoscopy, ureter catheteriza- 
tion, renal functional tests, urography, urine cultures, etc. The 
teaching consists of chnics in the amphitheater, ward rounds, and 
attendance by members of the Senior class upon out patients of 
the dispensary. The dispensary classes are carried on both at 
the Mercy and the University hospital dispensaries. In the latter 
institution, the Maryland State Department of Health conducts 
a venereal disease clinic, in which 23,000 visits were paid last 
year. Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered, and 
this rich wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. 
In addition to this, a cystocopic clinic is conducted in another 
part of the dispensary, where the students are given practical 
instruction in the modern, urological, diagnostic methods. 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Fourth Year. This course is for instruction in diseases of the 
Colon, Sigmoid Flexure, Rectum and Anus, and will cover the 
essential features of the anatomy and physiology of the large 
intestine, as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. 
The importance of diseased conditions and malpositions of the 
intestines, in relation to systemic disturbances, will be empha- 
sized by demonstrations. 

In small groups, the students will be taken into the wards and 
dispensaries of the University and theMercy Hospitals, where differ- 
ent phases of the various diseases will be taught by direct obser- 
vation and examination. The use of the proctoscope and sigmoid- 
oscope in examination of the rectum and sigmoid will be made 
familiar to each student. 

A course in Proctoscopy may be given in the City Hospitals at 
Bay View, where abundance of material is always obtainable. 



DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETPvICS. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

George W. Dobbln, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Associate Professor of Obstertics 

J. McF. Bergland Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Stanley W. Matthews, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

F. H. Machin, M.D. Assistant in Obstetric 

SuSANNE R. Parsons, A.M., M.D., Ph.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

J. J. Erwin, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by 
Drs. Dobbin, Bergland and Novak to entire class. Manikin Work, 
Drs. Brack, Smith and Erwin to sections of class at Mercy 
Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Reese, Matthews, Bowe, Machin, 
Gorsuch, Parsons and Rowland at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week for 
one semester to University Hospital section. Drs. Rowland, 
Douglass, Murray and Lazenby. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sections of 
class at University Hospital. Drs. Reese, Gorsuch, Parsons, 
Machin and Rowland. 



DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY. 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

W. B. Perry, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Geo. a. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D. Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Work. A course of thirty lectures and 
recitations. 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward, makes a general physical examination, including the blood 
and urine, before the patient is brought before the class. One stu- 
dent under supervision gives the anaesthetic, a pelvic examina- 
tion is made by six students, and any operation required is then 
done before a section of the class small enough to see clearly what 
is being done and how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole 
group examine microscopically sections prepared from material 
removed from patients that have been before them. 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D Clinical Professor of Otology 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D _ Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D _ Associate in Ophthalmology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Frank Pacienza, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Course in Diseases of the Eye. October 2nd to 
January 18th. Dr. Harry Friedenwald. 

Course in Diseases of the Ear, October 2nd to January 18th. 
Dr. Downey. 

Practical Course in Ophthalmoscopy, once weekly, in sections. 
Dr. Kemler. 

Fourth Year. Clinics in Diseases of the Eye and Ear, weekly. 
Drs. Harry Friedenwald and Downey. 

Ward Studies of ocular and oral lesions associated with gen- 
eral medical diseases, once weekly in sections.. Drs. Clapp, 
Downey and Fleck. 

Dispensary Instruction, daily in small sections. Drs. Kahn, Fleck 
and Downey. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are designed to 
famiharize the students with the common diseases of the eye and 
ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view to meet the needs 
of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is laid upon the rela- 
tion between diseases of the eye and the ear and systemic diseases 
and diseases of other organs. 



SCHEDULE 
FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester 



55 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

9 to 10 

10 to 11 


HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY LABORATORY 
P. & S. 32 


Histology 
P. &S. 34 


Dissecting 
A. H. and 


Embryology 
P. & S. 34 


11 to 


Transfer 


Histology 
P. & S. 34 


Transfer 


Histology 

and 

Embryology 

Laboratory 
P. & S. 32 


Transfer 


Laboratory 


12.00 




P.M. 
12.00 to 
12.30 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Bacteriology 
P. & S. 34 


Physiology 
A.H. 




12.30 to 
1.00 




lto2 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch and 
P. & S. 34 


Lunch 




2to5 




ANATOi 
A. I 


lY AND DISSECTING 
I. and Laboratory 







Classes in Anatomy, Dissecting and Physiology at Lombard and Greene Streets ; all otl 
classes at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Anatomical Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory — Lombard and Greene Streets. 

P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY LABORATORY 
P. & S. 32 


Histology 
P. & S. 34 




Embryology 
P. & S. 34 




9.30 to 
10.30 


A. H. and 
Laboratory 


10.30 
11.30 


Physiology 
P. & S. 34 


Embryology 
P. & S. 34 


Physiology 
P. & S. 34 


Bacteriology 
P. & S. 34 


Physiology 
P. & S. 34 




11.30 to 
12.00 


LUNCH 




P.M. 
12 to 2 


BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY 
P. & S. 32 




2 to 2.30 


TRANSFER 




2.30 to 
5.30 


ANATOMY AND DISSECTING 
A. H. and Laboratory 





Classes in Anatomy and Dissecting at Lombard and Greene Streets ; all other classes at 
Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 

A, H. — Anatomical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Anatomical Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory — Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 



56 SCHEDULE 

SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 
9 to 10 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section A 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section B 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Physiology 
L.B.I 




Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 




10 to 11 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


11 to 
12.00 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Immunology 
A.H. 


12.00 to 
12.30 


Lunch 


LUNCH AND TRANSFER PERIOD 


12-1 

Pathology 
A.H. 


P.M. 
12.30 


Laboratory 
Pharmacology 
Section A or B 


Laboratory 

Immunology 
and Serology 

P. & S. 32 


Medicine 
P. & S. 34 


Immunology 
P. & S. 34 


2.30 






Surgery 
P. & S. 34 


Surgery 
P. &S. 34 




2.30 
3.30 


1-1.30 
Lunch 


3.30 

to 
4.30 
4.30 

to 
5.30 


Neural 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. &.S..33and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


1.30-4.30 

Laboratory 
Pharmacology 
Section B or A 



Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 12.30 to 5.30, at Calvert 
and Saratoga Streets ; all other classes at Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
L. B. 1- — Law Building — First Floor, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 

9.30 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section A 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section B 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Physiology 
L.B.I 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


10.30 to 
11.30 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


11 to 12 

Pathology 

A.H. 


11.30 to 
12.C0 


LUNCH 


Medical Clinic 
Amp. 


P.M. 
12 to 1 


PATHOLOGY LABORATORY 




1 to 2 


Laboratory 

Pharm.acology 

Section A 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 
Disp. 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section B 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 




2 to 3 




3 to 4 




4 to 5 







All classes at Lombard and Greene Streets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

L. B. — Law Building — First Floor, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 



SCHEDULE 



57 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 

9.30 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Therapeutics 
C.H. 


10.30 to 

1 


Physical 
Diagnosis 
Operative 

Surgery 
Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 
Operative 

Surgery 
Dispensary 
Lunch and 

Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 
Operative 

Surgery 
Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 
Operative 

Surgery 
Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 
Operative 

Surgery 
Dispensary 
Lunch and 

Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 
Operative 
Surgery 
Dispensary 

Lunch 


1 to 2 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 33 


Obstetrics 
P. & S. 33 


Gynecology 
P. & S. 33 


Transfer 


2.15 
to 
4.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


2.30-4.30 
Section A 
Clinical 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Gross 
Pathology 
at Bay View 


Clinical 

Pathology 

Laboratory 

P. & S. 34, 32 


Clinical 

Pathology 

Laboratory 

P. & S. 34, 32 


2-4 

Section B 

Clinical 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


4.15 

to 

5.15 


Pediatrics 
A. H. 


Eye and Ear 
C. H. 


2.15-4.15 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
Practical 
Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 

Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 

P. &S. 34 


Preventive 
Medicine 
P. & S. 34 





Fi-om 10.30 A. M. to 1.00 P. M. the class is divided into two sections, one section reporting 
at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, the other at Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 

* At the beginning of the second semester Section "A" at Bay View on Saturdays, 2-4 
P. M., and University Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.15-4.15 P. M. ; Section "B" at Bay View on 
Wednesdays, 2.30-4.30 P. M. 



58 



SCHEDULE 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 
11.00 


Ward Classes 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


Ward Classes 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


Ward Classes 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


11.00 

to 
12.00 


Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Medical 

Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 

Surgical 

Pathology 

P. & S. Sec. 40 


Clinical 
Pathological 
Conference 

Univ. Sec. C.H. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


Surgical 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Medical 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 33 


Pediatrics 

Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


P.M. 
12 to 2 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 


2.15 
to 
3.15 


Dermatology 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Neurology 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


Eye and Ear 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


3enito-Urinary 

Clinic 

P. & S. Sec. 51 

Obstetrical 

Clinic 

Univ. Hosp. 

Amp. 


Gastro-Enter- 
ology Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 




8.80 
to 
5.00 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Urology 

Eye and Ear 


Ward Classes 

Therapeutics 

Proctology 
Radiotherapy 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Roentgenology 

Preventive 

Medicine 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Orthopaedic 

Surgery 

Physical 

Therapeutics 


Ward Classes 

Neurology 

Nose & Throat 

Psychiatry 





The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, the other at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. 
These groups will rotate on the following dates: 



FIRST SEMESTER 
1st period, Oct 1 to Nov. 3 
2nd period, Nov 5 to Dec. 8 
3rd period, Dec. 10 to Jan. 26 



SECOND SEMESTER 
1st period, Jan. 28 to Mch. 1 
2nd period, Mch. 3 to Apr. 12 
3rd period, Apr. 14 to May 17 



C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 

P. & S., 33, 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51 — Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 59 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University 
of Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Registrar on 
the basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and is essential 
for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student Cer- 
tificate are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course 
or the equivalent, and in addition, at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits, includ- 
ing chemistry, biology, physics, and English. 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this Uni- 
versity. 

(A) HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS. 

Graduation from an accredited high or preparatory school 
after pursuing a four-year course based upon an eight-year ele- 
mentary course or its full equivalent as demonstrated by entrance 
examinations. 

At least fifteen units must be offered. J 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED OR ACCEPTED 

FOR ENTRANCE TO THE PRE-MEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Subjects Units* Required 

Group I, English — 

Literature and Composition 3-4 3 

Group II Foreign Languages — 

Latin 1-4 1 

Greek 1-3 I . 

French or German 1-4 [ 

Other foreign languages 1-4 J 



60 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Group III, Mathematics — 

Elementary algebra 1 

Advanced algebra i^-l 

Plane geometry 1 

Solid geometry i^ 

Trigonometry i^ 

Group IV, History — 

Ancient history H-l] 

Medieval and modern history 3^-1 1 

English history 3^-1 \ 

American history 3^-1 1 

Civil government 3^-1 J 

Group V, Science — 

Botany 3^-1 

Zoology 3^-1 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Physiography 3^-1 

Physiology 3/^-1 

Astronomy 3^ 

Geology i^-l 

Group VI, Miscellaneous — 

Agriculture 1-2 

Bookkeeping 3^-1 

Business law 3^ 

Commercial geography 3^-1 

Domestic science 1-2 

Drawing, freehand and mechanical 3^-2 

Economics and economic history 3^-1 

Manual training 1-2 

Music: Appreciation or harmony 1-2 

*A unit is the credit value of at least thirty-six weeks' work of four or five 
recitation periods per week, each recitation period to be not less than forty 
minutes. In other words a unit represents a year's study in any subject in a 
secondary school constituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. A 
satisfactory year's work in any subject cannot be accomplished under ordinary 
circumstances in less than 120 sixty-minute hours, or their equivalent. 

tBoth of the required units of foreign language must be of the same lan- 
guage, but the two units may be presented in any one of the languages specified. 

XOi the fifteen units of high school work, nine units are required, as indi- 
cated in the foregoing schedule; the remainder may be made up from any of 
the other subjects in the schedule, provided that at least eleven units must be 
offered in Groups 1-V. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 61 

(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two col- 
lege sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual instruction, 
including final examinations. 

h. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this 
preliminary college course shall be equal to the work done in the 
freshman and sophomore years in standard colleges and univer- 
sities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in phys- 
ics, chemistry, biology, and English, each course to embrace at 
least six, eight or twelve hours of work in each subject, as shown 
in the schedule following. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PRE-MEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE. 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Semester 
Required Courses: Hours 

Chemistry (a) _ 12 

Physics (b) _ 8 

Biology (c)_._ 8 

Enghsh Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 
A modern foreign language. 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy. 
Psychology. 
Social science. 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of one 
lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less than fifty 
minutes' duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work to be considered 
as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required, of which at 
least eight semester hours must be in general inorganic chemistry, 
including four semester hours of laboratory work. In the inter- 
pretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis may be counted 
as general inorganic chemistry. The remaining four semester 
hours required shall consist of work in organic chemistry. 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at least 
two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes a knowl- 
edge of plane trigonometry. 



■62 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four 
must be laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by 
a course of eight semester hours in either general biology or zool- 
ogy, or by courses of four semester hours each in zoology and 
botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual intro- 
ductory college course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, is 
required. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

The students who have completed the junior year in our School 
of Liberal Arts and who have m.ade an approved choice of electives 
may, if they desire, do the entire work of the senior year in the 
medical school of the University. If they successfully complete 
the work of the first micdical year they are graduated with their 
class with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years, or until he has completed the work 
of the junior class, he is a resident student in the School of Lib- 
eral Arts at College Park, Maryland, and for four years he is a 
student in the School of Medicine in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A. B. degree, and 
at the end of the seventh year the M. D. degree, but credit from 
the Medical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit 
has already been given in the School of Liberal Arts. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior 
year without being candidates for the degree and, therefore, with- 
out examination, may receive a certificate of attendance on com- 
pleting the full course satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine are the same as those enforced against undergraduates ad- 
mitted to advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses— In the April number of the 
Bulletin detailed announcement will be made of the Post-grad- 
uate Summer Courses. 



RULES AND FEES 63 

RULES. 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the 
course he must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation 
at the end of the fouth year will be required to repeat the en- 
tire course of the fourth year and to take examinations in such 
other branches as may be required, should he be again permit- 
ted to enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be 
taken into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results 
of his examination. 

5. All first and second year students entering the School of 
Medicine of the University of Maryland are required to provide 
themselves with microscopes of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, 
Spencer Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attach- 
ments, will fill the requirements : 

Triple nose piece. 10 x and 5 x Oculars. 

Wide aperture stage. 16mni. and 4mm. Objectives. 

Quick screw condenser (Abbe). 1.9mm. 1.25 N.A. Oil Immersion Lens. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate 
to the year ending June 6, 1925, only. The right is reserved 
to make changes in the curriculum, the requirements for 
graduation, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever 
the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 250.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 300.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 10.00 

Special and re-examination fee 5.00 

Graduation fee 10.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution in any class for the session beginning October 1, 
1924. 



64 RULES AND FEES 

All students, after proper certification, are required to regis- 
ter at the Registrar's ofl^ce. The last date of registration is 
September 29, 1924. 

Matriculation, laboratory and tuition fees for the first semester 
shall be paid at the time of registration, and for the second semes- 
ter on or before February 1, 1925. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar 
the student from attendance on classes and other privileges of 
the University. 

Students who fail to pay the tuition and other fees required on 
or before the last day of registration, for each term or semester, 
as stated in the catalogue, will be required to pay as an addition 
to the fees required the sum of Five ($5.00) Dollars and if the 
payment so required shall not be paid before twenty (20) days 
from the beginning of said term or semester, the students name 
shall be stricken from the rolls. 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 65 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE. 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the best 
general examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the 
five candidates standing next highest. 

DR. JOSE L. HIRSH MEMORIAL PRIZE. 

A prize of $50.00 is given each year by Mrs. Jose L. Hirsh as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsh, formerly Professor of 
Pathology in this School, to the student in the third year who 
has done the most satisfactory work in Pathology during his 
second and third years. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of 
this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University each year upon nomination by the Medical Council, 
''to a medical student of the University of Maryland, who, in the 
judgment of said Faculty, is of good character and in need of pe- 
cuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student, who has successfully completed one year's work in 
this school, and no student may hold such scholarship for more 
than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

(Value, $125.00 each) 
Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School 
of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M. D., an alumnus 
of the University. 



66 SCHOLARSHIPS 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the 
Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by the 
Medical Council to students who have meritoriously completed 
the work of at least the first year of the course in medicine, 
and who present to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of a good 
moral character and of inability to continue the course without 
pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, 
M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to "a 
needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the 
Medical School." 

''He m-ust have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

''He m.ust be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship. 

(Value, $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky 
as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an 
alumnus of the University. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to 
"a needy student of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore Class of 
the Medical School." 

"He mubt have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent, in 
all his work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The University Scholarships. 

Two Scholarships are awarded by the University. One to a stu- 
dent of the Department of Liberal Arts appointed by the Presi- 
dent to be held for only one year ; the other, which entitles the hold- 
er to exemption from payment of the tuition fee of the year, is 



SCHOLARSHIPS 67 

awarded annually by the Medical Council to a student of the 
Senior Class who presents to the Medical Council satisfactroy evi- 
dence that he is of good moral character and is worthy of and in 
need of assistance to complete the course. 

The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Medical Council 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship. 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late Mrs. 
Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to a third 
year student who at the end of the second year passes the best 
practical examination in Anatomy, Physiology, Biological Chem- 
istry, Pharmacology, Pathology, Immunology and Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships. 

(Valuation $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from the 
income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence War- 
field. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships will be available to 
students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. Prefer- 
ence is given to students from the counties of the State of Mary- 
land which the Medical Council may from time to time determine 
to be most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships m.ust, after 
graduation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the 
practice of medicine for a term of two years in the county to 
which the student is accredited or in a county selected by the 
Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with 
the condition requiring him to practice in the county to which he 
is accredited by the Council, the money advanced by the Regents 
shall be refunded. A bond in the amount of $1,200., the expense 
of which is borne by the Fund, must be filed by the student accept- 
ing one of these scholarships for faithful performance of the con- 
ditions imposed. 



68 APPOINTMENTS 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session tlie following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school: 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons. One Resident Obstetrician. 

Two Resident Physicians. One Resident Pathologist. 
One Resident Gynecologist. Thirteen Junior Residents on a rotating service. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of 
the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for 
the summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician. One Resident Gynecologist. 
Three Resident Surgeons. One Resident Obstetrician. 
One Resident Physician. Eight Junior Residents on a Rotating Service. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 
The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in Balti- 
more as in any large city in the United States, The following 
estimates of a student's personal expenses for the academic year of 
eight months have been prepared by students, and are based upon 
actual experience. 

Items, Low Average Liberal 

Books $27 48 75 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Roomrent 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 75 

Total $386" $529 $695 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the 
city by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University 
grounds, N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the 
Superintendent of Buildings, who may be found at his office on 
the premises, will furnish them with a list of comfortable and 
convenient boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts for students. 

For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M. D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



MATRICULATES, 1923-24 



69 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 1923-24 

POST-GRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Apgar, Raymond, M.D Maryland 

Carmine, Walter Mills, M.D Maryland 

Davis, George Blackman, M.D Maryland 

Drace, Charles C, M.D Missouri 

Lawson, Wilmer E Maryland 

Leitscii, Leland Maryland 

McClure, Mildred Maclii Maryland 

McDonald, Norval H., D.D.S Maryland 



Mclaughlin, Victor Bruce, M.D, Maryland 

Patterson, Rezir D.. M.D North Carolina 

Richardson, Charles, M.D Maryland 

Slate, John W., M.D North Carolina 

Slusher, Hamilton J., M.D Maryland 

Stone, Otis Bush, M.D Maryland 

Van Bibber, Armfield F., M.D Maryland 

Zimmerman, Amelia V., M.D Maryland 



Fourth Year Class. 



Anderson, Albert Louis Maryland 

Anderson, Richard S North Carolina 

Antonius, Nicholas New Jersey 

Aycock, Thomas B., B.S North Carolina 

Barnes, Dimon Keith Utah 

Beerman, Herman Marlin Pennsylvania 

Bell, Roy Austin, B.S West Virginia 

Berkson, Morris Irwin Pennsylvania 

Best, DeLeon Edward, A.B. North Carolina 

Beyer, Margaret Virginia Pennsylvania 

Boyd, Kenneth Bray Maryland 

Clawson, Thomas A. Jr., A.B Utah 

Daughtridge, Arthur Lee. _ .North CaroHna 

Davenport, Carlton A North Carolina 

Dean, Hugh Elmer, A.B Utah 

Edelman, Edward Isidor New York 

Fields, Daniel Allen North Carolina 

Finegold. Abraham Pennsylvania 

Fisher, Harry Richard New York 

Flax, Ira Isador New Jersey 

Frehling, Joseph Morris Kentucky 

Friedman, Irving New Jersey 

GoFF, John Trevy, B.S West Virginia 

Golembe, Julius, B.S New York 

Granoff, Joseph Frank New York 

Greifinger, Marcus Harry New Jersey 

Grose, Robert Glenn, A.B... North Carolina 

Grossblatt, Philip New Jersey 

Howell, Clewell, B.S North Carolina 

Jacobson, Philip Maryland 

Kafka, Maximilian Martyn, R.S..New York 

Knox, Joseph Clyde North Carolina 

Koons, Earle Weant, B.S Maryland 

Kratz, Fred William Maryland 

Marsh, James Tolly, A.B Maryland 

Marton, Samuel New York 

Maseritz, Isidore Maryland 

Maurillo, Dominick Francis New York 

McConnell, Harvey R., B.S.. South Carolina 



McLane, William O., Jr., B.S Maryland 

Megahan, Burke Pennsylvania 

Messenger, Benjamin New York 

Miller, Benjamin Maryland 

Miller, Jacob M Maryland 

Miller Joseph G Maryland 

Monroe, Clement R North Carolina 

MoRiARTY, Louis Connecticut 

Morris, Philip New York 

Morrison, Wm. H., Jr., B.S Pennsylvania 

MOTTA, Peter George, B.S Pennsylvania 

Neustaedter, Theodore New York 

NocERA, Domingo Porto Rico 

Norment, John E., A.B Maryland 

Owen, Thelma Viola Maryland 

Pachtman, Isadore Pennsylvania 

Parks, Walter Beatty North Carolina 

Perry, Arch H North Carolina 

fPETERMAN, James E Pennsylvania 

Roberts, Bennett Watson.. .North Carolina 

Robertson, Edwin Mason North Carolina 

Salvati, Leo Harry, B.S West Virginia 

Saurborne, Sylvia M. B., B.S._West Virginia 

Scagnetti, Albert New York 

SCHEINDLINGER, MoRRis I New York 

Schlenger, Leo Brenner New Jersey 

ScHULTZ, Louis Ariel New York 

Schwab, Joseph Henry New York 

SciMECA. Antonio Adolfo New York 

Seliger, Robert V New York 

Shapiro, Ralph N New Jersey 

SiEGEL, Samuel Ohio 

Tabershav/, Arnold Leon New York 

Talbott, Richard B., B.S West Virginia 

Theuerkauf, Frank Joseph Pennsylvania 

Warren, Bryan Pope North Carolina 

Weinstock, Alexander A New York 

Whaley, Thomas Bravard Maryland 

Zaslow, John New York 



t A member of the Class of 1923 who was prevented from graduating on account of 
illness. He was graduated on February 1, 1924. 



70 



MATRICULATES, 1923-24 



Third Year Class. 



Balcerzak, Stanley Paul Pennsylvania 

Briglia, Nicholas Natale Pennsylvania 

Brown, Leo T District of Columbia 

Byerly, Marshall Paul North Carolina 

Cadle, Wm. Rodman Maryland 

Cardinale, Pasquale F New Jersey 

Caso, Jose Porto Rico 

Clahr, Abraham Albert New York 

CoE, John M Maryland 

Coonan, Thomas J., A.B... Maryland 

Cope, Arthur A., A.B Pennsylvania 

DODD, Benjamin R., A.B North Carolina 

Dodge, Eva Francette, A.B.. North Carolina 

Draper, L. McF., A.B North Carolina 

Dreskin, Jacob Louis_ __.New Jersey 

Eastland, John S.. A.B New York 

Elgin, Lee William... Maryland 

Ellis, Francis A., A.B... ..Maryland 

Epstein, Harry Herman .New York 

Everett, Franklin R Maryland 

Fancher, H. W., Jr., B.S Connecticut 

Farber, Raphael Pennsylvania 

Fields, Abijah Clements .Alabama 

Fischman, Harold. New Jersey 

Friedman, Bernard. New York 

FucHS, Abner M New York 

Gale, Louis Harry .Pennsylvania 

Gaston, William Bryan West Virginia 

Gattens, Wilber Elton, B.S Maryland 

Glick, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Gurley, Hubert Taylor North Carolina 

Hall, Cecil Maurice, B.S West Virginia 

Hammond, Kent Cato, B.S West Virginia 

Herbert, Alpha Nathan ..New Jersey 

Hertz, Ben New York 

HoFLER, Ralph Hayes North Carolina 

Howell, James Gerald, B.S Pennsylvania 

HULLA, Jaroslav. Maryland 

Jacobs, Maurice Albert Maryland 

Keating, John Patrick Connecticut 

KlMBROUGH, Joseph W., Jr North Carolina 

Knotts, William Kenneth.. .Maryland 



Laus, Edward Raymond... New Jersey 

Leibensperger, George F Pennsylvania 

Lennon, William Earle North Carolina 

Linde, S. Arthur .Maryland 

London, Daniel .New York 

Lowe, Claude Milton.. Pennsylvania 

McAnally, Alfred Loomis... North Carolina 

Miller, Edgar R., A. B ..Pennsylvania 

Minnefor, Chas. a New Jersey 

Montani, Anthony Carmen, B.S Ohio 

Nataro, Joseph New Jersey 

Navarro, V. A., A.B Philippine Islands 

Nelson, James Wharton, A.B Maryland 

Nock, Randolph Maxwell Maryland 

Oshrin, Henry New Jersey 

Pinsky, Myer Mordecai. New Jersey 

Plassnig, Edwin, B.S ..Maryland 

Polizzotti, Joseph L New Jersey 

Pulaski, Leo Edward. Pennsylvania 

Rathsprecher, Isadore New Jersey 

Reynolds, Knight, B.S West Virginia 

Richmond, Lewis Cass, Jr., A.B — Kentucky 
Roberts, Bryan Nazer, A.B. .North Carolina 

Sarnoff, Jack. .New York 

Silverstein, Jacob Maurice New Jersey 

Simon, Joseph R Pennsylvania 

Simpson, Henry Hardy, A. B.. North Carolina 

SiNTON, William Allen Virginia 

Spelsberg, Walter W., B.S West Virginia 

Staeck, Felix Cecil, B.S West Virginia 

SULMAN, William R Pennsylvania 

Tomaiuoli, Michael Francis New Jersey 

Turner, Thomas Bourne, B.S Maryland 

Vila-Morales, Jaime Porto Rico 

ViscoNTi, Joseph A New Jersey 

Ward, Titus William, A.B North Carolina 

Wasserweig, Martin Max Pennsylvania 

WID^rEYER, Robert S., B.S West Virginia 

Wiener, Joseph New York 

Wilson, Paul R., B.S West Virginia 

Winstead, John Lindsay North Carolina 

Zimmerman, Charles C Maryland 



Second Year Class. 



Alperin, Benjamin New York 

Anker, Harry Ohio 

AsKiN, Aaron John, A.B Maryland 

Ballard, Maggie Byrnside West Virginia 

Be achley, Jack Henson Maryland 

*Beamon, Horace V., A.B North Carolina 

Bloch, Adolph New Jersey 

Blough, Homer C, B.S Pennsylvania 

Bronstein, Irving New York 

Calvin, Warren E., B.S Maryland 

Cohen, Morris, A.B Maryland 



♦CoNiFF, Arthur A., A.B Maryland 

D'Angelo, Antonio F Rhode Island 

De ViNCENTis, Henry New Jersey 

Diamond. H. Elias, B.S New York 

DiPaula, Frank Rosario, A.B Maryland 

Eanet, Paul Maryland 

Edmonds, Charles William Maryland 

Fine, Morris Aaron Maryland 

Finklestein, Abraham Harry New York 

Freedman, Herman. New Jersey 

Freedman, Max New Jersry 



* Did not complete course. 



MATRICULATES, 1923-24 
Second Year Class. 



71 



Freuder, Arthur Nathan New York 

Gahan, Emanuel New York 

Geraghty, Francis J.. A.B Maryland 

Gerbeu, Isadoke, A.B Maryland 

Gordon, Abel New Jersey 

Helfond, David Mathew New York 

Hibbitts, John Thomas Maryland 

Hyman, Calvin, A.B Maryland 

Jensen, Jacob Roed, B.S._ __Denmark 

JOLSON, ME-i-ER Stanley, A.B Maryland 

Knapp, Alphonse Joseph, A.B.. Pennsylvania 

♦Kralikauckas, Joseph New Jersey 

Lavy, Louis Theodore Maryland 

Levin, H. Edmund Maryland 

Levin, Joseph New Jersey 

Lumpkin, Lloyd Uber, B.S Maryland 

LusBY, Frank Farrier, A.B Maryland 

Manginelli, Emanuel New York 

Martino, George Caprio New Jersey 

Mattikow, Bernard, B.S New York 

Merkel, Walter C., A.B Pennsylvania 

Miller, Harry. New York 

Misenheimer, Ed. Alex North Carolina 

Moriconi, Albert Francis New Jersey 

*Naylor, Singleton T., B.S Maryland 

♦Norment, Clinton Crawford Maryland 

♦O'BOYLE, Thomas Joseph Pennsylvania 

POLSUE. William Ci^well West Virginia 

Rattenni, Arthur Rhode Island 



Reifschneider, Herbert E., A.B... Maryland 

Rex, Elmer Galen Ohio 

Rocco, Frank New Jersey 

RosEMAN, Ned New York 

Rosenberg, Albert Abraham.. Pennsylvania 

RosENFiELD, Max Harry, A.B Maryland 

*RosENSTEiN, Jacob New York 

Rothberg, Abraham S., B.S.. New York 

Sashin, David .New York 

Sax, Benjamin J New York 

Schenker, Paul Maryland 

Schmukler, Jacob.. New Jersey 

Schneider, David, A.B Maryland 

Schuman, William, A.B Maryland 

Schwartz, Ralph Alfred New Jersey 

Shanklin, William M., B.S Maryland 

Sherman, Elizabeth Bowman, A.B. .Virginia 

Spano, Frank New York 

*Taub, Samuel .New York 

Tayntor, Lewis Olds, Ph.C Pennsylvania 

Teitelbaum, Maurice L New York 

Thompson, Thomas Payne, A.B Maryland 

Tobias, Herbert Ramsey Maryland 

ToTTERDALE, WiLLiAM G., A.B Maryland 

Trubek, Max, A.B New Jersey 

Weinstein, Samuel New Jersey 

Weiss, Louis Leo New York 

Weseley, Louis Jerome New York 

Wolfe, Samuel Benjamin Maryland 



First Year Class. 



Adzima, Joseph Matthew Connecticut 

Aptaker, Albert Jack .New York 

Armacost, Joshua Harper Maryland 

Bankhead, John M., B.S South Carolina 

Basil, George Chester, Ph.G Maryland 

Belsky, Hyman New York 

Benesunes, Joseph George, A.B... Maryland 

BlALOSTOSKY, JULius, B.S New York 

Birnbaum, Joseph Osias New York 

Cadden, John Francis, Jr West Virginia 

Carey, Thomas Nelson Maryland 

Castronovo, Joseph Rhode Island 

Chase, William Wiley, A.B Maryland 

Christian, William Pennsylvania 

Clemson, Earle Princeton Maryland 

Cohen, Bernard J., Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Morris Daniel New York 

CusTY, Edward Guilbert, A.B Maryland 

Davis, Henry Vincent Maryland 

Derwin, James Francis Connecticut 

Donchi, Sol Marvin, B.S New Jersey 

Eliason, Harold William West Virginia 

Feldman, Jacob New York 

Foster, William Abram Pennsylvania 



Friedman, Meyer Henry New Jersey 

Gambale, Francis Joseph Connecticut 

Cellar, Abraham, B.S New York 

Gill, Charles Edward... Deleware 

GiLLis, P^ancis Winfred Maryland 

Ginsberg, Henry Maryland 

Glass, Louis Joseph, Ph.G... Maryland 

Glick, Bernard New Jersey 

Goldberg, Isidore New Jersey 

Goldstein, Milton Joseph. New York 

Grossfeld, Michael Joseph Maryland 

*Hecker, Nathaniel, Ph.G.. .Maryland 

Heisley, Rowland S Maryland 

Hev/itt, J. F., A.B. (Chemistry) Maryland 

Hummel, Ira Lee Cottrell New Jersey 

Jones, Ora Reed ...Ohio 

Kahan, Phh.ip J New York 

Karns, Clyde Fillmore, B.S .Maryland 

*Katzen, Abraham, A.B Maryland 

Kaufman, Israel, B.S New York 

Klawans, Maurice Francis Maryland 

KUTNER, Charles .New Jersey 

Lassman, Samuel, B.S .New York 

Lazow, Sol M New York 



^ Did not complete course. 



72 



MATRICULATES, 1923-24 



First Year Class. 



Lenson, Byruth King Maryland 

Leyko, Julius Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lilly, Goff Platt West Virginia 

LiTTMAN, Irving I Maryland 

♦Margin, Thomas George, A.B Maryland 

Matassa, Vincent Louis Maryland 

McKee, Albert Vincent Pennsylvania 

Michel, George Charles Maryland 

Moore, George Richard Connecticut 

MORAN, John E., Ph.G New Hampshire 

Morris, Francis Kailer, A.B Maryland 

♦Newman, Richard D Maryland 

NussBAUM, Samuel New York 

Peake, Clarence William Kentucky 

♦Peltekian, Panos Sarkis, A.B Maryland 

Phillips, John Roberts, A.B Maryland 

Repasky, John Ohio 

Rich, Benjamin S.. A.B Maryland 

Roetling, Carl Paul New York 

Ruiz, Emilio M Porto Rico 

RuTTER, Joseph Howard Florida 

Saffell, James Glen Maryland 

Schenker, Benjamin Nathan New Jersey 

♦Schmidt, George Henri Maryland 

ScHNiERER, Samuel Benjamin ...Connecticut 



ScHWEDEL, John Bernard.. Maryland 

Singer, Jack Jerome Maryland 

Smith, Paul L... Pennsylvania 

SoBKOV, Samuel Maryland 

Sparta, Tony Pennsylvania 

Stacy, Theodore E., Jr., Ph.G Maryland 

Stonesifer, Chas. Hiram A. B Maryland 

Susser, Max Herman. New Jersey 

Swank, James Levy Pennsylvania 

Swartzwelder, Wallace Ray.. Pennsylvania 

Teague, Francis Bailey Virginia 

Tenaglia, Entimio D .Rhode Island 

Tollin, Louis .New Jersey 

TUMMINNELLO, Salvatore A Maryland 

Upton, Hiram Eugene Vermont 

VoiGT, Herman Albert Maryland 

Von Schulz, Augustine Paul Maryland 

Wack, Frederick Van Deursen .New Jersey 
Waesche, Frederick Seton, A.B... Maryland 

♦Werner, Sidney Edwin Maryland 

♦White, Buelah May Marj'land 

WiLNER, Joseph Walter New York 

Whittington, Claude T North Carolina 

Wohlreich, Joseph Jacob New Jersey 

Wollak, Theodore Maryland 



* Did not complete course. 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SESSION OF 1923-24 



College of Agriculture 291 

College of Arts and Sciences 301 

College of Commerce and Business Ad- 
ministration 547 

School of Dentistry 486 

College of Education 287 

College of Engineering 198 

Graduate School 77 

College of Home Economics 28 



School of Law 552 

School of Medicine 340 

School for Nurses 117 

School of Pharmacy 188 

Summer School, 1923 452 

Total 3864 

Duplications 135 

Net Total. 37 g 



GRADUATES, 1924 



73 



GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

JUNE 7, 1924. 



Anderson, Albert Louis Maryland 

Anderson, Richard S North Carolina 

Antonius, Nicholas New Jersey 

Aycock, Thomas B., B.S North Carolina 

Barnes, Dimon Keith Utah 

Beerman, Herman Marlin Pennsylvania 

Bell, Roy Austin, B.S West Virginia 

Berkson, Morris Irwin Pennsylvania 

Best, DeLeon E., A.B North Carolina 

Beyer, Margaret Virginia Pennsylvania 

Boyd, Kenneth Bray Maryland 

Clawson, Thomas Alfred, Jr., A.B Utah 

Daughtridge, Arthur Lee. _. North Carolina 

Davenport, Carlton A North Carolina 

Dean, Hugh Elmer, A.B Utah 

Edelman, Edward Isidor New York 

Fields, Daniel Allen North Carolina 

Finegold, Abraham Pennsylvania 

Fisher, Harry Richard New York 

Flax, Ira Isador New Jersey 

Frehling, Joseph Morris Kentucky 

Friedman, Irving New Jersey 

GOFF, John Trevy, B.S West Virginia 

Golembe, Julius, B.S New York 

Granoff, Joseph Frank New York 

Greifinger, Marcus Harry New Jersey 

Grose, Robert Glenn, A.B.__North Carolina 

Grossblatt, Philip New Jersey 

Howell, Clewell, B.S North Carolina 

Jacobson, Philip 1 Maryland 

Kafka, Maximilian M., B.S New York 

Knox, Joseph Clyde North Carolina 

KOONS, Earle Weant, B.S Maryland 

Kratz, Fred William Maryland 

Marsh, James Tolly, A.B Maryland 

Marton, Samuel New York 

Maseritz, Isidore Maryland 

Maurillo, Dominick Francis New York 

McConnell, Harvey R., B.S._South CaroHna 



McLane, William O., Jr., B.S Maryland 

Megahan, burke Pennsylvania 

Messinger, Benjamin New York 

M ILLER, Benjamin Maryland 

Miller, Jacob M Maryland 

Miller, Joseph G Maryland 

Monroe, Clement R North Carolina 

MORIARTY, Louis Connecticut 

Morris, Philip New York 

Morrison, Wm. H., Jr., B.S Pennsylvania 

MoTTA, Peter George, B.S Pennsylvania 

Neustaedter, Theodore New York 

NocERA, Domingo Porto Rico 

Norment, John E., A.B Maryland 

Owen, Thelma Viola Maryland 

P ACHTMAN, Isadore Pennsylvania 

Parks, Walter Beatty North Carolina 

Perry, Arch H North Carolina 

fPETERMAN, James E Pennsylvania 

Roberts, Bennett Watson__. North Carolina 

Robertson, Edwin Mason North Carolina 

Salvati, Leo Harry, B.S West Virginia 

Saurborne, Sylvia M. B., B.S. .West Virginia 

ScAGNETTi, Albert New York 

Scheindlinger, Morris I New York 

ScHLENGER, Leo Brenner New Jersey 

ScHULTZ, Louis Ariel New York 

ScHAWB, Joseph Henry New York 

Scimeca, Antonio Adolfo New York 

Seliger, Robert V New York 

Shapiro, Ralph N New Jersey 

SiEGEL, Samuel Ohio 

Tabep.shaw, Arnold Leon New York 

Talbott, Richard B., B.S West Virginia 

Theuekauf, Frank Joseph Pennsylvania 

Warren, Bryan Pope North Carolina 

Weinstock, Alexander A New York 

Whale Y, Thomas Bravard Maryland 

Zaslo\v, John New York 



Graduated February 1, 1924. 



PRIZEMEN, 

University Prize,— Gold Medal, Louis Ariel Schultz 

Certificates of Honor. 



Alexander A. Weinstock 
Marcus H. Griefinger 
Kenneth Bray Boyd 
Robert Victor Seliger 
Antonio H. Scimeca 

In the third year the Dr. Jose L. Hirsh Memorial Prize of $50.00 was avv^arded to 
Thomas J. Coonan, A.B., for the best work in Pathology during the second and third 
years. 



Jonn E. Norment 

Jerome Frank Granoff 

Clewell Howell 

William 0li\^r McLane, Jr. 



74 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE. 

President. 

Robert L. Mitchell, M.D. 

Vice-Presidents. 

C. H. Metcalf, M.D. 

W.P.E.Wyse, M.D. 

J. HuBEPwT Wade, M.D. 

Recording Secretary. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D. 

827 N. Charles St., 

Baltimore, Md. 

Assistant Recording Secretary. 

Nathan WiNSLOw, M.D. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., 

817 Park Avenue, 

Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer. 

Herbert C. Blake, M.D., 

1014 W. Lafayette Ave,, 

Baltimore, Md. 

Executive Committee. 
Wm. S. Love, M.D. 

A. D. McConachie, M.D. Geo. F. Sargent, M.D. 

Frank Jennings, M.D. H. A. Cantwell, M.D. 

Advisory Committee. 
Frank Keating, M.D. 
S. Griffith Davis, M.D. A. E. Goldstein, M.D. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. H. F. Hill, M.D. 

Necrologist. 

W. J. Todd, M.D. 

University Council. 
Robert L. Mitchell, M.D. Charles Bagley, M.D. 

Hospital Council. 
Charles Bagley, M.D. G. Milton Linthicum, M.D. 

Annual meeting of the Alumni Association June 2, 1925. 
Annual dinner of the Alumni Association, June 4, 1925. 



ENDOWMENT FUND 75 



ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following, all Alumni of the University, constitute the 
Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

Harry Adler, M.D. John B. Thomas, Ph.G. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL. D. Horace M, Davis, D.C.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the 
State, its legal title being ''The Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University of Maryland," and is independent and self-per- 
petuating. Its powers are limited to the expenditure of the interest 
derived from the fund, which is to be applied in the discretion of 
the Board for the benefit of the University. Contributions, dona- 
tions and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. They 
may be made to the general or University Fund, to the Medical 
Fund or to any other department of the University. If intended 
for the School of Medicine, they may be given to the general 
medical fund or to some special object, as building, research, 
library, pathology, hospital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, 
scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor 
will be strictly regarded. Attention is invited to the " Charles 
Frick Research Fund,'' already established in mem.ory of that dis- 
tinguished investigator. Checks should be m.ade payable to B. 
Horace M. Davis, D.C.D., Treasurer, Professional Building, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School Of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 
benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property). 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the 

State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property). 



76 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 
OF NURSING. 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing — 
Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses — 
Stella R. Ricketts, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing — 
Janet Nesbitt Smith, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards — 
Louise L. Savage, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards — 
Grace Elgin, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses 

and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion — 

Elizabeth Aiticenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics — 
Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage — 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service — 
Grace Pearson, R.N. 

Helen Dunn, R.N Night Supervisor 

Mary E. Rolph, R.N Supervisor — Nurses Home 

Jane Moffat, R.N Supervisor — Dispensary 

Lena Stauffer, R.N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward 

Ida Nagel, R.N Head Nurse Private Hall 

Leona McMahon, R.N Head Nurse Private Hall 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 77 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

Anatomy. 
C. L. Davis, M.D. 

Physiology. 
C. C. CONSER, M.D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Chemistry. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 

Materia Medica 
C. C. Habliston, M.D. 

Medicine 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. H. M. Stein, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. J. Harry Ullrich, M.D. 

Pediatrics 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Psychiatry and Neurology 
G. M. Settle, M.D. 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Ophthalmology 
Harry Friedenwald, M D. 

Otology. 
J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Surgery 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology 
E. A. Loofer, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
R. TuNSTALL Taylor, M.D. 

Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Social Service 

Special Lecturers. 



78 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

STUDENTS ENROLLED 1923-24 

Seniors 32 

Intermediates 21 

Juniors and Preparatory 21 

Total 74 

GENERAL STATEMENT. 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established 
in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
Hospital, coming under the sam^e governm.ent. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being 
morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing 
about 250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough 
course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing includ- 
ing experience in the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its 
opportunity for varied experience and in its thorough curriculum 
taught by best qualified instructors and members of the Medical 
Staff of the University. 

Admission — Requirem-ents : In order to become a candidate for 
admission to the Training School, application must be made in 
person or by letter, to the Superintendent of Nurses. An appli- 
cation by letter should be accompanied by a statement from a 
clergyman testifying to good moral character and from a physi- 
cian certifying to sound health and unimpaired faculties. No 
person will be considered who is not in a good physical condition 
between the ages of 18 and 35. She must also show that she has 
a High School education or its equivalent. This is the minimum 
requirement, as women of superior education and culture are 
given preference provided they meet the requirements in other 
particulars. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of 
dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation, 
is left to the decision of the Superintendent of Nurses. Misconduct, 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 79 

disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neglect of duty 
are causes for dissmissal at any time by the Superintendent of 
Nurses, with the approval of the President of the University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February, June and Sep- 
tember. 

Hours on Duty: During the probation term the students 
are on duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, 
Intermediate and Senior years, the students are on eight hour day 
duty, with six hours on Sunday and Holidays, and ten hour night 
duty. The night duty periods are approximately two months each, 
with one day at the termination of each term for rest and recre- 
ation. The period of night duty is approximately five or six months 
during the three years. 

Sickness: A physician is in attendance each daj^, and when 
ill all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through 
illness in excess of two weeks, during the three years must be made 
up. Should the authorities of the school decide that through the 
time lost the theoretical work has not been sufficiently covered 
to permit the student to continue in that year, it will be neces- 
sary for her to continue her work v/ith the next class. 

Vacations: Vacations are given between June and Sep- 
tember. A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the 
completion of the first year and four weeks at the completion of 
the second year. 

Expense : A student receives her board, lodging and a reason- 
able amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her 
period of probation she provides her own uniforms made in accor- 
dance with the hospital regulations. After being accepted as a 
student nurse she v/ears the uniform furnished by the hospital. 
The student is also provided with textbooks and in addition to 
this is paid five dollars ($5.00) a month. Her personal expenses 
during the course of instruction and training will depend entirely 
upon her individual habits and tastes. 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION. 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 

The Junior Year is divided into tv/o periods. The first term is 
the preparatory period (4 months) and the second the junior term. 



80 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

In the preparatory term the student is given practical instruc- 
tion in: — 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies. The cost 
of hospital materials, apparatus and surgical instru- 
ments. 
II. Household economics and the preparation of foods. 

III. The hospital out-patients department and dispensary. 

During this term the practical work is done under constant 
supervision, and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen rooms, 
laundry and store room. 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruc- 
tions divided into laboratory and lecture periods is thirty hours 
and includes courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Dietetics, Mat- 
eria Medica, Personal Hygiene, Drugs and Solutions, House- 
hold Economics, Short course in Ethics and History of Nursing. 

At the close of the first half of Junior Year the students are 
required to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral tests, and 
failure to do so will be sufficient reason to terminate the course 
at this point. 

SUBSEQUENT COURSE. 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary pe- 
riod, occupies two and three-fourths years, and students are not 
accepted for a shorter period. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly engaged 
in practical work under the immediate supervision and direction 
of the head nurses and instructors. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Second Term. 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruction 
in Massage, Bacteriology, General Surgery and Introductory Medi- 
cine. Practical instruction is received in the male and female, 
medical, surgical and childrens' wards. 

INTERMEDIATE YEAR. 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes Pedi- 
atrics, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics, Gyne- 
cology and Orthopaedics. The practical work provides experi- 
ence in the nursing of obstetrical and gynecological patients, in 
the operating rooms and the out-patient department. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 81 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During this period the student receives short courses of lec- 
tures on subjects of special interest. This includes a consider- 
ation of the work of institutions of public and private charities, 
of settlements, and various branches of professional work in 
nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administration work to 
those showing exceptional ability in the Senior Year. With 
these students conferences are held on administration and teach- 
ing problems. 

Examinations: At the end of the first half year, students 
are examined in Anatomy, Physiology, Materia Medica, Die- 
tetics and Hygiene. At the end of the first year in Surgery and 
Bacteriology. 

During the second year they are examined in Urinalysis, Mas- 
sage, Gynecology, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstet- 
rics and Pediatrics. At the end of the third year the final exami- 
nation in Nervous and Mental Diseases, Diseases of Special 
Senses, Venereal Diseases, Ethics and History of Nursing. 

Examinations — which are both written and oral — include prac- 
tical tests, and the standing of the student is based upon the gen- 
eral character of work throughout the year, as well as the results 
of the examinations. Students must pass all subjects before 
entering upon the work of the following year. 

Graduation: The diploma of the School will be awarded to 
those who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three years 
and have passed successfully the final examinations. 

Scholarships: One scholarship has been established by the 
Alumnae of the Training School. It entitles a nurse to six weeks 
course at Teachers College, New York. This scholarship is 
awarded at the close of the third year to the student whose work 
has been of the highest excellence, and v/ho desires to pursue 
post-graduate study and special work. 

An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary Board 
to the student who at the completion of three years shows excep- 
tional executive ability. 



82 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Graduates, 192]^. 

Alexander, Edith North Carolina 

Appleton, Pauline Pennsylvania 

Barnes, Merian North Carolina 

Bell, Janet Connecticut 

Bennett, Alice Maryland 

Bennett, Pearl Maryland 

Brude, Lucy Maryland 

Callaway, Esther Deleware 

COMPTON, Pinkie West Virginia 

CoPENHAVER, ELIZABETH Maryland 

Davis, Marie Maryland 

Fisher, Mary Maryland 

Forrest, Lola Maryland 

Headley, Sarah Virginia 

Hoopes, Madeline Maryland 

Hughes, Claire Maryland 

Kraft, Dorothy Maryland 

McCoRMACK, Margaret. Massachusetts 

MoRGART, Helen Pennsylvaniz 

Moore, Rachel Maryland 

Pope, Jane North CaroHna 

Scott, Jane Maryland 

Schaale, Bernice Maryland 

Shaffer, Mary Maryland 

Slez, Irene Maryland 

Spencer. Lenora Maryland 

Sponsler, Mary Pennsylvania 

Tillinghast, Robina North CaroKna 

Thomas, Kathryn Pennsylvania 

Thompson, Icelene Maryland 

V/hitworth, Esther Maryland 

Wertz, Gladys South Carolina 

THE MERCY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

FOR NURSES. 

The Mercy Hospital Training School for Nurses, conducted by 
the Sisters of Mercy, was organized and incorporated under the 
general laws of the State of Maryland in 1899. Its first students 
were graduated in 1901; and on the passage of the bill for regis- 
tration in 1904, the Sisters of Mercy, connected with the Hospital 
service, received certificates as registered nurses. 

The Training School was affihated with the Board of Regents 
of the State of New York in 1906; and in the same year the 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 83 

Alumnae Association was incorporated, having been previously- 
connected with the Associated Alumnae of the United States. 

The graduates, as active members, have been much interested 
in the movements of the Maryland Association of Graduate Nurses, 
to whom they have given every encouragement to uplift the pro- 
fession in its many works of district nursing, tuberculosis cam- 
paign. Red Cross movements, etc. 

The requirements for entrance are: Highest moral standing, 
health, intelligence and a High School education or its equivalent. 
The age limit is twenty to thirty-five years. 

After a three months' probation, candidates, if they posesss the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the Training School 
proper, receiving five dollars a month wherewith to secure text- 
books, etc., the education they receive being considered their 
compensation. The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any 
cause which may be deem^ed sufficient by the Sister Superior or 
Superintendent. 

The course of training comprises three years of theory and 
practice. The clinical advantages are exceptional. The medical, 
surgical, orthopaedic, gynecological, obstetrical, children's and 
dietetic departmients give valuable practical experience. The 
nurses are taught the theory of nursing by class recitations and 
demonstrations by efficient Sister instructors. Supplementing 
this training is a course of lectures from the professors of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Medicine, who are untiring in their 
efforts to keep the School abreast with modem scientific develop- 
ments. 

GRADUATES, CLASS 1924. 
Sister Mary DeSales Burke Sister Mary Anita Stoutenburgh 

Alley, Katherine Ursula Kirchner, Margaret Adelaide 

Hunter, Lillian Frances Smith, Esther Christiana 

Price, Gertrude Dolan Fahey, Mary Catherine 

Burke, ICathryn Teresa Zerhusen, Anna Louis 

BocicMiER, Rita Catherine McHale, Mary La\^tience 

Dutra, Helen Alice Dougherty, Anna Marguerite 

Maguire, Helen Agnes Kramer, Margaret Mary 

Smith, Alice Hildegard O'Neill, Bernice Gertrude 

Streett, Genivieve Maria Maher, Alice Mary 

Shatzer, Florence Dailey, Margaret Mary 

O'Connor, Margaret Mary Collins, Mae Caroline 

Lancaster, Alice Marie Laughlin, Mary Elizabeth 

Mulcahy, Catherine Frances 



VOL. X 



JULY, 1925 



No. 1 



OFFICIAL PUBUCATION 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 




ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1925-1926 



PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR 

JANUARY, APRIL, JULY AND OCTOBER 

LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Post Office at 
Baltimore, Maryland, under the Act of August 24, 191?. 



INDEX 



Alumni Association 79 

Annual Hospital Appointments 71 

Board of Instruction 6 

Board of Regents 4 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medicine 65 

Consolidation of Schools 11 

Curriculum, Organization of 34 

Anatomy 35 

Histology and Embryology 35 

Physiology 36 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica.. 39 

Pathology 40 

Bacteriology and Immunology 37 

Bio-Chemistry 38 

Medicine 42 

Clinical Pathology 44 

Gastro-Enterology 45 

Psychiatry 46 

Pediatrics 46 

Neurology 47 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 48 

Surgery 49 

Anaesthesia 52 

Roentgenology and R.-T 53 

Throat and Nose 54 

Genito-Urinary 54 

Colon and Rectum 55 

Obstetrics 56 

Gynecology 56 

Opthalmology and Otology 57 

Dispensary Reports: 

Mercy Hospital 28 

University Hospital 21 

Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 22 

University Hospital 14 



Dispensary Staffs: 

Mercy Hospital 

University Hospital .. 

Endowment Fund 

Expenses, Students' 



Graduates 

General Summary of Students. _ 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 

Mercy Hospital 

Baltimore City Hospital 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 
for the Insane, The 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 

University Hospital 

Libraries 

Matriculates 

Medical Council 

Prizes 

Prizemen 

Requirements for Matriculation 

Rules 

Schedule 

Scholarships - 

Staffs: 



Baltimore City Hospital 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital- 
Mercy Hospital 

University Hospital 



Training School for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital 

University Hospital 

University Council 

University of Maryland, Organiza- 
tion of 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore Medical College News, and the Jour- 
nal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 

VOL. X. JULY, 1925 No. 1 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 
SESSION 1925-26 



CALENDAR 



1925 - 1926 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

1925. 

September 21 to 25, Inc. — Examinations for advanced standing. 

September 28 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

October 5 — Last day for registration. 

November 11 — Holiday (Armistice Day). 

November 26 — Holiday (Thanksgiving Day.) 

December 19 — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

1926. 

January 4 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

February 6 — Last day for registration (second semester). 

February 22 — Holiday (Washington's Birthday). 

April 1 — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

April 6 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

June 5 — Commencement Day. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of ]\Iaryland is vested in a Board of 
nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for terms of nine years each. The general administra- 
tion of the University is vested in the President. The Uni- 
versity Council is an advisory body, composed of the President, 
the Assistant to the President, the Director of the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, the Director of the Extension Serv- 
ice, and the Deans. The University Council acts upon all mat- 
ters having relation to the University as a whole, or to co-oper- 
ative V7ork between the constituent groups. Each school has 
its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal af- 
fairs of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization : 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Hom.e Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation, 

The School of Business Administration. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy and 
Business Administration are located in Baltimore; the others 
in College Park, Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman Term expires 1934 

Robert Grain, Esq Term expires 1933 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer _ Term expires 1932 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow Term expires 1931 

John E. Raine, Esq Term expires 1930 

C. G. Gelder, Esq _ Term expires 1929 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary Term expires 1928 

B. John Black, Esq _ Term expires 1927 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq. Term expires 1926 



Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., President and Executive Officer. 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Albert F. Woods, A.M., D. Agr., LL.D President 

H. G. Byrd, B.S - - -..Assistant to the President 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S. Dean of the Gollege of Agriculture 

A. N. Johnson, S.B _ Dean of the Gollege of Engineering 

Frederick E. Lee, Ph.D Dean of the Gollege of Arts and Sciences 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D _ Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Head of Department of Information 

H. F. Gotterman, M.S „ Dean of the Gollege of Education 

M. Marie Mount, A.B Acting Dean of the Gollege of Home Economics 

G. 0. Appleman, Ph.D _ Dean of the Graduate School 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc _ Director of the Experiment Station 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr _ Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.G.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 

Herbert Maynard Diamond, Ph.D. Dean of the School of Business 

Administration 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B., M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

A. H. RYAN, M.D. 



6 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D _ ...Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D _ _ Rhinology and Laryngology 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., LL.D Opthalmology and Otology 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M. D - - Psychiatry 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D _ _ _ Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Chas. O'Donovan, A.m., M.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M. D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D _ ...Clinical Medicine 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D _ _ - - ^ ...Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Nose and Throat 

PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., ScD., Professor of Surgery. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., ScD., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M. M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph. D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Georcje W. Dobbin, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Em- 
bryology. 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Jos. E. GiCHNER, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 
Therapeutics. 



BOARD OF INSTEUCTION 7 

E. W. LOCHER, M.D., Associate Professor Operative and Clinical Surgery. 
H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 
C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM., (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene 

and Public Health. 
John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 
S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicins . 
Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 

Roentgenology. 
Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Psychiatry. 
Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 
¥/ alter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 
Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
J. W. Dow^ney, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Nose 

and Throat. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of G^TiecoIogy. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
AbrahapiI Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B,, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Elliott H. Hutci^ins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 



8 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

O. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

Wm. J. Carson, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Sidney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

W. F. Zinn, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Nose and Throat. 

W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc. M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgeiy. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
C. L. JoSLiN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M. D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Theodore Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John R. Abercrombie A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
Geo. a. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Sam'l W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
W. I. Messick, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Wm. H. Ingram, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
H. H. Warner, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

F. A. Ries, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Harris Goldman, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
H. S. Sullivan, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

E. E. Mayer, M.D., Insti-uctor in Medicine. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

D. CoRBiN Streett, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
H. M. Foster, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
MiLFORD Levy, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

J. W. Martindale, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Wm. J. Todd, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

John F. Traband, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wm. F. Geyer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

A. E. Goldstein, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

M. J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

George A. Knipp, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Louis C. Dobihal, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
J. D. Holofcener, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
I. J. Feinglos, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

J. F. Hogan, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Instinictor in Pediatrics. 

William Michel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

W. L. Brent, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Paul W. Rockwood, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. L. SiNSKY, M.D., Instinictor in Opthalmology. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 

Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

H. R. LiCKLE, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

DwiGHT MoHR, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

W. R. Geraghty, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Clyde N. Mar\tl, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Everard Briscoe, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Anatomy. 

N. J. Davidov, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Albert Eisenberg, M. D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. KoPPELMAN, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

George E. Wells, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. J. DORF, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

I. S. ZiNBERG, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

W. E. Grempler, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. G. Gichner, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. H. Collinson, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

H. L. Rogers, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

D. T. Pessagno, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

L. L. Gordy, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

J. J. McGoRRELL, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

F. B. Smith, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

R. J. Kemp, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy and Surgery. 

ROBT. W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Joseph N. Zierler, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

W. E. Cole, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. A. Rutledge, M. D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Frederick B, Dart, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Thelma V. Owen, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Pediatrics. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Assistant in Surgeiy and Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
A. C. Monninger, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
M. Alexander Novey, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Pathology. 
ISADOR A. Siegel, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Pathology. 
John A. O'Connor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Lawrence S. Otell, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

and 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both insti- 
tutions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Bal- 
timore Medical College, the entire equipment of three large 
medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one 
of the oldest foundations for medical education in America, 
ranking fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of 
the United States. It was chartered in 1807, under the name 
of the College of Medicine of Maryland, and its first class was 
graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College was empowered by 
the Legislature to annex three other colleges or faculties, of 
Divinity, of Law, and of Arts and Sciences, and the four col- 
leges thus united were ''constituted an University by the name 
and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of 
Medicine of the University of Maryland has always been a 
leading medical college, especially prominent in the South and 
widely known and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure in Amer- 
ica devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries and the first medical college library in 
the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a 
compulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Den- 
tistry was first given (1837), and here were first installed 
independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases of Women 
and Children (1867) and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 



12 ORGANIZATION 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 
hospital, and in this hospital intramural residency for the 
senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore 
Medical College, an institution of 32 years' growth. By this 
association the facilities of the School of Medicine were en- 
larged in faculty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated 
under Legislative enactment in 1872, and established on Han- 
over Street in a building afterwards known as the Matemite, 
the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was 
affected with the Washington University School of Medicine, in 
existence since 1827, and the College was removed to its pres- 
ent location at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this arrange- 
ment medical control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy 
Hospital, was obtained, and on this foundation in 1899 the 
present admirable college building was erected. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

THE LABORATORIES. 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of 
buildings at Greene and Lombard Sts., and the Building at Cal- 
vert and Saratoga Sts. The schedule is so adjusted that the 
laboratory periods are placed with a view of obviating unnec- 
essary movement on the part of the classes. The building 
known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Sts., 
houses three departments. The Anatomical Laboratory is 
placed upon the top floor, where skylights and an auxiliary 
modern system of electric lighting gives adequate illumination 
of the subjects. On this floor are the office of the department 
and the necessary preparation rooms.. The Department of 
Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is a large room 



ORGANIZATION 13 

for the general student laboratory, which is thoroughly 
equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in addi- 
tion contains many instruments of unique and original design. 
With office and stock-room adjoining, this laboratory is com- 
plete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray 
Laboratory is the Department of Physiology. In addition to 
the large student laboratory, which is constructed for sections 
of forty-five students, there are rooms for the departmental 
office, preparation of material, and storage of apparatus. An 
additional room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experi- 
ments. In this building there is maintained an animal 
room where is kept an abundance of material for experi- 
mental purposes. The embalming and storage plant for the 
Department of Anatomy is in physical connection with the 
building and its special department. The laboratories of 
physiology and pharmacology are completely equipped with 
apparatus lockers so that in accord with the best ideas of in- 
struction, the students work in groups of two each, and each 
group has sufficient apparatus so that the experimental work 
can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general stock- 
room. 

The laboratories of Pathology and Biochemistry are located 
on the third floor of the Dental Building. The former depart- 
ment has a large student laboratory with a capacity of ninety ; 
the tables are so placed as to secure the most satisfactory illu- 
mination for microscopic work, in addition, all of the tables 
are electrically equipped for substage illumination. This 
equipment is also provided for all laboratories where micro- 
scopic work obtains. The museum of the Department of Pa- 
thology adjoins the student laboratory. Here are available for 
demonstration about fifteen hundred carefully prepared and 
mounted specimens, and for laboratory instruction and study, 
the material from more than two hundred autopsies with com- 
plete clinical histories. Several preparation, research, and of- 
fice rooms communicate with the other rooms of this depart- 
ment. The laboratory of Biochemistry is constructed and 
equipped for sections of fifty. The laboratory is completely 
equipped for the facilitation of work. The office and stock- 
room adjoin. In the Main Building is the Museum of Anat- 



14 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

omy, where are arranged for student reference, specimens 
which represent the careful selection of material over a period 
of many years. In the University Hospital is the Student 
Laboratory for the analytical studies of those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the v/ards. A similar laboratory 
is maintained in the building at the N. W. corner of Saratoga 
and Calvert Sts., for the student work on the wards of the 
Mercy Hospital. 

In this latter building are two laboratories for Bacteriology, 
Histology, and Clinical Pathology, and an additional dissecting 
room which is used for the course in Topographical Anatomy. 
The two laboratories accommodate ninety students or the full 
class, and are equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes 
and apparatus. Each of the departments housed in this build- 
ing are provided with their individual offices, preparation, and 
stockrooms. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES. 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital which is the property of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of the 
sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 
1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that 
time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. 

The present hospital has a capacity of 275 beds devoted to 
general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly mod- 
ern X-ray department and clinical laboratory, and a postmor- 
tem building which is constructed with special reference to 
the instruction of students in pathological aimtomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings 
so that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture 
halls and laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary 
and wards. 

Owing to its situation, being adjacent to the largest manu- 
facturing district of the city and the shipping district, large 
numbers of accident cases are received. These combined -with 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 15 

the cases of many sick seamen and with patients from our own 
city furnish a large amount of clinical material. Accommoda- 
tions for thirty obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital 
for the purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to 
each member of the graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door ob- 
stetrical clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful 
pre-natal supervision, is attended during labor by a physician 
and graduate nurse — one senior student also being present — 
and is visited during the puerperium by the attending student 
and graduate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor and puerperal 
records are kept, making this work of extreme value to the 
medical student, not only from the obstetrical standpoint, but 
in making him appreciate the value of social service and pub- 
lic health work. 

During the year ending May 31, 1925, 372 cases were deliv- 
ered in the hospital and 874 cases in the out-door department. 
Each student in the graduating class delivered an average of 
fifteen cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital 
and the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in 
order that the teaching may be the same in each. Each dis- 
pensary has the following departments: Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, 
Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, Der- 
matology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special depart- 
ments one hour each day. 



16 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

HOSPITAL COUNaL. 

Albert F. Woods, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., President 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean. 

M. C. PiNCOFFS, S.B., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, President of the Board of Regents. 

A. J. LoMAS, M.D., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 

J. Allison Mum, 

G. M. Shriver, 

W. B. Brooks, 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff. 
Page Edmunds, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni. 
Charles Bagley, M.D. G. Milton Linthicum, M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

Physicians. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Paul W. Clough, M.D. Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 

Gas tro-Enterologist. 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 



Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist. 
R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatrician^ 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 17 

Pathologists, 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. W. J. Carson, M.D. 

S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. Paul R. Rockwood, M.D, 

Surgeons. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Laryngologist, 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Orthopaedic SiirgeoTis. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Geni to-Urinary Surgeon. 
W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. 

Roentgenologists. 
Henry J. Walton, M*.D. Howard E. Ashbury, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Henry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Anaesthetists. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D. Samuel W. Moore, DD.S. 

W. G. Queen, M.D. 

Obstetricians. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists. 

Harry Friedenwald, M. D. 

William Tarun, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 



18 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Gynecologists, 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D. W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

Hugh Brent, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 

RESIDENT STAFF. 

Resident Physician. 
T. A. Clawson, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician. 
Edwin M. Robertson, M.D. 

Resident Surgeon. 
J. Ogle Warfield, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons. 

Richard S. Anderson, M.D. 

J. R. Bishop, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Frederick A. Snyder, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Obstetrician. 
Joseph H. Schwab, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist, 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

Resident Pediatrician. 
Rachel Korotky, M.D. 

Internes. 

M. P. BYE2iLY, M.D. Samuel Click, M.D. 

Thomas J. Coonan, M.D. Cecil M. Hall, M.D. 

Eva F. Dodge, M.D. Wm. K. Knotts, M.D. 

Lee Wm. Elgin, M.D. Lewis C. Richmond, Jr., M.D. 

A. C, Fields, M.D. W. E. Lennon, M.D. 

Wm. B. Gaston, M.D. A. L. Mc An ally, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 19 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

Medicine. 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

H. M. BuBERT, M.D. RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D. L. L. Gordy, M.D. 

D. CoRBiN Streett, M.D. William Michel, M.D. 

B. P. Warner, M.D. A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D. 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestine. 

J. H. Ullrich, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Joseph Sindler, M. D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. N. J. Davidov, M.D. 

W. Armstrong, M.D. 

Pediatrics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. H. Ingram, M.D. Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

H. H. Warner, M.D. , J. H. Traband, M.D. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D. ' W. G. Geyer, M.D. 
W. J. Todd, M.D. H. W. Wheaton, M.D. 

C. R. GoLDSBOROUGH, M.D. C. E. Macke, M.D. 

G. E. Wells, M.D. H. J. Dorf, M.D. 
F. S. OpEM, M.D. H. R. Lickle, M.D. 
F. B. Smith, M.D. . G. A. Knipp, M.D. 

W. L. Brent, M.D. J. J. McGarrell, M.D. 

W. E. Cole, M.D. H. A. Rutledge, M.D. 

Neurology. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. B. Pushkin, M.D. 

Psychiatry* 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. S. Suluvan, M.D. 

Tuberculosis. 
C. C. Habuston, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Surgery. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

H. M. Foster, M.D. E. S. Johnson, M.D. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. W. R. Johnson, M.D. 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. James Brown, M.D. 

C. F. HoRiNE, M.D. S. H. Cv'LVYR, M.D. 
J. A. O'Connor, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Compton Riely, M.D. Chief of Clinic. 
W. H. Daniels, M.D. H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary. 

W. H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Harris Goldman, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

J. H. COLLINSON, M.D. H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D. L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

X-Ray. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Roentgenologist. 

Dermatology. 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
J. E. Gately, M.D. 

Gynecology. 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. George L. Wissig, M.D. 

Obstetrics. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. Chief of Clinic. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, B.A., M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, M.D. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D . M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

Thelma V. Owen, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 21 

Eye and Ear. 

H.4JiRY Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology, 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

H. L. SiNSKY, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Charles Cahn, M.D. John G. Runkel, M.D. 

Nose and Throat. 

E. A. LOOPER, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Frank B. Anderson, Chief of Clinic. 
J. G. Alexander, M.D. Charles J. Norton, M.D. 

Social Service. 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT. 

January 1, 1924, to December 31, 1924. 

Cases 

New 

Pediatrics _ „ _ 2,280 

Dermatology _ _ _.. 3,161 

Medicine - _ -„ _ _.. 1,105 

Obstetrics _ 1,414 

Surgical _._ 1,975 

Ophthalmology 1,510 

Gynecology _ ;„ _ 1,078 

Orthopedics 305 

Nose and Throat - 887 

Neurology 220 

Gastro-Enterology _ 240 

Tuberculosis _ 223 

Proctology _ _ 18 

Psychiatry _ _ 151 

Cystoscopy _ 65 

Genito-Urinary 398 



Old 


Total 


17,578 


19,858 


3,580 


6,741 


3,452 


4,557 


4,310 


5,724 


6,830 


8,805 


3,325 


4,835 


1,648 


2,726 


3,050 


3,355 


932 


1,819 


1,136 


1,356 


759 


999 


203 


426 


36 


54 


113 


264 


178 


243 


1,196 


1,594 



15,030 48,326 63,356 

In addition to the above there were treated in the State Venereal 
Clinic 22,346 patients. 



22 MERCY HOSPITAL 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at 
the comer of Calvert and Saratoga Streets then owned by the 
Washington University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the 
Hospital came under the control of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work of admin- 
istering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hos- 
pital, as it was then called, was much too small to accommo- 
date the rapidly growing demands upon it. However, it was 
not until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of 
the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, were 
able to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This 
building was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then 
the growing demands for more space has compelled the erec- 
tion of additions, until now there are accommodations for 351 
patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City 
Hospital to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 800,000 
inhabitants. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the ex- 
clusive control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

It adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients from 
the public wards are operated upon in the College operating 
rooms. This union of the Hospital and College buildings great- 
ly facilitates the clinical teaching, as there is no time lost in 
passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and 
Electric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients 
from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company and its branches. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 23 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Samuel S. Shoemaker. Esq., Chairman 

Sister M. Carmelita Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Sister M. Thomasina Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Sister M. Hilda W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Sister M. Beatrice H. G. Beck, M.D. 

Sister M. Florence F. D. Sanger, M.D. 

Sister M. Louise T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

SURGICAL DIVISION. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Elliot H. Hutchins, M.D. A. M. Evans, M.D. 

R. H. Locher, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

Thomas R. Chambers, M.D. F. X. Kearney, M.D. 

Assistant Surgeons. 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.D. Chas. Maxson, M.D. 

N. C. Marvel, M.D. H. B. McElvi^ain, M.D. 

Everard Briscoe, M.D. D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists. 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologists and Laryngologists. 
W. F. ZiNN, M.D. Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

Proctologist. 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Associate, 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 



24 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Orthopaedic Surgeon. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate. 

H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologists. 

A. G. Rytina, M.D. A. J. Gillis, M.D. 

MEDICAL DIVISION. 

Physicians. 

Maltrice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. Gary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. H. G. Beck, M.D. 

Associates. 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. E. E. Mayer, M.D. 

C. C. W. JUDD, M.D. Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 

J. W. Martindale, M.D. G. McLean, M.D. 

Leon Freedom, M.D. 

Assistant. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 

Julius Friedsnwald, M.D. 

Associates. 

T. Fredexiick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Pediatrcians. 

John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenv/ald, M.D. 

Assistant. 

F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist. 

Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 25 

Assistant, 
MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 

DerTTiatologist, 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

ObstetHcians. 

Charles Brack, M.D. Geo. W. Dobbin, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians, 

E. P. Smith, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. . 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Gynecologists. 

Wiluam S. Gardner, M.D. Abraham Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists, 
T. K. Galvin, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Pathologists, 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spencjer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D. 

John G. Huck, M.D. Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians — Sister M. Joan, Ph.G., R.N., Anna Chenoweth, R.N. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 
Radiographers. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF. 

Resident Physicians. 

F. B. Dart, M.D., Chief Resident Physician. 
E. C. Swift, M.D., Assistant Resident Physician. 



26 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



Resident Surgeons. 

H. F. BoNGARDT, M.D., Chief Resident Surgeon, 

W. W. Walker, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

J. M. Frehling, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon, 

Emil Adler, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

F. W. Kratz, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

J. E. NORMENT, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

Resident Gynecologist. 
P. G. MoTTU, M.D. 



L. T. Brown, M.D. 
R. J. Fields, M.D. 
L. H. Gale, M.D. 
E, C. Donohue, M.D. 
J. P. Keating, M.D. 



Internes. 



E. J. KlELAR, M.D. 
C. M. Lowe, M.D. 
Edward Plassnig, M.D. 
L. E. Pulaski, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Surgery. 

Supervisors. 

Alexius McGlannan, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons. 



A. M. Evans, M.D. 
D. H. MoHR, M.D. 
I. 0. Ridgely, M.D. 



Clyde Marvel, M.D. 
Everard Briscoe, M.D. 
H. B. McElwain, M.D. 



Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. M. Golley, M.D. 

Medicine. 
Supervisors, Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D., M. C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D. 
Attending Physicians. 
Herman Seidel, M.D. F. N. Hillis, M.D. 

W^ETHERBEE FORT, M.D. B. T. BaGGOTT, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 27 

Diseases of Stomach, 

Supervisor f Juuus Fbiedenwald, M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 

T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. S. Zinberg, M.D. 

M. Feldman, M.D. A. Eisenbbrg, M.D. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. J. N. Zierler, M.D. 

Joseph Sindleb, M.D. I. I. Levy, M.D. 

E. E. Grempler, M.D. 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D., Esophagoscopist, 

Nervous Diseases. 

Supervisor, A. C. GiLLlS. 

Attending Physicians, 

Milpord Levy, M.D. R. A. Warner, M.D. 

Diseases of Women. 

Supervisors. 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. A. Samuels, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons. 

E. P. Smith, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. C. F. J. CouGHLiN, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat 

W. F. Zinn, M.D. R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 

F. A. Pacienza, M.D. R. J. Kemp, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear. 

H. F. Fleck, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

J. I. Kemler, M.D. M. Raskin, M.D. 

F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Proctology. 

L, J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Dermatology. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

Assistant. 

Whjjam G. Coppage, M. D. 



28. MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 

DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 

Sister M. Helen, R. N. 
Sister M. Imelda, R. N. Catherine Campbell, R. N. 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT. 

January 1, 1924, to December 31, 1924. 

Sister M. Helen, Directress 

Cases 

Dispensary Clinics New Old Total 

Surgical _.„.. 903 2,159 3,062 

Medical .._ _ _ .._.. 943 1,111 2,054 

Gynecological _ 395 1,270 1,665 

Eye and Ear _ _ „ ...._ 440 785 1,225 

Nose and Throat _.„ 653 808 1,461 

Neurological _ 91 317 408 

Gastro-Intestinal _..... 148 544 692 

Dental „ _ _ 79 70 149 

Proctological _ _„ 31 51 82 

Orthopedic .._ 230 1,265 1,495 

Dermatological _..._ 210 414 624 

Genito-Urinary 861 4,160 5,021 



4,984 12,954 17,938 

OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely- 
increased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors 
of City Charities to allow the immense material of these hos- 
pitals to be used for the purpose of medical education. There 
are daily visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff 
of the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness in study, and the use made 
of it in medical teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospital consists of the following sep- 
arate hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 88 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 
The Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 



STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL 29 

STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE aTY HOSPITAL. 

VISITING STAFF. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Phydcian-in-Chief, 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Tuberculosis Uo^fla^L 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Physician-in-Charge of the Detention HospitcU 

for the Insane. 
Frank B. Kindell, A.B., M.D., Visiting Pathologist, 
Lawrence S. Otell, M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF. 

Otologist. 

Willl\m Tarun, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist. 
W. H. Toulson, M.D. 

Laryngo lo gists. 

H. R. Slack, M.D. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 

Psychiatrists. 

Henry J. Berkely, M.D. 
Adolph Meyer, M.D. 

Orthopedist. 
H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician. 
Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 
C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 



30 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR 

CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active 
treatment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park,'* a 
colonial estate of seventy-five acres at Hillsdale, within the 
western city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds 
and every modern facility for the treatment of orthopaedic 
cases as well as a most beautiful park-like environment and 
farm, and is closely affiiliated with the University of Maryland 
for bed-side instruction. 

STAFF. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

CoMPTON Riely, M.D. 

Dispensary Surgeons. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Physio-Therapists and Instructors in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman Miss Elizabeth Emory 

Miss Florence Grape 

Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Miss Nora Robinson, Assistant. 

Roentgenologists. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D. J. F. Lutz, M.D. 

Attending Plastic Surgeon. 

John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Pediatrist. 

Benjamin Tappan, B.A., M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 

A. M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 31 

Attending N euro -Surg eon, 
Charles Bagley, Jr., M.D. 

Attending Laryngologist. 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Attending Dermatologist. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
Howard J. Malimhs, M.D. 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Dentists. 

G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.S. J. B. Bell, D.D.S. 

H. M. Blumenthal, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas F. Futcher A.B., M.D., William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, M.D., LL.D. 

Consulting Largnogolist. 
John N. Mackenzie, A.B., M.D. 

Dispensary and social Service Nurse. 
Miss Mabel Brown, R.N. 

Head Nurse. 
Miss Louise Schaub, R.N. 

Resident Interne. 
Gordon Bennett Taylob 



32 SHEPPARD AND ENOCH PRATT HOSPITAL 

ST. VINCEXT^S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Mary- 
land by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this 
school to present to its students liberal opportunities for the 
study of diseases of infants and children. 

STAFF. 

Visiting Physician. 
Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeon. 
Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Visiting Obstetrician. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Visiting Dernnatologist. 
John Buchness, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedist. 
William H. Daniels, M.D. 

INSTITLTIONS for THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE 
AND FEEBLE-MINDED. 

The Sheffard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for the In- 
sane. This institution is one of the most modem hospitals for 
the treatment and care of the insane in this country. It is well 
endowed and its superintendent is R. M. Chapman, M. D., Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland. In this 
hospital intensive treatment and study of mental diseases is 
carried on, a large number of the patients entering voluntarily. 
The students under the direction of Dr. Chapman and his as- 
sistants in a series of clinics are shown the early m.anifesta- 
tions and the various stages of mental diseases, the methods 
of treatment, and their effects. 

Spring Grove Hospital. Through the courtesy of the Su- 
perintendent of this institution, the Professor of Psychiatry is 
enabled to present to the weekly clinics to the fourth year class 
the different types of psychoses and psycho-neuroses. 



LIBRARIES 33 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase 
of the collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 16,363 
volumes, a file of 80 current journals, and several thousand 
pamphlets and reprints. During the year ending December 
31, 1924, 1,059 volumes were added. It is well stocked with 
recent literature, including books and periodicals of general in- 
terest. The home of the Library is Davidge Hall, a comfort- 
able and commodious building in close proximity to the class 
rooms and the Laboratories of the Medical Department. The 
Library is open daily during the year, except in August, for 
use of members of the Faculty, the students, and the profes- 
sion generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of 
Maryland, containing 40,000 volumes, is open to the students 
of the school. The leading medical publications of the world 
are received by the libraiy and complete sets of many journals 
are available. Other Libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody 
(213,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library (459,669 
volumes) . 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school 
without charge. 



34 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURKICULUM 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision 
of teaching in this school in order to meet modern require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialties in medicine and surg- 
ery necessitates a very crowded course and the introduction of 
electives will very soon be depended on to solve some of the 
difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments : 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology) . 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties) . 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, 
but in no case are the students of different years thrown to- 
gether in the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study 
of the structures and functions of the normal body. Labora- 
tory work occupies most of the student's time during these 
two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgeiy is 
given in the second year. The third and fourth years are al- 
most entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt 
to bring together teacher and student in close personal rela- 
tionship. In many courses of instruction the classes are di- 
vided into small groups and a large number of instructors in- 
sures attention to the needs of each student. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 35 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of 
proficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is 
determined largely by partial examinations, recitations and 
assigned work carried on throughout the course. 

DEPARTMENT OF AJ>JATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 

AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

C. L. Davis, M.D „ - - - ...Professor of Anatomy 

TiLGHMAN B. Marden, A.B., M.D....Professor of Histology and Embryology 

Louis C. Dobihal, M.D _ .._. ....- Instructor in Histology 

J. D. HOLOFCENER, M.D _ - - - - ...Instructor in Histology 

EvERARD W. Briscor - - Assistant in Anatomy 

Wm. R. Johnson..^.. _ _ - - Assistant in Anatomy 

ROBT. W. Johnson — - Assistant in Anatomy 

FmsT Year. Didactic, Five hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. Each day, preceding the laboratory period, a quiz 
and demonstration of from forty to fifty minutes is held, cov- 
ering the laboratory work for the day. 

Laboratory. Eighteen hours each week for thirty-two weeks 
This course includes a complete dissection of the human body, 
including the central nervous system. Abundance of good ma- 
terial is furnished and the student is aided in his work by com- 
petent demonstrators. Practical examinations are held at fre- 
quent intervals throughout the session and each student will 
be held to strict account for material furnished him. Each 
student is furnished a skeleton and a deposit is required to in- 
sure its return in good condition at the end of the session. 

Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, ten 
hours each week during first semester ; three hours each week 
during second semester. The most important part of the work 
will be done in the laboratory, where each student will be pro- 
vided with apparatus, staining fluids and material necessary 
for the preparation of specimens for miscroscopical examina- 
tion. An important aid to the course is the projection miscro- 
scope and balopticon which are used for the projection upon a 
screen, of magnified images of the specimens actually used in 
the laboratoi-y, and of illustrations from standard text books. 



36 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Embryology, 

Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work; one hour each 
week during the first semester, and seven hours each week dur- 
ing the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the 
chick and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryol- 
ogy. In the laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its 
various stages of development, and sections of the chick at dif- 
ferent periods of incubation will be made and studied micro- 
scopically. The latter part of the course vdll be devoted to the 
study of sections through different regions of mammalian em- 
bryos. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the development in the human. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D... _ ^..Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D. Associate Professor of Physiology 

Ferdinand A. Eies, M.D. Associate in Physiology 

George A. Knipp, M.D. . _ Instructor in Physiology 

1. Physiology. The required course consists of lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work, demonstrations and conferences 
in the first and second years. 

First Year. Two periods weekly of one hour each are given 
during the second half of the first year. These lectures are de- 
voted to a general survey of the subject; the application of 
physical and physico-chemical methods to experimental physi- 
ology; the application of statistical methods and the presen- 
tation of results. The physiology of vision is also covered in 
lectures, the laboratory work being given in the second year. 

Second Year. Three one-hour periods weekly throughout 
the year are devoted to lectures, recitations and demonstra- 
tions. Three hours weekly during the first semester and six 
hours per week during the second semester are spent in the 
laboratory. In the laboratory students work in small groups 
with complete sets of apparatus. The work is arranged to 
illustrate fundamental principles and at the same time to fa- 
miliarize the student with methods employed in experim.ental 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 37 

physiology and medicine. The laboratory results are discussed 
at informal conferences. The subjects covered in the didactic 
and laboratory work include muscle, nerve, electro-physiology, 
blood, lymph, circulation, respiration, digestion, absorption, se- 
cretion, nutrition, internal secretions, nervous system and spe- 
cial senses. A considerable part of the laboratory work is 
upon mammals. Consultation of original papers at the library 
is required and current articles are discussed. 

2. Clinical Physiology. During the second semester of 
the second year a one-hour clinic is held each week by the De- 
partment of Medicine to correlate physiology and medicine and 
serve as an introduction to the work of the clinical years. 

3. Research. Hours to be arranged. The facilities of the 
laboratory are available to qualified persons to undertake orig- 
inal investigations. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY. 

Frank W. Hatchel, M.D _ Professor of Bacteriology 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D Professor of Bacteriology 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D _ _ ...Instructor in Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D _ Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D _ Instructor in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the first year during the second semester. This 
includes the various method of preparation and sterilization of 
culture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bac- 
teriological examination of water and milk. The bacteriolog- 
ical diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also included in 
this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also 
studied in the laboratory. The principles of general bacteri- 
ology are taught by quiz, conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of 
quizzes conferences and lectures to the second year class 
throughout the first semester and practical experiments are 
carried out by the class in laboratory sessions of three hours 
each held twice weekly during the semester. 



38 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMSTRY. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D „ Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D _ _..... ..Instructor in Biological Chemistry 

Instruction in Biological Chemistry comprises laboratory- 
work, lectures and conferences. 

Laboratory Work. The first few weeks of the laboratory 
work consists in the preparation of normal and standard so- 
lutions which requires careful use of the analytical balance 
and of volumetric glassware. The knowledge gained in this 
preliminary period is then put to practical application in the 
making of quantitative determinations of nitrogenous com- 
pounds of known nitrogen content. Daily reports are required 
of each student in this work and a careful record is kept of his 
ability. 

At the end of this period there follows a long course of lab- 
oratory work on the chemistry and metabolism of the car- 
bohydrates, proteins and lipins. Each type of foodstuff is con- 
sidered separately; first its chemistry is studied and then its 
metabolism. In following this arrangement the usual long 
stretch of the pure chemistry of all the foodstuffs is eliminated. 

Experiments on the tissues of the body then follow, and 
precede the final group of experiments on bile, milk and those 
which relate to the more thorough study of blood and urine. 

Throughout the laboratory work the older methods have 
been excluded, and those tests which are duplications of the 
same principle have been reduced to a minimum. Quantitative 
tests include only those which are representative and essen- 
tial. A great deal of stress is laid upon the importance of 
quantitative and metabolic experiments, so that this type of 
work constitutes the major part of the laboratory experiments 
in this course. 

Lectures. The lectures precede or run parallel to the lab- 
oratory work, as far as possible. The first lectures deal with 
laboratory technic, the chemistiy of solutions and indicators, 
osmosis, the chemistry of colloids, catalysis, reversible reac- 
tions, the law of mass action and a discussion of enzymes. The 
lectures which follow refer to the chemistry and metabolism 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

of carbohydrates, proteins and lipins. Relatively less time is 
given to the discussion of the chemistry of the various food- 
stuffs and more to the discussion of their metabolism. In these 
lectures the fundamental principles (biological, physical and 
chemical ) are emphasized, not, however, to the exclusion of the 
correlation of the normal and abnormal metabolism. 

The final lectures relate to the discussions of the secretions, 
including milk, and of the blood and urine, including the meta- 
bolism of inorganic substances, salts and water. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA. 

William Henry Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

0. G. Harne, A.B _ _....- Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

Esther F. Kuhn, A.B _ „ Assistant in Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne _ ..Assistant in Pharmacology 

1. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 56 hours required. 

The methods now used in presenting the subject matter of 
Materia Medica and Prescription Writing have evolved as a 
result of some years of practical teaching. The science of 
Pharmacology has introduced methods of critical analysis in 
the choice of drugs proposed for use as medicine. As aids in 
determining the particular drugs chosen for study, use is 
made of the ''United States Pharmacopoeia" and ''New and 
Non-Official Remedies." 

Official titles, whenever practicable, are expressed in Eng- 
lish and all quantities are stated in terms of the metric system. 
The only way to get away from the unscientific system of Eng- 
lish weights and measures, and from a Latin system which 
few ever learn correctly is to refuse to teach either one of 
them. 

When possible, drugs are grouped according to their chem- 
ical composition and the influence of various radicals and side 
chains emphasized, whereas drugs, the chemistry of which 
is not definitely established, are grouped according to their 
dominant physiological action. Following the Pharmacology 
of a given group, their place in practical medicine is 
indicated, and the student is requested to prescribe same in 
suitable form. Thus a Materia Medica is developed through- 
out the course, based upon Pharmacological action of drugs. 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

2. Systematic Pharmacology, 96 hours required. Second 
year. In this portion of the course, the student is taught 
Pharmacology as a pure science. The aim is to attain a mean 
between that which has a purely scientific bearing and that 
dominantly practical so that both a critical attitude toward 
drugs, and an understanding of the principles of dosage may 
be acquired. This is accomplished by lectures, quiz, confer- 
ence and the following course of laboratory exercises. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. 96 hours. Second year. This lab- 
oratoiy course runs parallel with Pharmacology 2. Many of 
the most important problems of Immunology, Parasitic intoxi- 
cations, and of Chemotherapy are essentially Pharmacological. 
In the first part of the course the experiments are upon normal 
animals, hence primarily toxocological in character. In the 
latter part of the course more and more emphasis is laid upon 
what is now designated as the chemo-therapeutic index of 
drugs. 

4. Pharmacology of General and Local Anesthetics and So- 
porifics. Four weeks, 3 lectures, 3 laboratory periods a wedk. 
This is a special course designed to meet the needs of physician 
and graduate nurse who wish to acquire a knowledge of the 
more recent developments in the pharmacology of depressant 
and sleep producing drugs. The course is so arranged that 
those properly qualified may continue the work under expert 
anesthetists in the wards of the hospitals connected with the 
university. Professor Shultz. 

5. Research in Pharma<^ology and Chemo-Therapy. Prop- 
erly qualified students are admitted to the laboratory with a 
view to their carrying on original investigations in drug ac- 
tion. Thoroughly equipped laboratories are well adapted 
for post-graduate study and research in Pharmacology. Hours 
will be arranged to suit the applicant. Professor Schultz. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D _ „ Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, M.D _ Associate Professor of Pathology 

Wm. J. Carson, M.D _.._ „ Associate Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, MJD _ Instructor in Pathology 

M. Alexander No\'EY, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

.Lawrence S. OTEa^L, M.D Assistant in Pathology 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CUKRICULUM 41 

Courses of instruction in Pathology are given during the 
second and third years. These courses are based on previous 
study of normal structure and function and aim to outhne the 
natural history of disease. Instruction is made as practical 
as possible that the student may become familiar with the ap- 
pearance of tissues in disease and may be able to correlate 
anatomical lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology and Histo-Pathology. This course is 
given to second year students. It includes the study and dem- 
onstration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances of 
structure, nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of 
fat, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pig- 
ment metabolism, inflammation and tumors. The laboratory 
course consists in a daily preliminary talk on the subject for 
study, following which the student takes up the study of micro- 
scopical sections. Gross material from autopsy and from the 
museum is demonstrated in conjunction with the microscopical 
sections. 

2. Applied Pathology, Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. Third year students : In this course the 
special relationship of the gross and microscopical lesions to 
clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. Fresh material 
from autopsy collected at the various hospitals is demonstrated 
and supplemented by a study of the respective autopsy proto- 
cols. 

3. Autopsies, Third Year. Autopsy technic is taught to 
small groups of students by special instruction at autopsies 
performed at the various hospitals. Students are required to 
assist at the autopsy, study the organs, examine the micro- 
scopical sections, make cultures and prepare autopsy protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference, Fourth Year. In col- 
laboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from 
autopsies is studied with reference to the correlation of the 
clinical aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified stu- 
dents will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work 
along the lines of experimental pathology. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTOIENT OF I\IEDICINE. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D _ ...Professor of Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D _ .._ _ „.„ Professor of Medicine 

Gary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D _ ...Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D....Profes3or of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D _ Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D... „.... -..Professor of Clinical Medicine 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D. Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D _ .....Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

H. D. McCarty, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D. ..Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D ....Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

R. C. Metzel, M.D _ Associate in Clinical Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D „....Associate in Clinical Medicine 



L. a. M. Krause, M.D 

C. C. Habliston, M.D 

E. E. Mayer, M.D 

D. CoRBiN Streett, M.D 

J. W. Martindale, M.D 

Henry Sheppard, M.D...„ 

Bartus T. Baggott, M. D.... 

Leon Freedom, M.D 

H. R. Peters, M.D 

William Michel, M.D. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D _ 



Associate 

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Paul R. Rockwood, M.D _ Instructor 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D _ ^Assistant 

M. G. Gichner, M.D _ Assistant 



L. L. Gordy, M.D - 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D 



...Assistant 
...Assistant 
...Assistant 



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GENERAL OUTLINE. 

Second Year 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester). 
(2 hours a week, second semester). 

(b) Clinical lectures on pathological physiology. 

(1 hour a week, second semester). 



OKGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

Third Year. ' 

L The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient depart- 
ment and in the clinical laboratory. 

II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neu- 
rology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 

III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical 
therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year. 

The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks). 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical ex- 
amination, laboratory examinations and progress notes of as- 
signed cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Climes in general medicine and the medical specialties 
(6 hours a week). 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work. 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the Univer- 
sity Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each 
student spends two periods a week of two hours each in dis- 
pensary work. The work is done in groups of four to six stu- 
dents under an instructor. Systematic history taking is espe- 
cially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. The stu- 
dent becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic 
disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis. 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions in topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and 
each section receives instruction for four hours a week for the 
entire session in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The 
large clinical material of the dispensaries and hospitals is util- 
ized to give each student the opportunity to familiarize him- 
self with the common types of bodily structure, with the nor- 
mal variations in physical signs and with the physical signs of 
the chief pulmonary, circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

Tuberculosis. 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in 
physical diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sec- 
tions of the class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. 
Stress is laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the 
disease, as well as upon its symptomatology and gross 
pathology. 

Therapeutics. 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are 
taken up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the 
chief diseases is then reviewed. Two hours a week. Dr. 
Lockard. 

The principles of physical therapy are taught in a special 
lecture and demonstration course consisting of six one-hour 
periods. Dr. Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the prac- 
tical application of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching 
and the chief therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

clinical pathology. 

JOHN G. Huck, M.D (Head of Department 

/Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D _ ..Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. R. Miller, M.D. _ - .Associate Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D - _ Associate in Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D - Instructor in Medicine 

M. G. Gichner, M.D _ Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in 
the technique of th.e usual clinical laboratory work, so that he 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

is able to perform all routine examination which may be called 
for during his fourth year, in connection with the work in the 
wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic 
lectures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff 
of the department takes an active part. The microscopical 
and chemical study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric 
juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively taken up, 
and special attention directed to the clinical significance of 
the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting 
agent and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student is 
provided with a microscope, blood counters and hemoglobino- 
meter for his exclusive use, and every two students with a 
special laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has 
learned during the preceding year in the laboratories of the 
various affiliated hospitals. He is also supplied with a labora- 
tory outfit which is sufficiently complete to enable him to work 
independently of the general equipment. Special instructors 
are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. ...Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D „ ...Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D ...Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D....Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D _ Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D - Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Morgan, M.D Insti-uctor in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D ...„ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

N. J. Davidov, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

I. S. Zinberg, M.D _ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

W. E. Grempler, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph N. Zierler, M.D _ _ ..Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year. Clinics, recitations and demonstrations to 
the class for one hour a week throughout the session. Dispen- 



46 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



sary instruction to small groups throughout the entire session. 
Practical instruction in the differential and clinical diagnosis 
and demonstrations of the newer methods of diagnosis in gas- 
tro-intestinal affections. 



PSYCHIATRY. 



R, M. Chapman, M.D. _._. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D.... 
H. S. Sullivan, M.D 



Professor of Psychiatry 

-.„. Instructor in Psychiatry 

- - -..Associate in Psychiatry 



Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen 
clinical lectures and five clinics which are designed to be in- 
troductory to the more intensive work in psychiatry in the 
fourth year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical 
conferences on selected groups of cases. Each student works 
for a short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic 
and thus gains practical experience of the problems of history 
taking, examination, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



PEDIATRICS. 



John Ruhrah, M.D. .._ 

Charles L. Summers, M.D _ _ _ 

Edgar R. Friedenwald, M.D „ ^...Clinical 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D. _ ...Assistant 

W. H. INGRIM, M.D _ 

H. H. Warner, M.D _ „.. „ _ „_ _ 

W. J. Todd, M.D...: ._ „ 

John H. Traband, M.D „ 

William F. Geyer, M.D. _.._ __. 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D - -.- 

W. E. Brent, M.D _ 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D _... 

Bernard J. Ferry, M.D „ 



Charles Goldsborough, M.D _.„ 

George E. Wells, M.D.- _ _ 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D _ 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D 

H. J. DoRF, M.D „ -....- „ 

H. R. Lickle, M.D...._ 

F. B. Smith, M.D _ 

G. A. Knipp, M.D - „ 

J. J. McGarrell, M.D - „ 



.Professor of 
Professor of 
Professor of 
Professor of 
-.Associate 
....Associate 
.Instructor 
.Instructor 
.Instructor 
..Instructor 
..Instructor 
..Instructor 

Assistant 

.-.Assistant 
.-.Assistant 
—Assistant 

Assistant 

...Assistant 
..-Assistant 
.-..Assistant 
...Assistant 
...Assistant 



Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

W. E. Cole, M.D. _ ...Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. A. RuTLEDGE, M.D .._ - ...Assistant in Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. _ _ Assistant in Pedriatics 

Thelma V. Ow^N, M.D _ _..... _ Assistant in Pedriatics 

Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of 
one lecture each week in which infant feeding and the most 
important diseases of infancy and childhood are especially em- 
phasized. Drs. Ruhrah, Summers and Friedenwald. 

Fourth Year. During this year a weekly clinical lecture is 
given where the character of disease is fully demonstrated and 
the students are afforded an opportunity for personal exam- 
ination of all cases. In addition ward classes are held weekly 
where bedside instruction is given. A section of the class also 
works daily at the Babies' and Children's Clinic. This clinic, 
which is under the direction of Dr. Summers, has a yearly at- 
tendance of more than twenty thousand, and offers an excel- 
lent opportunity for study and observation of a wide variety 
of cases under competent instructors. 

Instruction is also given in the Children's Dispensary at the 
Mercy Hospital. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D ..Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D _ Associate Professor of Neurology 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D _ _ Associate in Neurology 

MiLFORD Le\^, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

J. A. SxLADOWSKY, M.D _ Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week 
to the entire class. By means of didactic lectures and clinical 
conferences there are considered the commoner tyipes of dis- 
eases of the nervous system, the methods of neurological ex- 
amination, and the relationship of signs and symptoms to 
pathological conditions. The material at University and Mercy 
Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference, one hour each week to 
the entire class. This subject is taught at the University and 
Mercy Hospitals. All cases presented at these clinics are care- 
fully examined ; complete written records are made by the stu- 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

dents who demonstrate the cases before the class. These cases 
are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are pre- 
sented, and each student in the class must prepare one or more 
cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction : In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in 
close personal contact with the cases in the wards under the 
supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction : Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four after- 
noons each week. In this way students are brought into con- 
tact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later 
manifestations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

BiRCKHEAD McGowAN, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

J. F. HoGAN, M.D „ _ .......Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. 
The lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: Air, 
Water, Soil, Food, Disposal of Wastes, Communicable Diseases, 
State and Federal Public Health Laws, and Industrial Diseases. 
Small groups visit the Sydenham Hospital weekly and are 
given practical instruction in the diagnosis, treatment and iso- 
lation of the contagious diseases. 

Fourth Year, Small groups visit the City Board of Health 
Laboratories for practical instruction in the laboratory field 
and pvdministrative aspects of public health work. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. Course of six lectures. 

Inasmuch as Medical Jurisprudence teaches the application 
of every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, 
civil or criminal, this course embraces the following: Proceed- 
ings in criminal and civil prosecution; medical evidence and 
testimony; identity in its general relations; sexual abnormali- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

ties; personal identity; impotence and sterility; rape; criminal 
abortions; signs of death; wounds in their medico-legal rela- 
tions ; death, natural and homicidal ; malpractice ; insanity and 
medico-legal autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D „...- Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D „ - Prof essor of Surgery 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D _ Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D - ...Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D ...Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D _ _ - ...Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D....Assoc'te Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D ...Associate Professor of Surgery 

E. H. Hayward, M.D „ Associate in Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D. . Associate in Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D. . . ... _ Associate in Surgery 

E. S. Johnson, M.D. _ . . Associate in Surgery 

C. A. Rkfschneider, M.D. Associate in Surgery 

H. M. Foster, M.D. . . Instructor in Surgery 

F. X. Kearney, M.D. . _ . . . Instructor in Surgery 
Charles W. Maxson, M.D. . _ . _ . Instructor in Surgery 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D. . . _ _. Instructor in Surgery 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. _ _ _ „ _ _ Instructor in Surgery 
Dwight Mohr, M.D. . _ _ ... Assistant in Surgery 
Wm. R. Geraghit, M.D. . _ .. Assistant in Surgery 
S. Demarco, M.D. _ _ - . _ _ _ Assistant in Surgery 
Clyde Marvel, M.D. . _ . ... Assistant in Surgery 

Everard Briscoe, M.D. Assistant in Surgery 

I. O. Ridgely, M.D. _____ .... Assistant in Surgery 

H. B. McElwain, M.D. _ . _ __ _ Assistant in Surgery 

C. F. HoRiNE, M.D. _ . . . Assistant in Surgery 

D. J. Passagno, M.D. . _ . ._ . Assistant in Surgery 
J. G. Onnen, M.D. . _ - . . Assistant in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D. . _ Assistant in Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D. . ... . . Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is in the Anatomical Laboratory and the dis- 
pensaries, v^ards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of 
the University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and 
dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospital. 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dis- 
pensary work, bed-side instruction, ward classes, and clinics. 
The work begins in the second year, and continues through- 
out the third and fourth years. 

Second Year. 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. 10 hours a week for 
the first semester. The course is designed to bridge the gap 
between anatomy in the abstract, and clinical anatomy as ap- 
plied to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and stu- 
dents are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and 
regions on the cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected 
when necessary to bring out outlines and relations of struc- 
tures. Didactic lectures two hours weekly, augmented by 
demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross-sections. 
Dr. Holland, assisted by Drs. Foster, Hanna, Brady and Ho- 
rine. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history taking, 
records of physical examinations and of operations and prog- 
ress notes ; the preparation of surgical dressings, suture mate- 
rials and solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, 
gangrene, fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage and shock; the use 
of splints, bed frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local 
anaesthesia and the prepartion of patients for operations. Lec- 
tures and conferences. 2 hours per week for one semester to 
the entire class. Dr. Edwards. 

Third Year. 

General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and 
general surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to 
the entire class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Dr. Shipley. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in 
history-taking, gross patholog}% and surgical diagnosis — at 
the bedside and in the deadhouse of the Baltimore City Hos- 
pital. Drs. Shipley, Lynn and Reifschneider. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative sur- 
gery upon the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

sections, and each section is given practical and individual 
work under the supervision of the instructors. Dr. Frank S. 
Lynn, assisted by Drs. Nathan Winslow, Locher, Hajrvvard, E. 
S. Johnson, Edwards, Foster, Reifschneider, Geraghty, De- 
marco, Kearney, Briscoe, Horine, Pessagno and Onnen. 

Fractures and DislocatioTis. Twenty-four hours to the en- 
tire class. This course consists of instruction in the various 
forms of fractures and dislocations and their treatment, and 
serves as a preparatory course for clinical work. Drs. Wise 
and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary, Under supervision, the student takes 
the history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the 
diagnosis, and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of 
the ambulatory surgical cases in the University and in the 
Mercy Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Ridg- 
ley, Passagno, Briscoe and McElwain. University Hospital — 
Drs. Holland, Lynn, Nathan Winslow, Edwards, E. S. Johnson 
and Foster. 

Fourth Year. 

Clinics, A weekly clinic will be given at the Mercy and at 
the University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the 
year. As far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy 
Hospital — Drs. Harrison and McGlannan. University Hospi- 
tal— Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the oper- 
ating-room and museum are studied in the gross and micro- 
scopically, in relation with the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treat- 
ment of accident cases, with instructions as to the relation- 
ship between the state, the employee, the employer, and the 
physician's duty to each. One hour a week to sections of the 
class throughout the year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of University and of 
Mercy Hospitals, history taking, and physical examination of 
patients, laboratory examinations, attendance at operations 
and observation of post-operative treatment. 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will 
consist of ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the 
after care of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Harri- 
son, McGlannan, Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Chambers. 
University Hospital — Drs. Shipley, Holland, Edmunds, Lynn 
and Edwards. 

ANAESTHESIA. 
Second Year. 

Lectures on history of anaesthesia: Ancient and Modern.. 
General physiology of anaesthesia. • Special physiology of each 
anaesthetic agent. Different methods for producing general 
anaesthesia, v/ith a detailed description of each. The selec- 
tion of the anaesthetic and method best suited for its admin- 
istration in particular cases. Difficulties and accidents during 
and follo\\ang anaesthesia, their causes, prevention and con- 
trol. Different methods of resuscitation. Blood pressure : Its. 
significance and bearing on selection of the anaesthetic and 
use as a guide during anaesthesia. 

Eight hours to the entire class. Drs. S. Griffith Davis and 
W. G. Queen. 

Fourth Year. 

During the climes and operations before small groups, each 
student will be required to observe the administration of an- 
aesthetics and to keep a chart recording blood pressure, pulse 
and respiration under the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D _ Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. . Associate in Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D. _ _ _ Associate in Dermatology 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D. . _ . . ._ Instructor in Dermatology 

A. C. Monninger, M.D. - _ . . Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases 
of the skin. Dr. Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital, Mondays, Wed- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

nesdays and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the 
common skin diseases. Drs. Abercrombie, Robinson and 
Gately. Dispensary instruction, Mercy Hospital. Dr. Rosen- 
thal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Oi-thopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D _ Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

H. L. Rogers, M.D _ Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient in- 
struction will be given. This instruction is provided in the 
University Hospital Amphitheater and in the Dispensary, 
Mercy Hospital and Dispensaiy and Kernan Hospital and In- 
dustrial School for Crippled Children at ''Radnor Park," and 
in the Dispensary of same at 620 West Lombard Street. 

Lectures, clinics and quizzes will be held at each of the hos- 
pitals once a week. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic will 
be held for small sections of the class at "Radnor Park." 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and in- 
struments required in this surgical specialty, including X-Ray 
interpretation; Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; 
defoiTTiities of the feet; non-tuberculous affliction of bone and 
joints ; the paralyses ; the bursal, tendinous and muscular con- 
ditions producing orthopaedic affections; rickets, scurvy; os- 
teomalacia; chondro-dystrophies ; wry-neck and the use and 
application of orthopaedic apparatus. 

ROENTGENOLOGY AND RADIOTHERAPY. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D _ ..- _ Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, M.D _ _ Professor of Roentgenology 

Charles Reid Edwards, A.B., M.D Associate in Radio Therapy 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D _ Associate in Roentgenology 

Instruction is given in the history, physics, and practical ap- 
plication of Roentgen Rays and Radium. Especial eifort is 
made to demonstrate the use of the Roentgen Ray in diagnosis 
by instruction in both fluoroscopy and plate reading. The sec- 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

tions of the fourth year class receive two hours instruction 
each week. 

The student is also taught the practical application of Rad- 
ium and Roentgen Rays as therapeutic agents. In the X-Ray 
laboratory and in the hospital wards students are shown the 
use of these agents in the treatment of disease. 



DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D ..Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D _._ Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

R. J. Kemp, M.D. _ Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the com- 
mon diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially 
directed to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance 
of focal infections in the etiology of general diseases and mod- 
ern methods of diagnosis. Lectures are illustrated by lantern 
Slides. Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily to small sec- 
tions at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student 
is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat practical 
cases under an instructor. Ward classes and clinical demon- 
strations are given one and one-half hours weekly throughout 
the session in the University and the Mercy Hospitals. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D _ Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Harris Goldman, M.D „.. „ Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. GiLLis, M.D.„ Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. K. Fargo, M.D _ Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. C. Knapp, M.D - _ „ Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. T. CoLLENBERG, M.D A.ssistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

J. H. COLLISON, M.D. .._ Assistant in Genito-Urinai-y Diseases 

Monte Edwards, M.D. ..Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 55 

Third Year. 8 hours to the entire class. This course is a 
didactic one in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. 
Toulson. 

Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystos- 
copy, ureter catheterization, renal functional tests, urography, 
urine cultures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the 
amphitheater, ward rounds, and attendance by members of 
the Senior class upon out patients in the dispensary. The dis- 
pensary classes are carried on both at the Mercy and the Uni- 
versity hospital dispensaries. In the latter institution, the 
Maryland State Department of Health conducts a venereal 
disease clinic, in which 22,346 visits were paid last year. 
Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered, and this 
rich wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. In 
addition to this, a cystocopic clinic is conducted in another 
part of the dispensary, where the students are given practical 
instruction in the modem diagnostic methods. 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. 6 hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rec- 
tum and anus, and will cover the essential features of the anat- 
omy and physiology of the large intestine as well as the vari- 
ous diseases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum. 

The class is divided into sections for clinical instruction in 
the Baltimore City Hospital. Dr. Linthicum. 

Fourth Year. Ward and Dispensary instruction is given 
in the University and Mercy Hospitals where different phases 
of the various diseases are taught by direct observation and 
examination. The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope 
and examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar 
to each student. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Blake and Rosenthal. 
University Hospital — Drs. Linthicum and Reeder. 



56 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D _ Professor of Obstetrics 

George W. Dobbin, M.D _..... ...Professor of Obstetrics 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D ...Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D _ Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D ....Associate Professor of Obstertics 

J. McF. Bergland, M.D _ Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D. Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D _ ...Instructor in Obstetrics 

Dudley Plela.sants Bo'^t:, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D _ Assistant in Obstetrics 

J. J. Erwin, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

M. Alexander No\"EY, A.B., M.D. ..Assistant in Obstetrics 

Isadore H. Siegel, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Thelma V. Owen, M.D _ _ ...Assistant in Obstetrics 

ThiPvD Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by 
Drs. Dobbin, Bergland, Novak and Rowland to entire class. 
Manikin Work, Drs. Brack, Smith and Erv\an to sections of 
class at Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Reese, Bowe, 
Novey and Rov\^land at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week, 
Drs. Rowland, Douglass, Murray and Lazenby. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sec- 
tions of class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese, 
Bowe, Novey and Rowland at University Hospital. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY. 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D. _ Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

HuGH Brent, M.D _ Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D ...Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Geo. a. Strauss, M.D. -..Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D „ Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D _ Assistant in Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. ...Assistant in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D _ _ _ Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Work. A course of thirty lectures- 
and recitations. 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in 
the ward, makes a general physical examination, including 
the blood and urine, before the patient is brought before the 
class. One student under supervision gives the anaesthetic, a 
pelvic examination is made by six students, and any operation 
required is then done before a section of the class small enough 
to see clearly what is being done and how it is done. On a sub- 
sequent day the whole group examine microscopically sections 
prepared from material removed from patients that have been 
before them. 



DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D....Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D .._ Clinical Professor of Otology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D „ _ _ ...Associate in Ophthalmology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D _ Associate in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Course in Diseases of the Eye, Sept. 28th to 
January 23rd. Dr. Harry Friedenwald. 

s 

Course in Diseases of the Ear, Sept. 28th to January 23rd. 
Dr. Downey. 

Practical Course in Ophthalmoscopy, once weekly, in sec- 
tions. Dr. Kemler. 

Fourth Year. Clinics in Diseases of the Eye and Ear, 
weekly. Drs. Harry Friedenwald and Downey. 

Ward Studies of ocular and aural lesions associated with 
general medical diseases, once weekly in sections. Dr. Fried- 
enwald. 

Dispensary Instruction, daily to small sections. Drs. Kahn, 
Fleck, Downey and Kemler. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are designed to 
familiarize the students with the common diseases of the eye 
and ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view, to meet 
the needs of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is 
laid upon the relation between diseases of the eye and the ear 
and systemic diseases and diseases of other organs. 



58 SCHEDULE 

FIUST YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 
9 to 10 


HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY LABORATORY 
P. & S. 32 


Histology 
P. & S. 34 


Dissecting 
A. H. and 


10 to 11 


Embryology 
P. & S. 34 


11 to 
12.00 


Histology & 
Embryology 
Laboratory 
P. & S. 32 


Histology 
P. & S. 34 


Histology & 
Embryology 
Laboratory 
P. & S. 32 


Histology 

and 

Embryology 

Laboratory 
P. & S. 32 


Bacteriology 
P. & S. 34 


Laboratory 




12 M. 

to 
1 P.M. 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Bacteriology 
P. & S. 34 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




lto2 


Anatomy 
A. H. & C. H. 


Anatomy 
A. H. & C. H. 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




2to4 


Dissecting 
Laboratory 


Dissecting 
A. H. and 
Laboratory 


Dissecting 
Laboratory 


Dissecting 
A. H. and 
Laboratory 


Dissecting 
A. H. and 
Laboratory 




4 to 6 









Classes in Anatomy and Dissecting at Lombard and Greene Streets ; all other classes at Calvert 
and Saratoga Strets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — ^N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Anatomical Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory — Lombard and Greene Streets. 

P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert andl Saratoga Streets. Rooms /Indicated on Second Floor. 



FIF^T YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 

9.30 


HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY LABORATORY 
P. & S. 32 


Histology 
P. & S. 34 


Dissecting 


Embryology 
P. & S. 34 


9.30 to 
10.30 


A. H. and 

Laboratory 


10.30 
11.30 


Physiology 
P. & S. 34 


Embryology 
P. & S. 34 


Physiology 
P. & S. 34 


Bacteriology 
P. & S. 34 


Physiology 
P. & S. 24 




11.30 to 
12.00 


LUNCH 




P.M. 

12 to 2 


BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY 
P. & S. 32 




2 to 2.30 


TRANSFER 




2.30 to 
*5.30 




ANATOH 
A. 1 


lY AND DISS 
[I. and Laboral 


ECnNG 
ory 







Classes in Anatomy and Dissecting at Lombard) and Greene Streets; all other classes at Calvert 
and Saratoga Streets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N, E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Anatomical Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory — Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated en Second Floor. 
• Neural Anatomy after April 10th. 



SCHEDULE 
SECOND YEAR— First Semester 



59 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Satuday 


A.M. 
9 to 10 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section A 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section B 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Physiology 
L.B. 1 


10 to 11 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


BioloKical 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


11 to 
12.00 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Immunology 
A.H. 


12.00 to 
12.30 


Lunch 


LUNCH AND TRANSFER PERIOD 


12-1 

Pathology 
A.H. 


P.M. 

12.30 


Laboratory 
Pharmacology 
Section A or B 


Laboratory 

Immunology 
and Serology 

P. & S. 32 


Medicine 
P. & S. 34 


Immunology 
P. & S. 34 


2.30 


1-1.30 
Lunch 


2.30 
3.30 


Surgery 
P. & S. 34 


Surgery 
P. & S. 34 


S.30 
to 
6.30 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S 33 and 

Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

P. & S. 33 and 

Laboratory 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section 

Bor A 





Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 12.30 to 5.30, at Calvert and 
Saratoga Streets; all other classes at Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
L. B. 1 — Law Building — First Floor, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 





SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester 




Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section A 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 
Section B 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Physiology 
L. B. 1 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


10.30 to 
11.30 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A-H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


11 to 12 

Pathology 

A.H. 


11.30 to 
12.00 


LUNCH 


Medical Clinic 
Amp. 


P.M. 

12 to 2 


PATHOLOGY LABORATORY 




2 to 3 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section A 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 
Disp. 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section B 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 




3to4 




4 to 5 







All classes at Lombard and Green Streets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

L. B. — Law Building — First Floor, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Aaaphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 



60 



SCHEDULE 
THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 



Hoiirs 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday j Saturday 

i 


A.M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Therapeutics 
C.H. 


Pathology 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Pathology 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Obstetrics 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Therapeutics 
C.H. 


16.30 to 

1 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lxmch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 

Surgery 

Dispensary 
Lunch 


1 to2 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 33 


Obstetrics 
P. & S. 33 


Gynecology 
P. & S. 33 


Transfer 


2.15 
to 
4.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


2.30-4.30 
Section A 
Clinical 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Gross 
Pathology 
at Bay View 


Clinical 
Pathology 
Laboratory 

P. & S. 34, 32 


Clinical 
Pathology 
Laboratory 

P. & S. 34, 32 


2-4 
Section B 
Clinical 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Gross 
Pathology 

at Bay View 


4.15 
to 
5.15 


Pediatrics 
A. H. 


Eye and Ear 
C.H. 


2.15-4.15 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
Practical 

Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 
Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 
P. & S. 34 


Preventive 
Medicine 

P. & S. 34 




From 10 
Calvert an 
C. H.— C 
A. H.—J 
Amp. — A 
P. & S.- 

At the 1> 
University 
2.30-4.30 P 


30 A.M. to 1. 
d Saratoga Str 
hemical Hall- 
anatomical Hal 
mphitheatre — L 
-N. W. Cor. C£ 

eginning of the 
Hospital on \ 
. M. 


OO P.M. the c 
eets, the other 
N". E. Cor. Lore 
— N. E. Cor. I 
Iniversity Hosp 
ilvert and Sara 

second semest^ 
Wednesdays. 2.1 


lass is divided 
at Lombard ai 
bard and Gree 
x)mbard and G 
ital, S. W. Co 
toga Streets. 

=v Section "A" 
5-4.15 P.M.: 


into tv?o secti< 
id Greene Stre 
ne Streets, 
reene Streets. 
r. Lombard an 
Rooms indicate 

at Bay View < 
Section "B" a 


3ns, one seetio 
ets. 

d Gi'eene Stre 
d on Second Fl 

>n Saturdays, 1 
t Bay View o 


n reporting at 

3t3. 

oor. 

-4 P. M.. and 
1 V/ednesdays, 

1 



SCHEDULE 
FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 



61 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 
11.00 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgerj- 

Gynecology 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

GjTi ecology 


11. CO 

to 
12.00 


Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec 51 


Medical 

Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 

Surgical 

Pathology 

P. & S. Sec. 46 


Clinical 
Pathological 
Conference 

Univ. Sec. C.H. 
P. & S. Sec. 33 


Surgical 
Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 
?. S: S. Sec. 51 


Medical 
Clinic 

Univ. ScT. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 33 


Pediatrics 

Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


P. :j. 

12 to 2 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 

Transfer 


Dispen5^r\- 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary- 
Lunch and 

Transfer 


Dispensary 
and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 


2.15 
to 
3.15 


Dermatology 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Neurology 
Clinic 

Univ. SecAmp. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


Eye and Ear 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Genito-L^rinary 

Clinic 

P. & S. Sec. 51 

Obstetrical 

Clinic 

Univ. Hosp, 

Amp. 


Gastro-Enter- 
ology Clinic 

(Full class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 




3.30 
to 

5.00 j 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Urology 

Eye and Ear 


V/ard Classes 

Therapeutics 

Proctology 

Radiotheraphy 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Roentgenology 

Preventive 

Medicine 


Ward Classes 
Medicine 

Orthopaedic 

Surgery 

Physical 

Therapeutics 


Ward Classes 

Neurology 

Nose & Throat 

Psychiatry 





The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
e other at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three gioups— Medical, Surgical, and Special. These 
oups v,ii! rotate on the following dates: 



FIRST SEMESTER 

1st period, Sept. 28th to Oct. 31st, 
2nd period, Nov, 2nd to Dec. 5th. 
3rd period, Dec. 7th to Jan. 23rd. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

1st period, Jan. 25th to Feb. 27th. 
2nd period, Mch. 1st to Apr. 10th. 
ord period, Apr. 12th to May 15th. 



C. H.— Chemical Hall— N. E. Cor, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 

P. & S., 33, S4 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51 — Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Strc-ets. 



62 ' REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Med- 
ical Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Regis- 
trar on the basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and 
is essential for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student 
Certificate are : 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school 
course or the equivalent, and in addition, at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits, 
including chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this Uni- 
versity. 

(A) HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS. 

Graduation from an accredited high or preparatory school 
after pursuing a four-year course based upon an eight-year 
elementary course or its full equivalent as demonstrated by 
entrance examinations. 

At least fifteen units must be offered. t 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED OR ACCEPTED 

FOR ENTRANCE TO THE PRE-MEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Subjects Units* Required 

Group I, English — 

Literature and Composition 3-4 3 

Group II, Foreign Languages — 

Latin .._.... _ -. 1-4] 

Greek _.... _...._ _ - -. 1-3 I 2f 

French or German 1-4 | 

Other foreign languages „ .._ 1-4) 



Chemistry 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 63 

Group III, Mathematics — 

Elementary algebra. - - 1 ^ 

Advanced algebra - ^--1 

Plane geometry - ^ ^ 

Solid geometry ^^ 

Trigonometry '"^ 

Group IV, History— 

Ancient history 1 

Medieval and modern history - 1 

English history 1 

American history V2-I 

Civil government - ^/^-1_ 

Group V, Science — 

Botany ^^-1 

Zoology ^^-1 

1 



Physics 1 

Physiography ^-1 

Physiology ^-1 

Astronomy - - ^'s 

Geology %-l 

Group VI, Miscellaneous — 

Agriculture 1-2 

Bookkeeping - ^2-1 

Business law "^ 

Commercial geography %-l 

Domestic science 1-2 

Drawing, freehand and mechanical %-2 

Economics and economic history. %-l 

Manual training 1-2 

Music: Appreciation or harmony 1-2 

*A unit is the credit value of at least thirty-six weeks' work of four 
or five recitation periods per week, each recitation period to be not less 
than forty minutes. In other words a unit represents a year's study in 
any subject in a secondary school constituting approximately a quarter 
of a full year's work. A satisfactory year's work in any subject cannot 
be accomplished under ordinary circumstances in less than 120 sixty- 
minute hours, or their equivalent. 

fBoth of the required units of foreign language must be of the same 
language, but the two units may be presented in any one of the lan- 
guages specified. 

J Of the fifteen units of high school work, nine units are required, as 
indicated in the foregoing schedule; the remainder may be made up 
from any of the other subjects in the schedule, provided that at least 
eleven units must be offered in Groups 1-V. 



64 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two 
college sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual in- 
struction, including final examinations. 

h. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this 
preliminary college course shall be equal to the work done in 
the freshman and sophomore years in standard colleges and 
universities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in 
physics, chemistry, biology, and English, each course to em- 
brace at least six, eight or twelve hours of work in each sub- 
ject, as shown in the schedule following. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PRE-MEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE. 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Seryiester 
Required Courses: Hours 

Chemistry ( a ) - - ,....-.. 12 

Physics (b) _..... - 8 

Biology (c) -...-.. - — 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) „ 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 

A modern foreign language. 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy. 
Psychology. 
Social science. 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting 
of one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less 
than fifty minutes* duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work 
to be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required, of which 
at least eight semester hours must be in general inorganic 
chemistry, including four semester hours of laboratory work. 
In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis 
may be counted as general inorganic chemistry. The remain- 
ing four semester hours required shall consist of work in or- 
ganic chemistry. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 65 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at 
least two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes 
a knowledge of plane trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four 
must be laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied 
by a course of eight semester hours in either general biology 
or zoology, or by courses of four semester hours each in zool- 
ogy and botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual in- 
troductory college course of six semester hours, or its equiva- 
lent, is required. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

A combined seven years' curriculum is ofl^ered, leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The 
first three years are taken in residence at College Park, and 
the last four years in Baltimore, at the School of Medicine. 
The premedical curriculum constitutes the first two years' 
work and the third year follows a general outline of pre- 
scribed and elective courses approved by the chairman of the 
premedical committee and the dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School 
of Medicine, and uix)n the recommendation of the dean, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences at College Park. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this 
combination course offers over the minimum requirements of 
the two years. By completing three years the training may 
be gradually broadened by a wider latitude in the election of 
courses in the arts subjects. 

POST-€RABUATE STUDENTS- 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the 
senior year without being candidates for the degree and, there- 
fore, without examination, may receive a certificate of at- 
tendance on completing the full course satisfactorily. 



66 RULES AND FEES 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine are the same as those enforced against undergradu- 
ates admitted to advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses — In the April number of 
the Bulletin detailed announcement will be made of the Post- 
graduate Summer Courses. 

RULES. 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the 
course he must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation 
at the end of the fourth year will be required to repeat the en- 
tire course of the fourth year and to take examinations in such 
other branches as may be required, should he be again per- 
mitted to enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be 
taken into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results 
of his examination. 

5. All first, second and third year students entering the 
School of Medicine of the University of Maryland are required 
to provide themselves with microscopes of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, 
Spencer Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attach- 
ments, will fill the requirements : 

Triple nose piece. 10 x and 5 x Oculars. 

Wide aperture stag«. 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives. 

Quick screw condenser (Abbe). 1.9mm. 1.25 N.A. Oil Immersion 

Lens. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate 
to the year ending June 5, 1926, only. The right is reserved 
to make changes in the curriculum, the requirements for grad- 
uation, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever the 
Faculty deem it expedient. 



RULES AND FEES 67 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid once) _ - - $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 250.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents - 300.00 

Laboratory fee (each year)„ 10.00 

Special and re-examination fee_.. - ... ., 5.00 

Graduation fee -.. 10.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution in any class for the session beginning September 28, 
1925. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to regis- 
ter at the Registrar's office. The last date of registration is 
October 5, 1925. 

Matriculation, laboratory and tuition fees for the first sem- 
ester shall be paid at the time of registration, and for the sec- 
ond semester on or before February 6th, 1926. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar 
the student from attendance on classes and other privileges of 
the University. 

Students who fail to pay the tuition and other fees, 
on or before the last day of registration, for each term or 
semester, as stated in the catalogue, will be required to pay 
as an addition to the fees required the sum of Five ($5.00) 
Dollars and if the pajnnent so required shall not be paid before 
twenty (20) days from the beginning of said term or semester, 
the students name shall be stricken from the rolls. 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident stu- 
dents, if at the time of their registration, their parents or 
guardians have been residents of this state for at least one 
year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at 
the time of their first registration they have been residents of 
this state for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the 
time of his first registration in the University and may not 
thereafter be changed by him unless his parents or guardians 
move to and become legal residents of this State. 



68 PEIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE. 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the 
highest average during the four years of his course. Certifi- 
cates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates standing 
next highest. 

DR. JOSE L. HIRSH MEMORIAL PRIZE. 

A prize of $50.00 is given each year by Mrs. David Myers 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsh, formerly Professor 
of Pathology in this School, to the student in the third year 
who has done the most satisfactory work in Pathology during 
his second and third years. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an 
alumnus of this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University each year upon nomination by the Medical 
Council, *'to a medical student of the University of Maryland, 
who, in the judgment of said Faculty, is of good character and 
in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical 
course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student, who has successfully completed one year's work in 
this school, and no student may hold such scholarship for more 
than two years. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 69 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

(Value, $125.00 each) 

Two scholarsnips were established from a bequest to the 
School of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M. D., 
an alumnus of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of 
the Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by 
the Medical Council to students who have meritoriously com- 
pleted the work of at least the first year of the course in m.edi- 
cine, and who present to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of 
a good moral character and of inability to continue the course 
without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Wins- 
low, M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Coun- 
cil, to "a needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore 
Class of the Medical School." 

*'He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all 
his work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

*'He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assist- 
ance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship. 

(Value, $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlin- 
sky as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, 
an alumnus of the University. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Coun- 
cil, to "a needy student of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore 
Class of the Medical School." 



70 SCHOLARSHIPS 

''He must have maintained an average grade of 85 per cent, 
in all his work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy 
the Medical council that he is worthy of and in need of as- 
sistance." 

The University Scholarships. 

Two Scholarships are awarded by the University. One to a 
student of the Department of Liberal Arts appointed by the 
President to be held for only one year; the other, which en- 
titles the holder to exemption from payment of the tuition fee 
of the year, is awarded annually by the Medical Council to a 
student of the Senior Class who presents to the Medical Coun- 
cil satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character 
and is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the 
course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship. 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late 
Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption 
from payment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to 
a third year student who at the end of the second year passes 
the best practical examination in Anatomy, Physiology, Bio- 
logical Chemistry, Pharmacology, Pathology, Immunology 
and Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships. 

(Valuation $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from 
the income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence 
Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions : These scholarships will be available 
to students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. 
Preference is given to students from the counties of the State 
of Maryland which the Medical Council may from time to time 
determine to be most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, after 
graduation and a year's intemeship, agree to undertake the 



SCHOLARSHIPS 71 

practice of medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to 
which the student is accredited or in a county selected by the 
Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with 
the condition requiring him to practice in the county to which 
he is accredited by the Council, the money advanced by the 
Regents shall be refunded. A bond in the amount of $1,200, 
the expense of which is borne by the Fund, must be filed by 
the student accepting one of these scholarships for faithful 
performance of the conditions imposed. 

Israel and Cecilia E, Cohen Scholarship. 

(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen 
in memory of her parents, Israel & Cecilia E. Cohen. Terms 
and conditions : 

This scholarship will be available to students of any of the 
classes of the course in Medicine; preference is given to stu- 
dents of the counties of the State of Maryland which the Med- 
ical Council may from time to time determine to be most in 
need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving one of 
these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interne- 
ship, agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term 
of two years in the county to which the student is accredited, 
or in a county selected by the Council. 



ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual ap- 
pointments are made from among the graduates of the school : 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons. One Resident Obstetrician 

Two Resident Physicians. Thirteen Junior Residents on a Rotating 

One Resident Gynecologist. Service. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close 
of the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital 
for the summer months. 



72 APPOINTMENTS 



TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 



Chief Resident Physician. One Resident Gynecologist. 
Three Resident Surgeons. One Resident Obstetrician. 
One Resident Physician. Eight Junior Residents on a Rotating Service 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in 
Baltimore as in any large city in the United States. The fol- 
lowing estimates of a student's personal expenses for the 
academic year of eight months have been prepared by students, 
and are based upon actual experience. 

Iteins. 

Books - _ _ „.... 

College Incidentals _._ _._ 

Board, eight months _ .._ 

Room rent _ 

Clothing and laundry _.... 

All other expenses - _ 



Low 


Average Liberal 


$27 


48 75 


20 


20 20 


200 


250 275 


64 


80 100 


50 


80 150 


25 


50 75 



Total ...._ „...„. $386 $529 $695 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in 
the city by going direct to the School of Medicine on the Uni- 
versity grounds, N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, 
where the Superintendent of Buildings, who may be found at 
his office on the premises, will furnish them with a list of com- 
fortable and convenient boarding houses suitable to their 
means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks 
and drafts for students. 

For further inf orm.ation, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M. D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



MATRICULATES 1924-25 



73 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 1924-25. 

Fourth Year Class. 



Balcerzak, Stanley Paul Pennsylvania 

Briglia, Nicholas Natale. Pennsylvania 

Brown, Leo T District of Columbia 

Byerly, Marshall Paul North Carolina 

Cadle. William Rodman Maryland 

Cardinale, Pasquale F „...New Jersey 

Caso, Jose Porto Rico 

Clahr, Abraham Albert New York 

Coe, John Marburg. Maryland 

Coonan, Thomas Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Cope, Arthur Alexander. A.B. ..Pennsylvania 
Dodd, Benjamin Roscoe, A. B., North Carolina 
Dodge, Eva Francette, A.B. ..North Carolina 
Draper, Leonidas McFerrin, A.B. 

North Carolina 

Dreskin, Jacob Louis. New Jersey 

Eastland, John Sheldon, A.B New York 

Elgin, Lee William _ Maryland 

Ellis, Francis A., A.B Maryland 

Epstein, Harry Herman New York 

Everett, Franklin Redman Maryland 

Fancher, Henry Wilson, Jr., B.S., 

Connecticut 

Farber, Raphael _ Pennsylvania 

Fields, Abijah Clementa Alabama 

Fischman, Harold H New Jersey 

Friedman, Bernard. _ New York 

Fuchs, Abner M „ New York 

Gale, Louis Harry Pennsylvania 

Gaston, William Bryan West Virginia 

Gattens, Wilbur Elton, B.S Maryland 

Click, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Gurley, Hubert Taylor _... North Carolina 

Hall, Cecil Maurice, B.S West Virginia 

Hammond, Kent Cato, B.S West Virginia 

Herbert, Alpha Nathan. „ New Jersey 

Hertz, Ben New York 

Hofler, Ralph Hayes. North Carolina 

Howell, JameS Gerald, B.S Pennsylvania 

Hulla, Jaroslav. Maryland 

Jacobs, Morris Albert -...Maryland 

Keating, John Patrick. Connecticut 

Kimbrough, Joseph William, Jr., 

North Carolina 
Knotts, William Kenneth. Maryland 



Laus, Edward Raymond. New York 

Leibensperger, George Franklin, 

Pennsylvania 

Lennon, William Earle North Carolina 

Linde, Samuel Arthur Maryland 

London, DanieL New York 

Lowe, Claude Milton. Pennsylvania 

McAnally, Alfred Loomis. North Carolina 

Miller, Edgar Raymond, A.B,..Pennsylvania 

Minnefor, Charles A New Jersey 

Montani, Anthony Carmen, B.S Ohio 

Nataro. Joseph JMew Jersey 

Navarro, Vicente Aguirre, A.B., 

Philippine Islands 

Nelson, James Wharton, A.B Maryland 

Nock, Randolph Maxwell Maryland 

Oshrin, Henry New Jersey 

Pinsky, Myer Mordecai New Jersey 

Plassnig, Edwin, B.S Maryland 

Polizotti, Joseph Louis..- New Jersey 

Pulaski, Leo Edward Pennsylvania 

Rathsprecher, Isadore. New Jersey 

Reynolds, Knight, B.S West Virginia 

Richmond, Lewis Cass, Jr., A.B Kentucky 

Roberts, Bryan Nazer, A.B...North Carolina 

Sarnoff. Jack. _ New York 

Silverstein, Jacob Maurice New Jersey 

Simon, Joseph Ralph. Pennsylvania 

Simpson, Henry Hardy, A.B...North Carolina 

Sinton, William Allen _ Virginia 

Spelsburg. Walter William, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Sulman, William Richard. Pennsylvania 

Tomaiuoli, Michael Francis. New Jersey 

Turner, Thomas Bourne, B.S Maryland 

Vila-Morales, Jaime Porto Rica 

Visconti, Joseph Albert New Jersey 

Ward, Willia.m Titus, A.B North Carolina 

Wassersweig, Martin Max. Pennsylvania 

Widmeyer, Robert Samuel, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Wiener, Joseph...... _ -.New York 

Wilson, Paul Russell, B.S West Virginia 

Winstead, John Lindsay North Carolina 

Zimmerman, Charles C - Maryland 



74 



MATRICULATES 1924-25 



Third Year Qass. 



Alford, Ralph Judson, B.A,..North Carolina 

Anker, Harry..._ ~ Ohio 

Askin, Aaron John, A.B Jtfaryland 

Ballard, Margaret Byrnside....West Virginia 

Beachley, Jack Hensoru _ Maryland 

Berry, Robert Alford. Georgia 

Blough, Homer Chester, B.S Pennsylvania 

Bronstein, Irving...- „ — New York 

Calvin, Warren Ellwood, B.S Maryland 

D'Angelo, Antonio France6co....Rhode Island 

DeVincentis, Henry New Jersey 

Diamond, H, Elias, B.S — New York 

DiPaula, Frank Rosario, A.B Maryland 

Dyer, Newman Houghton, B.S., 

West Virgimia 

Eanet, Paul „ J)istrict of Columbia 

Edmonds, Charles William Maryland 

Elliott, Julian Carr, A.B Virgrinia 

England, Welch, B.S _ West Virginia 

Fine, Morris Aaron Maryland 

Finkelstein, Abraham Harry New York 

Freedman, Herman New Jersey 

Freedman, Max New Jersey 

Freuder, Arthur Nathan J^ew York 

Geraghty, Francis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Gerber, Isadore Earle, A.B Maryland 

Gordon, Abel, B.A. — New Jersey 

Gorham, Herbert Jenkins. North Carolina 

Graham, John Wirt, B.A Maryland 

Helfond, David Mathew, B.S New York 

Hendrix, Nevins Byford, A.M Maryland 

Hibbitts, John Thomas. „ Maryland 

Hyman, Colvin, A.B _ -Maryland 

Jensen, Jacob Roed, B.S _ Denmark 

Johnson, Phil, B.S West Virginia 

Jolaon, Meyer Stanley, A.B — Maryland 

Knapp, Alphonse, Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Erosnoff, John Alexander, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Lavy, Louis Theodore Maryland 

Leake, Everette Majjette. North Carolina 

Levin, H. Edmund, B.S — Maryland 



Levin, Isadore Leonard, A.B OhM 

Levin, Joseph _ New Jersey 

Loftin, William Frank English, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Lumpkin, Lloyd Uber, B.S -...Maryland 

Lusby, Frank Farrier, A.B. Maryland 

Manginelli, Emanuel _ New York 

Merkel, Walter Clarence, A.B...Pennsylvania 

Miller, Harry G _ J^ew York 

Misenheimer, Ed Alexander..North Carolina 

Moriconi, Albert FranciSw New Jersey 

Polsue, William Clewell West Virginia 

Rattenni, Arthur - -...Rhode Island 

Rocco, Frank. - New Jersey 

Rosenberg, Albert Abraham....Pennsylvania 

Rosenfeld, Max Harry, A.B -...Maryland 

Rothberg, Abraham S., B.S „....New York 

Sashin, David. New York 

Sax, Benjamin J _ J^ew York 

Schenker, Paul Maryland 

Schmuckler, Jacob New Jersey 

Schneider, David, A.B -Maryland 

Schuman, William, A.B Maryland 

Schwartz, Ralph Alfred. New Jersey 

Scullion, Arthur Anthony, B.S..J^ew Jersey 
Sherman, Elizabeth Bowman, A.B...Virginia 

Spano, Fi^nk „ J>Jew Jersey 

Tayloe. Gordon Bennett, B.A., 

North Carolina 

Tayntor, Lawis Olds, Pc.C Pennsylvania 

Teagarden, Ersie Van, B.S West Virginwi 

Teitelbaum, Maurice L New York 

Tobias, Herbert Ramsay.— Maryland 

Totterdale, William Grainger, A.B., 

Maryland 

Trubek, Max, A.B - -..New Jersey 

Weinstein, Samuel _ New Jersey 

Weiss, Louie Leo ...New Yodt 

Weseley. Louis Jerome .New York 

Whicker, Guy Lorraine, B.A., 

North Carolina 
Wolfe, Samuel Benjamin Maryland 



MATRICULATES 1924-25 



75 



Second Year Class, 1924-1925. 



Adzima, Joseph Matthew Connecticut 

Aptaker, Albert Jack New York 

Armacost, Joshua Harper _ Maryland 

Bankhead, John Marion, B.S., 

South Carolina 

Barnett, Edwin Dwight. A.B California 

Basil, George Chester, Ph. G Maryland 

Belsky, Hyman New Jersey 

Benesunes, Joseph George, A.B Maryland 

Bialostosky, Julius, B.S New York 

Bimbaum, Joseph Osias New York 

BIcch, Adolph JNew Jersey 

Cadden, John Francis, Jr West Virginia 

Carey, Thomas Nelson „ Maryland 

Castronovo, Joseph. Rhode Island 

Chase, William Wiley, A.B Maryland 

Clemson, Earle Princeton...- -...Maryland 

Cohen, Bernard J., Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Morris Daniel New York 

Davis, Henry Vincent Maryland 

Donchi, Sol Marvin, B.S New Jersey 

Eliason, Harold William West Virginia 

Feldman, Jacob _ _...New York 

Friedman, Meyer Henry New Jersey 

Cellar, Abraham. B.S _ New York 

Gill. Charles Edward „ Delaware 

Gillis, Francis Winfred. -Maryland 

Ginsberg, Henry Maryland 

Glass, Louis Joseph, Ph. G Maryland 

Click, Bernard „ New Jersey 

..New Jersey 
.. J^^ew York 



Goldberg, Isidore... 
Golstein, Milton Joseph.., 



•Grossfeld, Michael Joseph Maryland 

Heisley, Rowland S Maryland 

Hewitt. John Frank, A.B -...Maryland 

Hummel, Ira Lee Cottrell..— New Jersey 

Jones, Ora Reed.: _ Ohio 

Kahan, Philip J _ New York 

Kams, Clyde Filmore, B.S Maryland 

Kaufman, Israel, B.S New York 

Klawans, Maurice Francis. Maryland 

Kutner, Charles New Jersey 

Lassman, Samuel, B.S New York 

Lazow, Sol M New York 

Lenson, Byruth King (Mrs.) Maryland 



Leyko, Julius Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lilly, Gofi Piatt West Virginia 

*Matassa, Vincent Louis. Maryland 

Mattikow, Bernard, B.S New York 

*Michel, George Charles Maryland 

Moran, John Edward. Ph-G..New Hampshire 

Morris, Frank Kailer, A.B Maryland 

Nussbaum. Samuel New York 

Peake, Clarence William Kentucky 

Phillips, John Roberts, A.B Maryland 

Reifschneider, Herbert E., A.B Maryland 

Rich, Benjamin Sunderland, A.B. ..Maryland 

Roetling, Carl Paul - Maryland 

Ruiz, Emilio M., B.S -...Porto Rico 

Saffell, James Glen. — Maryland 

Schnierer, Samuel Benjamin....Connecticnt 

Schwedel. John Bernard...- Maryland 

Slagle, Alexander Russell, A.B Maryland 

Smith, Paul L Pennsylvania 

Sobkov, Samuel — — Maryland 

Sparta, Anthony - Pennsylvania 

Stacy, Theodore Edwin, Jr., Ph.G., 

Pennsylvania 
Stonesifer, Charles Hiram, A.B...Maryland 

Susser, Max Herman New Jersey 

Swank, James Levy, B.S Pennsylvania 

Swartzwelder, Wallace Ray Pennsylvania 

Teague, Francis Bailey - Virginia 

Tenaglia, Entimio Domenico....Rhode Island 

Thompson, Thomas Payne, A.B Maryland 

Tollin, Louis -.._ —..New Jersey 

Tumminnello. Salvatore Anthony..Maryland 

Upton, Hiram Eugene, B.S Vermont 

Voigt, Herman Albert. Ph.G Maryland 

Von Schulz, Augustine Paul Maryland 

Wack, Frederic Van Deursen, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Waesche, Frederick Seton, A.B Maryland 

Whittington, Claude Thomas..North Carolina 
Williams, Palmer Francis Castiglione, 

B. S - Maryland 

Wilner, Joseph Walter...- -...New York 

Wohlreich, Joseph Jacob - New Jersey 

Wollak, TTieodore- Maryland 



* Did not complete year. 



76 



MATRICULATES 1924-25 



Rrst Year Class, 1924-1925. 



Aiau, Chadwick Kanekoa... _ _ T. H. 

Albaugh, Guy Clinton. — ^...Pennsylvania 

Baer, Adolph _ New York 

Bedri Marcel Rechtman. Palestine 

Benson, Alvan Homer Mar>land 

Berger, William Adolph, B.S New Jersey 

Bemhard, Robert,. — New York 

Blecherman, Irving Ezra. _ New York 

Bonelii, Nicholas William -...New Jersey 

Brager, Simon Maryland 

*Brocato, Charles Vincent. Maryland 

Brown, Nellie Madeleine. Pennsylvania 

Chor, Herman, A.B Maryland 

Christian, William Pennsylvania 

Dailey, Cornelius Michael Pennsylvania 

DeBarbieri, Fred Louis, A.B. ..Pennsylvania 
Duckwall, Frederick Mooman..West Virginia 
*Engelke, Edmvind Harrison, B.S... Maryland 

Fedder, Eli, Ph.G...._ Maryland 

Fifer, Jesse Showalter, A.B Delaware 

Friedman, Bernard _ New York 

Gaffney, Charles Bernard Connecticut 

Gaskins, Theodore Grady North Carolina 

Gelber, Jacob Saul — New York 

Giocolano, Ralph Gabriel New York 

Goldberg, Victor, Ph.G...._ „...Maryland 

Goodman. Jerome Edward, Ph. G... Maryland 

Greenberg, Harry, Ph.G~ Maryland 

Grollman, Aaron Isaac, B.S — Maryland 

Guiglia, Sascha Facchetti „ New York 

Giilck. George Krohn, B.S Denmark 

Gundry, Lewis Perkins, A.B „... Mainland 

Hankin, Samuel Jacob. Maryland 

Hayden, Benjamin Stephen, Jr Maryland 

Herold, Lewis Jacob, Ph.G „.. J^ew York 

Johnton, Walter Brenaman, A.B. ..Maryland 

Jones, Henry Alvan, Ph.G Maryland 

Kaminsky, Philip.„ New York 

*Kemp, Alexander Brown. Maryland 

Kohn, Theodore _ South Carolina 

♦Krolicki, Thaddeus Alphonsus..Connecticut 

Lampert. Hyman „ New York 

Lamstein, Jacob Irving, B.S New York 

Laukaitis, Joseph George Maryland 

*Lazarua. Max. _ New Jersey 

Lemer, Morria New York 

Levinsky, Maurice. — Connecticut 

Levinaon, Louis Jack. _ J^ew York 

Levy, Walter Howard. New York 

Limbach, Earl Frederick, A.B _ Ohio 

Little, Luther Emmanuel, Ph.G Maryland 

Littman, Irving I „ _ Maryland 

Lyon, Isadore Bernard, A.B Maryland 

Mace, John, Jr., B.S _ Maryland 

Maddi, Vincent Michael, A.B New York 

Maged. Abraham John, A.B New York 

* Did not eompleta rear. 



Matrjmura, JunichL _ T. H. 

McCeney, Robert Sadler, A.B Maryland 

McFaul, William Neal, Jr., A.B...Maryland 

McGowan, Joseph Francia Pennsylvania 

McKee, Albert Vincenl Pennsylvania 

Meister, Aaron _...New York 

Merksamer, David, A.B _...New York 

Merlino, Frank Anthony J>Tew Jersey 

Messina, Vincent Michael _ Maryland 

*Moore, Charles Mortimore. Virginia 

Mostwill, Ralph... .„ New Jersey 

*Nagle, Carl Rotan _ Maryland 

Neuman, Finley Frederick, A.B Ohio 

*Pass. Victor Earl, Ph. G Maryland 

Pegues, William Leak, A.B. ..South Carolina 

Piacentine, Pasquale Anthony New York 

Pileggi, Peter New Jersey 

Postrel, Lewis Louis...„ New Yoric 

Rascoff, Henry _ New York 

Repasky, John. - _ Ohio 

Rosen, Marks Julius. _ Nerw York 

♦Ross, Arthur Isaaa New York 

Rub«istein, Hyman Solomon, Ph.G., 

Maryland 

Rutter, Joseph Howard. Florida 

Saffron, Morris Harold, A.B 3few Jersey 

Sardo, Samuel Philip Pennsylvania 

Silver, Abraham Alfred. Connecticut 

Singer, Jack Jerome. — J»Iaryland 

Smith, Lazarus -...New York 

Smoot, Aubrey Cannon, A.B Maryland 

Smoot, Merril Clayville, B.S Maryland 

Stone, Jesse Edwin, A.B „ Maryland 

Tannenbaum, Morris, B.S New York 

Taylor, Charles Vivian, A.B -...Maryland 

Tenner, David, Ph.G Maryland 

Tkach. Nathan HersK.._ _ New York 

Varney, William Henry Maryland 

Vemaglia, Anthony Paul Joseph..New York 

Vogel, S. Zachary „ New York 

Volenick, Leon Joseph. - New York 

Walter, Frank Pieroa _ - Maryland 

Ward. Hugh Walter, A.B...._ Maryland 

Warner, Carroll Gardner, A.B Maryland 

Weintraub, Fred Siearfried. B.S.. 

Pennsylvania 

Weisenfeld, Nathan, B.S ^...Connecticut 

Weiss, Aaron- -.._ _...New York 

♦White, Beulah May (Miss) Maryland 

Wilkerson, Albert Russell, Ph.C.Maryland 

Wolf, Frederick Samuel Maryland 

Woolley, Alice Stone (Miss), B.S...Maryland 

Wurzel, Milton - - New Jersey 

Zimmerman, Frederick Thomas, A.B.. 

Pennsylvania 



MATRICULATES 1924-25 77 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SESSION OF 1924-25. 

College of Agriculture - - - — 266 

College of Arts and Sciences _ - — 354 

School of Business Administration - -...- _.. 620 

(Regular _.... 230 

I Extension ._ _ 390 

School of Dentistry _ _ - 479 

College of Education :... „ — _.... 410 

( Regular -....„ , 97 

I Extension _..._ _ _ „ _„ 313 

College of Engineering „ _._ „.. 209 

Graduate School _.... -.. 74 

College of Home Economics _ .._ ...._.. 24 

School of Law „ _..... „. _ „ 550 

School of Medicine _ _ _ 354 

School of Nursing _ 99 

School of Pharmacy _ _ _ _ _„ 228 

Sunmaer School, 1924, College Park..... „ _ _ _ 486 

Summer School, 1924, School of Business Administration _ 52 

Total .._ :.... „_ _ 4205 

Duplications _.; .._ 160 

Net Total _ _ _ _ _._ 4045 



GRADUATES 1925 

GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

JUNE 6, 1925. 



Balcerzak. Stanley Paul Pennaylvania 

Briglia, Nicholas Natale. Pennsylvania 

Brown, Leo T District of Columbia 

Byerly, Marshall Paul North Carolina 

Cadle, William Rodman Maryland 

Cardinale, Pasquale F „ ^...New Jersey 

Caso. Jose _ „ Porto Rico 

Clahr. Abraham Albert. New York 

Coe, John Marburg. _ Maryland 

Coonan, Thomas Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Cope, Arthur Alexander. A.B...Penn3ylvania 
Dodd. Benjamin Roscoe. A.B.. 

North Carolina 
Dodge, Eva Francette, A.B...North Carolina 
Draper. Leonidas McFerrin, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Dreskin, Jacob Looia _ New Jersey 

Elastland. John Sheldon, A.B New York 

Elgin, Lee William Maryland 

Ellis. Francis A., A.B^ Maryland 

Epstein, Harry Herman New York 

Everett, Franklin Redman. — Maryland 

Fancher, Henry Wilson. Jr., B.S.. 

ConiMetieat 

Farber, Raphael Peansylvania 

Fields, Abijah Clements Alabama 

Fiaehman, Harold H New Jersey 

Friedman, Bernard New York 

Fucha. Abner M ., New York 

Gale, Louis Harry Pennsylvania 

Gaston. Willaim Bryan.„ _.West Virarinia 

Gjfattens. Wilbur Elton, B.S Maryland 

Click, Samuel. A.B Maryland 

Gurley, Hubert Taylor. North Carolina 

Hall. Cecil Maurice, B.S West Virginia 

Hammond. Kent Cato, B.S West Virginia 

Herbert. Alpha Nathan New Jersey 

Hertz, Ben _ -....New York 

Hofler, Ralph Haynea North Carolina 

Howell. James Gerald, B.S Pennsylvania 

Hulla, Jaroslav _ _ Maryland 

Jacobs, Morris Albert. Maryland 

Keating, John Patrick — — Connecticut 

Kimbrough, Joseph William, Jr.. 

North Carolina 
Knotts, William Kenneth — Maryland 



Laus. Edward Raymond. New York 

Leibensperger, George Franklin, 

Pennsylvania 

Lennon, William Earle. North Carolina 

Linde, Samuel Arthur. Maryland 

London, Daniel New York 

Lowe, Claude Milton Pennsylvania 

McAnally, Alfred Loomia North Carolina 

Miller. Edgar Raymond. A.B... Pennsylvania 

Minnefor, Charles A „...New Jersey 

Montani, Anthony Carmen, B.S Ohio 

Nataro, Joseph — New Jersey 

Navarro, Vicente Aguirre, A.B., 

Philippine Islancis 
Nelson. James Wharton, A3., — Maryland 

Nock. Randolph Maxwell Maryland 

Oshrin, Henry _»^New Jersey 

Pinsky, Myer Mordecai . — New Jersey 

Plassnig, Edwin. B.S Maryland 

Polizotti, Joseph Louis. — .New Jersey 

Pulaski. Leo Edward .....Pennsylvania 

Rathsprecher, laadore New Jersey 

Reynolds, Knight, B.S West Virginia 

Richmond, Lewis Cass, Jr.. A.B...Kentueky 
Roberts. Bryan Nazer. A.B...North Carolina 

Samoff. Jack _ New York 

Silverrteizu Jaoob Maoriea New Jersey 

Simon. Joseph Ralph. Pennsylvania 

Simpson, Henry Hardy. A-B...North Carolina 

Sinton. William Allen Virginia 

Spelsburg. Walter William. B.S. 

West Virginia 

Sulman. William Richard. Pennsylvania 

Tomaiuoli, Michael Francia New Jersey 

Turner, Thomas Bourne, B.S Maryland 

Vila-Morales, Jaime _ Porto Rico 

Visconti, JosephAlbert _...New Jersey 

Ward. William Titus, A.B North Carolina 

Wassersweig, Martin Max. Pennsylvania 

Widmeyer. Robert Samuel, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Wiener. Joseph. „ - New York 

Wilson. Paul Russell. B.S West Virginia 

Winstead. John Lindsay North Carolina 

Zimmerman. Charles C Maryland 



PRIZEMEN 

University Prize — Gold Medal — Edgar R. Miller, A.B. 
Certificates of Honor 
Thomas B. Tltjner, B.S. 
Alpha N. Herbert 
Is.-vDOR Rathsprecher 

In the third year the Dr. Jose L. Hirsh Memorial Prize of $50.00 was 
awarded to Elizabeth B. Sherman for the best work in Pathology during 
the second and third years. 



Harold H. Fischman 
Bex. Hertz 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 79 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF MEDICEVE 

President 
W. S. Love, M.D. 

First Vice-President 

H. A. Cantwell, M.D. 
Second Vice-President 
Noble P. Barnes, M.D. 

Third Vice-President 

A. H. Hawkins, M.D. 

Secretary 

C. W. Maxson, M.D. 

Assistant Secretary 
Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Treasurer 
Herbert Blake, M.D. 

Hospital Committee 

Charles Bagley, Jr. 
G. M. Linthicum, M.D. 

Alumni Council 
Charles Bagley, Jr., M.D. 

Necrologist 
W. J. Todd, M.D. 

Executive Committee 

Robert Mitchell, M.D. 
Frank Jennings, M.D. R. P. Bay, M.D. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D. H. A. Hill, M.D. 

Advisory Committee 

F. Keating, M.D. 
S. G. Davis, M.D. J. W. Ebert, M.D. 

A. E. Goldstein, M.D. R. D. West, M.D. 



80 ENDOWMENT FUND 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund : 
Harry Adler, M.D. John B. Thomas, Ph.G. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 
Stuart Janney Robertson Griswold 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the 
State, its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University of Maryland," and is independent and 
self-perpetuating. Its powers are limited to the expenditure 
of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied 
in the discretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. 
Ck)ntributions, donations and bequests are solicited from 
Alumni and friends. They may be made to the general or 
University Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other depart- 
ment of the University. If intended for the School of Medi- 
cine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some 
special object, as building, research, library, pathology, hos- 
pital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, 
prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly 
regarded. Attention is invited to the ''Charles Frick Research 
Fund," already established in memory of that distinguished 
investigator. Checks should be made payable to J. M. H. Row- 
land, Treas., Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Mary- 
land, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, 

for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic _ - _ _._ 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws 

of the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic - 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 81 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 
OF NURSING. 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 
Annie Crighton, R. N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Stella R. Ricketts, R. N. 

Instructor in Nursing 
Mildred W. Everett, R. N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Louise L. Savage, R. N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Grace Elgin, R. N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and Supervisor of 

Operation Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R. N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 
Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 
Grace Pearson, R. N. 

Helen Dunn, R.N „ „ _ _ - _... Supervisor 

Lillian K. McDaniel, R.N. Supervisor, Nurses Home 

Jane Moffatt, R.N Supervisor, Dispensary 

Lena Stouffer, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetrical Ward 

Leona McMahon, R.N _ ...Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N _ _..Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Marie Davis, R.N „ _ _ Head Nurse, Women's Ward 

Helen Morgart, R.N Head Nurse, Men's Medical Ward 

Mary Shaffer, R.N - Head Nurse, Men's Surgical Ward 

Margaret McCormack, R.N ...Head Nurse, Men's Surgical Ward 

Ida Nagel, RiN „ ...Assistant in Operating Room 



82 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

Anatomy 
C. L. Davis, M.D. 

Physiology 
A. H. Ryan, M.D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Chemistry 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 

Materia Medica 
C. C. Habliston, M.D. 

Medicine 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. J. S. Hogan, M.D. 

L. A. M. KsAUSE, M.D. V. L. Ellicott, M.D. 

Pediatrics 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Psychiatry 
R. McClury Chapman, M.D. 

Neurology 
G. M. Settle, M.D. 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 
Haery M. Robinson, M.D. 

Ophthalmology 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Otology 
J. W. Dov/ney, M.D. 

Surgery 
Joseph L. Holland, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology 
E. A. LOOPER, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 83 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Social Service 
Special Lecturers 

STUDENTS ENROLLED 1924-1925 

Seniors . _ . - _ _ 16 

Intermediates _ .21 

Juniors and Preparatory _ _____ 28 

Total _ „ 65 

GENERAL STATEMENT. 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was estab- 
lished in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the Univer- 
sity Hospital, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being 
morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing 
about 250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thor- 
ough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing 
including experience in the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in 
its opportunity for varied experience and in its thorough cur- 
riculum taught by best qualified instructors and members of 
the Medical Staff of the University. 

Admission — Requirements : In order to become a candidate 
for admission to the Training School, application must be made 
in person or by letter, to the Superintendent of Nurses. An 
application by letter should be accompanied by a statement 
from a clergyman testifying to good moral character and from 
a physician certifying to sound health and unimpaired facul- 
ties. No person will be considered who is not in a good phy- 
sical condition between the ages of 18 and 35. She must also 
show that she has a High School education or its equivalent. 
This is the minimum requirement, as women of superior edu- 
cation and culture are given preference provided they meet the 
requirements in other particulars. 



84 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of 
dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of proba- 
tion, is left to the decision of the Superintendent of Nurses. 
Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neg- 
lect of duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the Super- 
intendent of Nurses, with the approval of the President of the 
University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February, June and Sep- 
tember. 

Hours on Duty : During the probation term the students 
are on duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, 
Intermediate and Senior years, the students are on eight hour 
day duty, with six hours on Sunday and Holidays, and ten 
hour night duty. The night duty periods are approximately 
two months each, with one day at the termination of each 
term for rest and recreation. The period of night duty is ap- 
proximately five or six months during the three years. 

Sickness : A physician is in attendance each day, and when 
ill all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost 
through illness in excess of two weeks, during the three years 
must be made up. Should the authorities of the school decide 
that through the time lost the theoretical work as not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in that 
year, it will be necessary for her to continue her work with 
the next class. 

Vacations : Vacations are given between June and Septem- 
ber. A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the 
completion of the first year and four vv^eeks at the completion 
of the second year. 

Expense : A student receives her board, lodging and a rea- 
sonable amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During 
her period of probation she provides her own uniforms made 
in accordance with the hospital regulations. After being ac- 
cepted as a student nurse she wears the uniform furnished 
by the hospital. The student is also provided with textbooks 
and in addition to this is paid five dollars ($5.00) a month. 
Her personal expenses during the course of instruction and 
training will depend entirely upon her individual habits and 
tastes. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 85 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

The Junior Year is divided into two periods. The first term 
is the preparatory period (4 months) and the second the junior 
term. 

In the preparatory term the student is given practical in- 
struction in: 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies- The cost 
of hospital materials, apparatus and surgical instru- 
ments. 
II. Household economics and the preparation of foods. 

III. The hospital out-patients department and dispensary. 

During this term the practical work is done under constant 
supervision, and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen 
rooms, laundry and store room. 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruc- 
tions divided into laboratory and lecture periods is thirty hours 
and includes courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Dietetics, 
Materia Medica, Personal Hygiene, Drugs and Solutions, 
Household Economxics, Short course in Ethics and History of 
Nursing. 

At the close of the first half of Junior Year the students are 
required to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral tests, 
and failure to do so will be sufficient reason to terminate the 
course at this point. 

SUBSEQUENT COURSE. 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary 
period, occupies two and three-fourths years, and students are 
not accepted for a shorter period. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly en- 
gaged in practical work under the immediate supervision and 
direction of the head nurses and instructors. 



S6 SCHOOLS OF NUESING 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruc- 
tion in Massage, Bacteriology, General Surgery and Introduc- 
tory Medicine. Practical instruction is received in the male 
and female, medical, surgical and childrens' wards. 

INTERMEDIATE YEAR. 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes Pedi- 
atrics, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics, Gyne- 
cology and Orthopaedics. The practical work provides experi- 
ence in the nursing of obstetrical and gjmecological patients, in 
the operating rooms and the out-patient department. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During this period the student receives short courses of lec- 
tures on subjects of special interest. This includes a consider- 
ation of the work of institutions of public and private chari- 
ties, of settlem.ents, and various branches of professional v/crk 
in nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administration work to 
those showing exceptional ability in the Senior Year. Vv^ith 
these students conferences are held on administration and 
teaching problems. 

Examinations : At the end of the first half year, students 
are examined in Anatomy, Physiology, Materia Medica, Die- 
tetics and Hygiene. At the end of the first year in Surgery and 
Bacteriology. 

During the second year they are examined in Urinalysis, 
Massage, Gynecology-, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, 
Obstetrics and Pediatrics. At the end of the third year the 
final examination in Nervous and Mental Diseases, Diseases of 
Special Senses, Venereal Diseases, Ethics and History of 
Nursing. 

Examinations — which are both ^n^itten and oral — include 
practical tests, and the standing of the student is based upon 
the general character of work throughout the year, as well as 
the results of the examinations. Students must pass all sub- 
jects before entering upon the work of the following year. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 87 

Graduation : The diploma of the School will be awarded to 
those who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three 
years and have passed successfully the final examinations. 

Scholarships : One scholarship has been established by the 
Alumnae of the Training School. It entitles a nurse to six 
weeks course at Teachers College, New York. This scholar- 
ship is awarded at the close of the third year to the student 
whose work has been of the highest excellence, and v/ho de- 
sires to pursue post-graduate study and special work. 

An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary 
Board to the student who at the com.pletion of three years 
shows exceptional executive ability. 

GRADUATES, 1925. 

Barr, Alberta _ Maryland Kirtner, Mattie. - Virginia 

Croll, Mildred _ _ Maryland Nock. Myrtle — - - Maryland 

Cannon, Elizabeth „ _ Delaware Scott, Mary ~ Maryland 

Coulter, Zelda North Carolina Shatzer, Myrtle Maryland 

Forrest, A. Louise. _ Pennsj'lvania V/all. Laura- North Carolina 

Frick. Esther _ _ Pennsylvania V.Tiitley, Esteile North Carolina 

Fletcher, Grace _ _..JNorth Carolina Walter, Charlotte Maryland 

Hathcock, Mary. — _ .North Carolina 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM. 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training the 
University offers a combined Academic and Nursing progi^am 
leading to the degi-ee of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in 
Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospit^l period), 
consisting of 70 sem.ester hours, are spent in the College of 
Arts and Sciences of the Universitj^ during which period the 
student has an introduction to the general cultural subjects 
which are considered fundamental in any college training. At 
least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park in order that the student may have her share 
in the social and cultural activities of college life. The last 
three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore. 
In the fifth year of the combined program certain elective 
courses such as Public Health Nursing, Nursing Education, 
Practical Sociolog>^ and Educational Psychology' are arranged. 



88 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAM IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

Freshmen Year. 

Semester I Semester II 

English Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 3 3 

Foreign Language _ _ 4-3 4-3 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101) 4 4 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. Sci. 101) 3 3 

Elementary Foods (H. E. 101) _ _.. 3 3 

Physical Education _ _ 1 1 

18 18 

Sophomore Year. 

English Literature or History _ 3 3 

Organic and Food Chemistry _ _ _ 3 

Nutrition _ _ _ 3 

General Economics (Econ. 105) 3 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. 101) 3 

Gen. Zoology (Zool. 101) 4 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-102) 1 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 102) 2 2 

Electives _ 1 5 

17 17 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING. 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was organized and 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 1899 
and has operated successfully for a quarter of a century. 

The course of study is three years, during which time the 
Superintendent of the School assigns each pupil for definite 
periods to the various v/ards and services. Such practical 
training under skilled supervisors best applies the science and 
most adequately teaches the art of nursing. The course of 
study is modified and revised year by year, always with the 
idea of improvement- In schools of nursing, as in all other 
professional schools, changes are necessary, for to stand still 
is to retrograde. Each year new subjects are introduced or 
old ones are taught in new and more attractive ways. The 
curriculum embraces a preliminary period of four months, a 
junior term of eight months, an intermediate term of twelve 
months and a senior term of twelve months. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 89 

Mercy Hospital being attached to the Medical School of the 
University of Maryland, its nurses enjoy the exceptional ad- 
vantage of systematic courses of lectures covering every de- 
partment of nursing. These lectures, given by professors who 
are masters of their subjects, are made to co-ordinate with 
the school curriculum, thus giving the student nurse a thor- 
ough knowledge of her profession. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applications for admission to the School of Nursing should 
be addressed to Superintendent of Nurses, Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Requirements : Highest moral standard, intelligence, health, 
high-school education. Social references and letters from pas- 
tors and physicians are also required. 

The course comprises three years of theory and practice. 
After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School proper, 
receiving Ten Dollars per month; their education being con- 
sidered their compensation. Board, laundry, etc., furnished 
by the institution. 

Four weeks before admission, candidates should forward 
$35.00 and measurements for uniforms and aprons, which will 
be in readiness on their arrival. No orders will be considered 
until this amount is received. These uniforms are worn 
throughout entire course, thus obviating additional expense 
after the probationary term expires. All clothing should be 
distinctly marked with names, Style No. 28, which may be 
procured from Woven Name Tape Co., Winstead, Conn. On 
admission, $10.00 is deposited on account of books. 

Hours of duty: 7 A. M. to 7 P. M., with three hours off 
and one hour for meals, making an eight-hour system, one 
afternoon every week, and two weeks' vacation annually. 

If nurses desire to remain out after 9 :30 P. M. permission 
must be secured from the Superintendent. Late permission 
until 11 :30 P. M. may be obtained once every two weeks, from 
June to September, and once a month from September to June. 
No visitors allowed except when off duty. 



90 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any cause that 
may be deemed sufficient by the Superintendent of Nurses. 

Dentistry should be attended to prior to entrance. Candi- 
dates should come provided with watch with second hand, 
fountain pen, scissors and comfortable shoes with rubber heels 
not too high; plain underwear, soap, towels, three laundry 
bags, shoe case and napkin ring. 

Address baggage to Nurses' Home, Mercy Hospital, Pleasant 
and Calvert Streets, Baltimore, Md- 

GRADUATES OF 1925. 

Boch, Mary Elizabeth. _ Maryland Hollingsworth, Mary HazeL— Virginia 

Boyle, Mary Agnes Pennsylvania Kenly, Margaret Mair Pennsylvania 

Busick, Gertrude Metzger. — -...Maryland Kern, Rosalie Caroline. — Ohio 

Carney, Gertrude _...Mai*yland Lingg, Mabel Mary — Pennsylvania 

Clark, Mabel Marie... „ » Maryland Loraditch, Mary Agnes Pennsylvania 

Foley, Rosemary C-ecilia. West Virginia Rider, Jessie Elizabeth Maryland 

Gambino, Mae Adeline -...West Virginia Rider, Veronica Ellen Pennsylvania 

Garvey, Mary Cecilia. _ Maryland Reynolds, Monica Cecilia -...Maryland 

Kardin, Mildred Ruth...™ _ Maryland Speilenberg, Dolores J Pennsylvania 



VOL. XI 



JULY, 1926 



No. 1 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




PART TWO 

CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 

SESSION 1926-1927 



PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR 
JANUARY, APRIL, JULY AND OCTOBER 
LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Post Office at 

^Dr,^4■i■,^^•..^ TV,T««,»1„^J J i-X.^ A -J. ^£ A J. o^ tf\tc% 



INDEX 



Alumni Association 

Anniial Hospital Appointments. 

Board of Instrviction. 

Board of Regents. 

Calendar 

Combined Coui-se in Arts and Medicine 

Consolidation of Schools 

Curriculum, Organization of 

Anatomy 

Histology 

Embryology 

Physiology 

Bacteriology and Immunology 

Biological Chemistry 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica.... 

Pathology 

Medicine ..._ « 

Clinical Pathology 

Gastro-Enterology 

Psychiatry 

Pediatrics 

Neurology _ _ 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 

Medical Jurisprudence 

Surgery 

Anaesthesia — 

Dermatology - 

Ortliopaedic Surgery 

Roentgenology and Radiotherapy 

Throat and Nose 

Genito-Urinary 

Colon and Rectum 

Obstetrics 

G>-necology 

Ophthalmology and Otology 

History of Medicine - 

Disi)ensary Reports: 

Mercy Hospital — 

University Hospital _ 



Ciinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital _ 23 

University Hospital 15 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Mercy Hospital 28 

University Hospital 20 

Endowment Fund. 8? 

Expenc^es, Students' 75 

Fees _ 70 

Gi-aduates 81 

General Sununary of Students 80 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 32 

Mercy Hospital 23 

Baltimore City Hospital 31 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

for the Insane. 34 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 34 

University Hospital 15 

Libraries 35 

Matricixlatcs 7S 

Medical Council 5 

Prizes _ 7 1 

Prizemen . 81 

Requirements for Matriculation.... 65 

Rules „ 69 

Schedule - 61 

Scholarships - — 71 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospital 31 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 32 

Mercy Hospital. ..„ _ 24 

University Hospital 17 

Training Schools for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital - 91 

University Hospital _ 84 

University Council. - — 4 

University of Maryland, Organization of $ 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore Medical College News, and the Jour- 
nal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 

VOL, XI JULY, 1926 No. 1 



annual ANNO'UNCEMENT. 
session 1926-27. 



CALENDAR 



1926-1927 

SCHOOL OF MEDICIKE 

1926. 

September 21 to 25, Inc. — Examinations for advanced standing. 

September 27 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

October 4 — Last day for i-egistration. 

November 11 — Holiday (Armistice Day). 

November 24 — Thanksgiving recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

November 29 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

December 23 — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

1927. 

January 3 — Instruction resxmied with the first scheduled period. 

January 17 — Registration begins for the second semester. 

January 31 — Instruction begins (second semester). 

February 5 — Last day for registration (second semester). 

February 22 — Holiday (Washington's Birthday). 

April 14 — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

April 19 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

June 4 — Commencement Day. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of 
r/ine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for tenns of nine years each. The general administra- 
tion of the University is vested in the President. The Uni- 
versity Council is an advisory body, composed of the President, 
the Assistant to the President, the Director of the Agricul- 
tural Expeiiment Station, the Director of the Extension Serv- 
ice, and the Deans. The University Council acts upon all mat- 
ters having relation to the University as a whole, or to co-oper- 
ative work between the constituent groups. Each school has 
its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members 
of its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal af- 
fairs of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Aits and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of PhaiTnacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are 
|located in Baltimore; the others in College Park, Tvlaryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Clmirmcin Term expires 1933 

Robert Grain, Esq * _ - Term expires 1933 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer _....„ _ „..Term expires 1932 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow..'...- — Term expires 1931 

John E. Raine, Esq - _ _ Term expires 1930 

C. G. Gelder, Esq - _ Term expires 1929 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary _...._ _ Term expires 1927 

B. John Black, Esq _ -...._ _ Term expires 1926 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq. „ _ Term expires 1934 



Raymond A, Pearson, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., 

President and ExecvMve Officer 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, A.M., D. Agr., LL. D _ _ President 

H. G. Byrd, B.S Assistant to the President 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S , Dean of the GoUege of Agriculture 

A. N. Johnson, S.B _ „ Dean of the Gollege of Engineering 

Frederick E. Lee, Ph.D _ Dean of the Gollege of Arts and Sciences 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D _ Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Phar.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S JHead of Department of Information 

H. F. Gotterman, M.S _..Dean of the Gollege of Education 

M. Marie Mount, A.B Acting Dean of the Gollege of Home Economics 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D _ Dean of the Graduate School 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Director of the Experiment Station 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr _ Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.G.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDiaNE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 

SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.E., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAl^D, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B., M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

A. H. RYAN, M.D. 



6 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

SOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. _ Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. _ _ _ Rhinolog>- and Laryngology 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Chas. O'Donovan, A.m., M.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D _ - Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D _ _ Clinical Medicine 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D _ _ _ Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D „ Rhinology and Lai-^TigoIogy 

PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., ScD., Professor of Surgery 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., ScD., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor Ophthalmology and Otology. 

William S. G.\rdner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D., Professor of Physiology. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 

and Colon. 
TiLGHMAN B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Era 

bryology. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
R TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Jos E. GiCHNER, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 

Therapeutics. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 7 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Irving J Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 
C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM., (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene 

and Public Health. 
John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 
S. Griffith DA^^s, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 
Roentgenology. , ^t . i 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Psychiatry. 
Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Henry, J. Walton. M.D., Professor of Roentgen olog3\ 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

COMPTON Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Nose 
and Throat. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. Locker, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Sur- 
gery. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Abraham Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

^C. C. CoNSER, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

I Medicine. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 



8 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

0. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Sidney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Nose and Throat, 

W. H. TOULSON, A.B., M.Sc. M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinaiy 

Surgery. 
C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Edward Uhlenhuth, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
H. S. Sullivan, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiati-y. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
C. L. JOSLIN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Theodore Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology. 
John R. Oliver, M.D., Lecturer on History of Medicine. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
Geo. a. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Sam'l W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 
W. I. Messick, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Wm. H. Ingram, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
H. H. Warner, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

F. A. RiES, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Howard E. Ashbury, M. D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Harris Goldman, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

MiLFORD Levy, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 

Reed Rockwood, A.B., M.S., M.D,, Associate in Medicine. 

M. J. Hanna, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

A. H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

A. E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

H. M. Foster, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Wm. J. Todd, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

John F. Traband, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wm. F. Geyer, M.D., Insti-uctor in Pediatrics. 

R. F.McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. G .Murray, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

George A. Knipp, M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. F. Hogan, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

William Michel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. M. BUBERT, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Pathology. 

W. L. Brent, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. L. SiNSXY, M.D., Instructor in Opthalmology. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 

C. F. Horine, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

F. S. Badagliacca, M.D., Instmctor in Medicine. 

W, S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Edvv\\rd Novak, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. A. NovEY, M.D., Insti-uctor in Obstetrics and Pathology. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

A. A. SusSMAN, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
F. T. Kyper, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
DwiGHT MoHR, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

W. R. Geraghty, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Clym: N. Marvel, M.D., Assistant in Surgei-y. 

EvERARD Briscoe, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Anatomy. 

N. J. Davidov, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. KoPPELMAN, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

George E. Wells, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

I. S. ZiNBERG, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in GenitoUrinary Disea.ses. 

J. H. COLLINSON, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

H. L. Rogers, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

D. T. Pessagno, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. J. McGorrell, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy and Surgery. 

Robt. W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

Joseph N. Zierler, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

W. E. Cole, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. A. RUTLEDGE, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
A. C. Monninger, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 
Isador a. Siegel, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
John A. O'Connor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Lawrence S. Otell, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
James Brown, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
A. B. BucHNESS, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmuller, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. O. Warfield, A.m., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
ISADORE I. Levy, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

C. D. Steenken, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
R. M. Henning, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 11 

A, G. Webster, M.D., Assistant in Pediatiics. 

Ephraim Meyer, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Rachel Korotky, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Elizabeth B. Sherman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Welch England, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

L. J. MiLLAN, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Uinnary Diseases. 

Willlvm Emrich, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

W. H. Woody, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Thomas B. Turner, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. Vv\ Rosenthal, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

and 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both insti- 
tutions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Bal- 
timore Medical College, the entire equipment of three large 
medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one 
of the oldest foundations for medical education in America, 
ranking fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of 
the United States. It was chartered in 1807, under the name 
of the College of Medicine of Maryland, and its first class was 
graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College was empowered by 
the Legislature to annex three other colleges or faculties, of 
Divinity, of Law, and of Arts and Sciences, and the four col- 
leges thus united were ''constituted an University by the name 
and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of 
Medicine of the University of Maryland has always been a 
leading medical college, especially prominent in the South and 
widely known and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure in Amer- 
ica devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries and the first medical college library in 
the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a 
compulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Den- 
tistry was first given (1837), and here were first installed 
independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases of Women 
and Children (1867) and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 



ORGANIZATION IS 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 
hospital, and in this hospital intramural residency for the 
senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore 
Medical College, an institution of 32 years' growth. By this 
association the facilities of the School of Medicine were en- 
larged in faculty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated 
under Legislative enactment in 1872, and established on Han- 
over Street in a building afterwards known as the Matemite, 
the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was 
affected with the Washington University School of Medicine, in 
existence since 1827, and the College was removed to its pres- 
ent location at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this arrange- 
ment medical control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy 
Hospital, was obtained, and on this foundation in 1899 the 
present admirable college building was erected. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 



LABORATORY ANB CLINICAL FACILTnES. 

The Laboratories. 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of 
buildings at Greene and Lombard Sts., and the Building at Cal- 
vert and Saratoga Sts. The schedule is so adjusted that the 
laboratory periods are placed with a view of obviating unnec- 
essary movement on the part of the classes. The building 
known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Sts., 
houses three departments. The Anatomical Laboratory is 
placed upon the top floor, where skylights and an auxiliary 
modem system of electric lighting gives adequate illumination 
of the subjects. On this floor are the office of the department 
and the necessary preparation rooms. The Department of 
Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is a large room 



14 ORGANIZATION 

for the general student laboratory, which is thoroughly 
equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in addi- 
tion contains many instruments of unique and original design. 
With ofRce and stock-room adjoining, this laboratory is com- 
plete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray 
Laboratory is the Department of Physiology. In addition to 
the large student laboratory; which is constructed for sections 
of forty-five students, there are rooms for the departmental 
office, preparation of material, and storage of apparatus. An 
additional room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experi- 
ments. In this building there is maintained an animal 
room where is kept an abundance of material for experi- 
mental purposes. The embalming and storage plant for the 
Department of Anatomy is in physical connection with the 
building and its special department. The laboratories of 
physiology and pharmacology are completely equipped with 
apparatus lockers so that in accord with the best ideas of in- 
struction, the students work in groups of two each, and each 
group has sufficient apparatus so that the experimental v/ork 
can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general stock- 
room. 

The laboratories of Pathology and Biochemistry are located 
OR the third floor of the Dental Building. The former depart- 
ment has a large student laboratory with a capacity of ninety; 
the tables are so placed as to secure the most satisfactory illu- 
mination for microscopic work, in addition, all of the tables 
are electrically equipped for substage illumination. This 
equipment is also provided for all laboratories where micro- 
scopic work obtains. The museum of the Department of Pa- 
thology adjoins the student laboratory. Here are available for 
demonstration about fifteen hundred carefully prepared and 
mounted specimens, and for laboratory instruction and study, 
the material from more than two hundred autopsies with com- 
plete clinical histories. Several preparation, research, and of- 
fice rooms communicate with the other rooms of this depart- 
ment. The laboratory of Biochemistry is constructed and 
equipped for sections of fifty. The laboratory is completely 
equipped for the facilitation of work. The office and stock- 
room adjoin. In the Main Building is the Museum of Anat- 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 15 

omy, where are arranged for student reference, specimens 
which represent the careful selection of material over a period 
of many years. In the University Hospital is the Student 
Laboratory for the analytical studies of those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar laboratory 
is maintained in the building at the N. W. corner of Saratoga 
and Calvert Sts., for the student work on the wards of the 
Mercy Hospital. 

In this latter building are two laboratories for Bacteriology, 
Histology, and Clinical Pathology, and an additional dissecting 
room which is used for the course in Topographical Anatomy. 
The two laboratories accommodate ninety students or the full 
class, and are equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes 
and apparatus. Each of the departments housed in this build- 
ing are provided with their individual offices, preparation, and 
stockrooms. 

Clinical Facilities 

L^'IVEKSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital which is the property of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for, the care of the 
sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 
1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infinnary, and at that 
time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. 

The present hospital has a capacity of 275 beds devoted to 
general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly mod- 
ern X-ray department and clinical laboratory, and a postmor- 
tem building which is constructed with special reference to 
the instruction of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings 
so that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture 
halls and laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary 
I and wards. 

Owing to its situation, being adjacent to the largest manu- 

I facturing district of the city and the shipping district, large 

numbers of accident cases are received. These combined with 



16 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

the cases of many sick seamen and with patients from our own 
city furnish a large amount of clinical material. Accommoda- 
tions for thirty obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital 
for the purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to 
each member of the graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door ob- 
stetrical clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful 
pre-natal supervision, is attended during labor by a senior 
student, supervised by a hospital physician and assisted by a 
graduate nurse, and is visited during the puerperium by the 
attending student and graduate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor 
and puerperal records are kept, making this work of extreme 
value to the medical student, not only from the obstetrical 
standpoint, but in making him appreciate the value of social 
service and public health work. 

During the year ending December 31, 1925, 395 cases were 
delivered in the hospital and 935 cases in the out-door depart- 
ment. Students in the graduating class delivered an average 
of fourteen cases, each student being required to deliver twelve 
cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital 
and the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in 
order that the teaching may be the same in each. Each dis- 
pensary has the following departments: Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, 
Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, Der- 
matology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

Ail students in their senior year work in the special depart- 
ments one hour each day. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 17 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL. 

Raymond A. Pearson, A.M., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean. 

M. C. PiNCOFFS, S.B., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Dejxirtment of Surgery, 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, President of the Board of Regents. 

A. J. LoMAS, M.D., Superintendent of the HospitaL 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, 

J. Allison Muir, 

G. M. Shrivbr, 

W. B. Brooks, 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Sta^ff. 
Page Edmunds, M.D. Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Representing Medical Aluwmi. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D. G. Milton Linthicum, M,D, 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Superintendent of tlve Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

Physicians. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D„ 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. G, Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Paul W. Clough, M.D. Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 
Juuus Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist. 
R. M. Chapman, M. D. 

Pediatrician. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 



18 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Pathologists. 

Hugh R. Spencek, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Paul R. Rockwood, M.D. 

Surgeons. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Lanjngologist. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons. 
R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Genito-U'rinary Surgeon. 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. 

Roentgenologists. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Hov/ard E. Ashbury, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Henry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Anaesthetists. 

S. Griffith Dams, M.D. Samu-el W. Moore, DD.S. 

W. G. Queen, M.D. 

Obstetricians. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Dudley Pleasants Bowe, A.B., M.D. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

M. a. No\^y, A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

William T.4run, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

J. AV, Downey, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Gynecologists. 



19 



J. Mason Hundley, M.D, 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 
R. G. WiLLSE, M.D. 



reside:nt staff. 

Resident Physician, 
Edgar R, Miller, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician. 
Dr. Francis A. Ellis. 

Assista.nt Resident on Pediatrics. 
Elizabeth B. Sherman, A.B., M.D. 

Resident Snrgemi. 
Dr. R. S. Anderson. 

Assistant Resident Surgeon. 
W. E. Lennon, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Eva F. Dodge, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Obstetrician. 
Margaret B. Ball.aj'.d, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist. 
Knight Reynolds, M.J). 



Inteimes. 



Jack H. Bbachley, M.D. 
Charles W. Edmonds, M.D. 
Julian C. Elliott, M.D. 
Welch England, M.D. 
Herbert J. Gorham, M.D. 
Nevins B. Hendrix, M.D. 
i Jacob R. Jensen, P.I.D. 



Frank F. Lusby, M.D, 
William C. Polsue, M.D. 
Ersie V. Teagarden, M.D. 
Herbert R. Tobias, M.D. 
John L. Winstead, M.D. 
L. F. Woolley, M.D. 
John D. Rudisill, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 
Medicine. 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
H. M. BUBBRT, M.D. William Michel, M.D. 

B. P. Warren, M.D. A. L. Fehsenpeld, M.D. 

RoscoE Metzel, M.D. Wm. H. Triplett, M.D. 

M. P. Byerly, M.D. Joseph Rosenblatt, M.D. 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestiv£. 

J. H. Ullrich, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D. M. S. Koppleman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. N. J. Davidov, M.D. 

W. Armstrong, M.D. 

Neuroloff]/. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. B. Pushkin, M.D. 

Psychiatry. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Chief of Clinic, 

Nicholas W. Pinto, M.D. Morris L. Schenidlinger, M.D. 

Harry W. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Diseases of the Lungs. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Diseases of Metabolism. 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Cardiovascular Diseases. 
William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Pediatrics. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
C. LoRiNG JosLiN, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
W. H. Ingram, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
H. H. Warner, M.D. C. E. Mackb, M.D. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D. G. A. Knipp, M.D. 

W. J. Todd, M.D. J. J. McGarrell, M.D. 

G. E. Wells, M.D. H. A. Rutledge, M.D. 

F. S. Orem, M.D. R. M. Hening, M.D. 

W. L. Brent, M.D. Marie Kovner, M.D. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. A. G. Webster, M.D. 

J. H. Traband, M.D. Ephraim Meyer, M.D. 

W. G. Geyer, M.D. Rachel Korotky, M.D. 

Elizabeth B. Sherman, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 21 

Surgery, 

Charlfs Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
H. M. Foster, M.D. E. S. Johnson, M.D. 

C. A. Reipschneider, M.D, W. R. Johnson, M.D. 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. James Brown, M.D. 

F. A. SiEGRiST, M.D. T. N. Wilson, M.D. 
R. H. Wiggins, M.D. ' J. A, O'Connor, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Profesi^or of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Genito- Urinary. 

W. H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Harris Goldman, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

J. H. Collinson, M.D. H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D. L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

X-Ray. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Roentgenologist. 

Dermatology. 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
J. E. Gately, M.D. 

Nose and Throat. 

E. A. Looper, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Frank B. Anderson, Chief of Clinic. 

F. A. Holden, M.D. Charles Cahn, M.D. 

Gynecology. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. George L. Wissig, M.D. 

William J. Fulton, M.D. 

Obstetrics. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Dudley Pleasants Bowe, B.A., M.D. M. Alexander No\'ey, M.D. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, M.D. 

Maxwell Mazer, M.D. 



22 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

Eye and Ear. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of OphtJialmology and Otology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

H. L. SiNSKY, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Charles Cahn, M.D. John G. Runkel, M.D. 

Social Service. 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress. 



UXIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT. 

October 1, 1924, to September 30, 1925. 



Pediatrics 

Surg-ery 

Dermatology 

Obstetrics 

Eye and Ear _ 

Medicine 

Genito-Urinary 

Orthopedic . _ 

Gynecology 

Nose and Throat 

Neurolog-y 

Gastro-Intestinal 

Tuberculosis 

Cystoscopy 

Psychiatry 

Proctology 



Cases 



New 


Old 


Total 


2,484 


19,978 


22,462 


2,059 


7,300 


9,419 


3,414 


4,415 


7,829 


1,491 


4,608 


6,099 


1,592 


3,062 


4,65-4 


987 


3,153 


4,140 


536 


2,901 


3,437 


315 


2,893 


3,208 


1,023 


1,895 


2,918 


891 


871 


1,762 


351 


1,272 


1,623 


293 


731 


1,024 


200 


212 


412 


• 63 


300 


366 


im 


167 


273 


52 


59 


111 



■ Total _ 15,860 



53,877 



69,737 



In addition to the above there were treated in the State Venereal 
Clinic 20,133 patients. 



MERCY HOSPITAL 23 

MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of ]\Iercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at 
the comer of Calveit and Saratoga Streets then owned by the 
Washington University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the 
Hospital came under the control of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work of admin- 
istering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hos- 
pital, as it was then called, was much too small to accommo- 
date the rapidly gi'owing demands upon it. However, it was 
not until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, wdth the assistance of 
the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, were 
able to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This 
building was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then 
the growing demands for more space has compelled the erec- 
tion of additions, until now there are accommodations for 351 
patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City 
Hospital to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 800,000 
inhabitants. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the ex- 
clusive control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

It adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients from 
the public wards are operated upon in the College operating 
rooms. This union of the Hospital and College buildings great- 
ly facilitates the clinical teaching, as there is no time lost in 
passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and 
Electric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients 
from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the 
(Pennsylvania Railroad Company and its branches. 



24 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS. 

Samuel S. Shoemaiver, Esq., Chairman 

Sister M. Carmelita Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL,D. 

Sister M. Imelda Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Sister M. Hilda W. D. Wise, M.T>. 

Sister M. Beatrice H. G. Beck, M.D. 

Sister M. Florence F. D. Sanger, M.D. 

Sister M. Louise T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

MEKCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

SUPvGICAL DIVISION. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Elliot H. Hutchins, M.D. A. M. Evans, M.D, 

K. H. Locher, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

Thomas R. Chambers, M.D. F. X. Kearney, M.D. 

AssistoMt Surgeons. 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.D. Chas. Maxson, M.D. 

N. C. Marvel, M.D. H. B. McElwain, M.D. 

Everard Briscoe, M.D. D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 
DwiGHT MoiiR, M.D. 

Ophthahiiologist and Otologist. 
Harry Friedenv/ald, M.D. 

Associates. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D. J. W. DoWxNey, MJD. 

Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists. 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologists and Laryngologists. 
W. F. Zinn, M. D. Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

Proctologist. 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Associate. 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 25 

Orthopaedic Surgeon. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate. 

H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologists. 

A. G. Rytina, M.D. A. J. Gillis, M.D. 

MEDICAL DIVISION. 

Physicians. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. Gary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 

Associates. 

PIubert C. Knapp, M.D. E. E. Mayer, M.D. 

C. C. W. JuDD, M.D. Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 

Leon Freedom, M.D. George McLean, M.D. 

F. T. Kyper, M.D. A. A. Sussman, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. 

Gastro-Entero legist. 
Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 
Associates. 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Pediatricians. 

John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Assistant. 

F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist. 

Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Assistant. 

Milford Levy, M.D. 



26 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Dermatologist. 
Melvin Eosenthal, M.D. 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

Obstetricians. 

Ch-\rles Bp.acx, M.D. Geo. W. Dobbin, M.D. 

A^<sodafe Obstetricians. 

E. P. Smith, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION. 
Gynecologists. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. Abraham Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists. 
T. K. Galvin, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Pathologists. 
Standish McCleiary, M. D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D. 

John G. Huck, M.D. Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians — Sister M. Joan, Ph.G., R.N., Anna Chenoweth, R.N. 

Frances Donovan, R.N. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 
Radiogt-uphers. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. W. Golley, M.D. 

Technician — Sister M. de Sales, R.N. 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 27 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDEINT STAFF. 

Resident Physician. 
Thomas B. Turnehi, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician. 
J. E. Eastland, M.D. 

Resident Surgeon. 
P. G. Matta, M.D. 

Ass-lstant Resident Surgeons. 

Edward Flassxig, M.D. I. Maseritz, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. Harry Glickman, M.D. 

S. S. Armstrong, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist. 
Cecil M. Hall, M.D. 

Internes. 

F. R. Di Paula, M. D. W. C. Merkel, M.D. 

j Samuel Hautman, M.D. I. L. Levin, M.D. 

' E. V. Jordan, M.D. A. Rattenni. 

E. J. Leonard, M.D. B. A. Weber, M.D. 



28 DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Surgery Supervisors. 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons. 

D. H. MoHR, M.D. EvERARD Briscoe, M.D. 

I. O. RiDGBLY, M. D. H. B. McElwain, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Genito-V rinary Surgery. 

A. J. Giujs, M.D. K. B. Legge, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Albebtus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. W. GOLLEY, M.D. 

Medicine Supervisors. 
W. F. Lockwood, M.D. M. C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 

B. T. Baggott, M.D. F. T. Kyper, M.D. 

F. N. HiLLis, M.D. Albert Scagnetti, M.D. 

A. A. SussMAN, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases. 
A. A. SusSMAN, M. D., Chief of Clinic. 

Diseases of the Lungs. 
B. T. Baggott, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 



MEUCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



29 



Diseases of Stomach, 

Supervisor, Juuus Friedenwald, M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 

T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. S. Zinberg, M.D. 

M. Feldman, M.D . A. Eisenberg, M.D. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. J. N. Zierler, M.D. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D. I. I. Levy, M.D, 

C. D. Steenken, M.D. 

W. F. Zinn, M.D., Esophagoscopist. 

Nervous Diseases. 

Supervisor, A. C. Gillis. 

Attending Physicians. 



MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 



W. S. G/VRDNER, M.D. 



E. P. Smith, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 



Diseases of Women. 
Supervisors. 

Attending Surgeons. 



R. A. Warner, M.D. 



A. Samuels, M.D. 



T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

C. F. J. COUGHLIN, M.D. 



W. F. Zinn, M.D. 



H. F. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



E. Edlavitch, M.D. 
Diseases of Nose and Throat. 

F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 
Diseases of Eye and Ear. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 



M. Raskin, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Proctology. 
L. J, Rosenthal, M.D. 

Der^iatology. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

Assistant. 
William G. Coppage, M.D. 

Social Service Department. 
Sister M. Helen, R.N. Catherine Campbell, R.N. 



New 


Old 


Total 


1,024 


3,091 


4,115 


1,189 


1,811 


3,ooa 


304 


821 


1,125 


423 


807 


1,230 


675 


596 


1,271 


56 


174 


230 


127 


443 


570 


16 


17 


33 


16 


28 


44 


191 


1,088 


1,279 


168 


462 


630 


772 


5,114 


5,886 



30 MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT. 

January 1, 1925, to December 31, 1925. 

Sister M. Helen, Directress 

Cases 
Dispensary Clinics 

Surgical _ „ 

Medical _ _ . 

Gynecological 
Eye and Ear 
Nose and Throat 
Neurological 
Gastro-Intestinal 

Dental 

Proctological. 

Orthopedic . _ __ _ 

Dermatological 
. Genito-Urinai-y 

4,983 14,478 19,461 

OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely- 
increased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors 
of City Charities to allov^' the immense material of these hos- 
pitals to be used for the purpose of medical education. There 
are daily visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff 
of the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness in study, and the use made 
of it in medical teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospital consists of the following sep- 
arate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 88 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 
The Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 



STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL 31 

STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL. 

VISITING STAFF. 

Tpiomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Tuberculosis HospitaL 

Harry Goldsmith, M.I)., Physician-in-Charge of the Detention Hospital 

for the Insane. 
Wiley D. Forbus, A.B., M.D., Visiti7ig Pathologist. 
t Lawrence S. Otell, M.D., Resident Pathologist, 

CONSULTING STAFF. 

Otologist. 
William Tap.un, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologiiit. 
W. H. TouLSON, M.D. 

Lary ngo logis t s. 

H. R. Slack, M.D. 

Edvv^ard a. Looper, M.D. 

Pedia4,rician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 

PsychiatHsts. 

Henry J. Berkley, M.D. 
Adolph Meyer, M.D. 

Orthopedist. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Proctologist. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Visitijig Physician. 

Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons, 

Frj^nk S. Lynn, M.D. 
C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 



32 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR 

CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active 
treatment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park," a 
colonial estate of seventy-five acres at Hillsdale, within the 
western city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds 
and every modern facility for the treatment of orthopaedic 
cases as well as a most beautiful park-like environment and 
farm, and is closely affiliated with the University of Maryland 
for bed-side instruction. 

STAFF. 
E. TUNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B.. M.D. Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

COMPT'ON RiELY, M.D. 

Dispensary S'tirgeons. 
H. L. KoGERS, M.D. Moses Gellman, M.D. 

Fhysio-Therapists and Instructors in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman Miss Elizabeth Emory 

Miss Florence Grape Miss Georgiana Wisong 

Miss Maky H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Miss Mary Sampson, Assistant. 

Roentgenologists. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D. Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Attending Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Pediatrist. 
Benjamin Tappan, B.A., M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
A. M. Shipley, Sc.D,, M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 33 

Attending N euro-Surgeon, 
Charles Bagley, Jr., M.D. 

Attending Laryngologist, 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Attending DerwMtologist. 
John R. Asercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Patiwlogist, 
Howard J. Maldbis, M.D. 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

A t tending Neuro logiM. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Dentists. 
G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.3. ' J. B. Bbll, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 
J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D. Randolph Winslov/, A,M., M.D., LL.D. 

Consultin g Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llswellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas F. Futcher, A.B., M.D. W^illiam S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
HiRx\M Woods, M.D., LL.D. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse. 
Miss Mabel Brown, R.N. 

Head Nurse. 
\ Miss Grace L. Elgin, R.N. 

Resident Interne. 
Gordon Bennett Taylob 



34 SHEPPARD AND ENOCH PRATT HOSPITAL 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Mary- 
land by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this 
school to present to its students liberal opportunities for the 
study of diseases of infants and children. 

STAFF. 

Obstetrician. 

Dr. L. H. Douglass 

Pediatricians. 

Dr. W. C. Bacon Dr. W. H. Ingram 

Dr. C. R. Goldsborough Dr. C. L. Joslin 

Surgeon, 

Dr. N. Winslow 

Dermatologist. 

Dr. J. A. BucHNESS 

Octdist. 

Dr. C .A. Clapp 

Orthopedic Surgeon, 
Dr. W. H. Daniels 

Physician. 
Dr. C. p. Clautice 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE 
AND FEEBLE-MINT>ED. 

The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital. This insti- 
tution is one of the most modem hospitals for the treatment 
and care of the insane in this country. It is well endowed 
and its superintendent is R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor 
of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland. In this hos- 
pital intensive treatment and study of mental diseases is car- 
ried on a large number of the patients entering voluntary. The 
students under the direction of Dr. Chapman and his assistants 
in a series of clinics are shown the early manifestations and 
the various stages of mental diseases, the methods of treat- 
ment, and their effect. Special attention is given to etiological 
factors and the discussion of prevention. 

Spring Grove Hospital. Through the courtesy of the Su- 
perintendent of this institution, the Professor of Psychiatry is 
enabled to present to the Vveekly clinics to the fourth year 
class the different typ^s, of psychoses and psj^cho-neuroses. 



LIBRARIES 35 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase 
of the collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 23,928 
volumes, a file of 70 current (medical) journals, and several 
thousand pamphlets and reprints. It is well stocked with re- 
cent literature, including books and periodicals of general in- 
terest. The home of the Library is Davidge Hall, a comfort- 
able and commodious building in close proximitj^ to the class 
rooms and the Laboratories of the Medical Department. The 
Library is open daily during the year, except in August, for 
use of members of the Faculty, the students, and the profes- 
sion generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of 
Maryland, containing 50,000 volumes, is open to the students 
of the school. The leading medical publications of the world 
are received by the library and complete sets of many journals 
are available. Other Libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody 
(215,307 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library (483,- 
327 volumes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school 
without charge. 



36 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revi- 
sion of teaching in this school in order to meet modern re- 
quirements. The multiplication of specialties in medicine and 
surgery necessitates a veiy crowded course and the introduc- 
tion of electives will very soon be depended on to solve some 
of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments: 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, 
but in no case are the students of different years thrown to- 
gether in the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study 
of the structures and functions of the normal body. Labora- 
tory work occupies most of the student's time during these 
two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is 
given in the second year. The third and fourth years are al- 
most entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt 
to bring together teacher and student in close personal rela- 
tionship. In many courses of instruction the classes are di- 
vided into small groups and a large number of instructors in- 
sures attention to the needs of each student. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CUKFJCULUM 37 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of 
proficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is 
determined largely by partial examinations, recitations and 
assigned work carried on throughout the course. 

BEPARTBIENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 
AIND EMBRYOLOGY. 

C. L. Dams. M.D _ - Professor of Anatomy 

TiLGHMAN B. Harden, A.B., M.D Prof, of Histology and Embryology 

Edward Uklenhuth Associate Professor of Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D. Instructor in Histology 

EvERARD W, Briscoe. M.D _ Assistant in Anatomy 

Wm. E. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

RoBT. W. Johnson, MD Assistant in Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D .............Assistant in Anatomy 

First Year. Didactic. Five hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. Each day, preceding the laboratory period, a quiz 
and demonstration of from forty to fifty minutes is held, cov- 
ering the laboratory work for the day. 

LahoToiovy, Eighteen hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. This course includes a complete dissection of the 
human bodj% including the central nervous system. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in 
his work by competent demonstrators. Practical examina- 
tions are held at frequent intervals throughout the session 
and each student will be held to strict account for material 
furnished him. Each student is furnished a skeleton and a 
deposit is required to insure its return in good condition at 
the end of the session. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, ten 
hours each week during first semester; three hours each week 
during second semester. The most important part of the 
work will be done in the laboratory, vrhere each student will 
be provided vfith apparatus, staining fluids and material neces- 
sary for the preparation of specimens for m.iscroscopical 
examination. An important aid to the course is the projec- 
tion miscroscope and balopticon which are used for the pro- 



38 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

jection upon a screen, of magnified images of the specimens 
actually used in the laboratory, and of illustrations from 
standard text books. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work; one hour each 
week during the first semester, and seven hours each week 
during the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the 
chick and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryol- 
ogy. In the laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its 
various stages of development, and sections of the chick at 
different periods of incubation will be made and studio 
microscopically. The latter part of the course will be devoted 
to the study of sections through different regions of mam- 
malian embryos. 

Special emphasis is laid upon the development in the human. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D _ _ _ Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M,D....." Associate Professor of Physiology 

Ferdinand A. Ries, M.D „.... _ Associate in Physiology 

George A. Knipp, M.D _..... ...._ Instructor in Physiology 

1. Physiology. The required course consists of lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work, demonstrations and conferences 
in the first and second years. 

I^'irst Year, Two periods weekly of one hour each are given 
during the second half of the first year. These lectures are de- 
voted to a general survey of the subject; the application of 
physical and physico-chemical methods to experimental physi- 
ology; the application of statistical methods and the presen- 
tation of results. The physiology of vision is also covered in 
lectures, the laboratory work being given in the second year. 

Second Year. Three one-hour periods weekly throughout 
the year are devoted to lectures, recitations and demonstra- 
tions. Three hours weekly during the first semester and six 
hours per week during the second semester are spent in the 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

laboratory. In the laboratory students work in small groups 
with complete sets of apparatus. The work is arranged to 
illustrate fundamental principles and at the same time to fa- 
miliarize the student with methods employed in experimental 
physiology and medicine. The laboratory results are discussed 
at informal conferences. The subjects covered in the didactic 
and laboratory work include muscle, nerve, electro-physiology, 
blood, lymph, circulation, respiration, digestion, absorption, 
secretion, nutrition, internal secretions, nervous system and 
special senses. A considerable part of the laboratory work is 
upon mammals. Consultation of original papers at the library 
is required and current articles are discussed. 

2. Clinical Physiology. During the second semester of 
the second year a one-hour clinic is held each week by the 
Department of Medicine to correlate physiology and medicine 
and serve as an introduction to the work of the clinical years. 

3. Research. Hours to be arranged. The facilities of the 
laboratory are available to qualified persons to undertake orig- 
inal investigations. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY. 

Frank W. Kachtel, M.D _ Professor of Bacteriology 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D _....„ Professor of Bacteriology 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D _ Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the second year during the first semester. This 
includes the various methods of preparation and sterilization 
of culture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bac- 
teriological examination of water r^nd milk. The bacteriolog- 
ical diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also included in 
this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also 
studied in the laboratory. The principles of general bacteri- 
ology are taught by quiz, conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by m.eans of 
quizzes, conferences and lectures to the second year class 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUP^ 

throughout the second semester, and practical experiments are 
carried out by the class in laboratory sessions of three hours 
each, held twice weekly during the semester. During the ses- 
sion of 1926-27, however, immunology will be taught in the 
first semester of the second year. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D. _ ...Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Instructor in Biological Chemistry 

Instruction in Biolo^cal Chemistry comprises laboratory 
work, lectures and student conferences. 

Laboratory Work. The laboratory work consists in the study 
of indicators and volumetric and buffer solutions, followed by 
a series of experiments illustrating the physical and chemical 
properties of carbohydrates, proteins and lipins. Subsequently 
enzymes, the tissues of the body, and, finally, bile, milk and the 
more thorough investigations of the chemistry of urine and 
blood conclude the assigned experimental work. 

Lectures. The lectures precede or run parallel to the as- 
signed laboratory work. The first lectures treat of laboratory 
technic, the chemistry of indicators and solutions, osmosis, 
diffusion, dialysis, colloids, the law of mass action, catalysis, 
reversible reactions and finally enzymes. The following lec- 
tures refer to the chemistry and metabolism of water, salts, 
other inorganic substances, carbohydrates, proteins and lipins 
and end with a discussion of the effect of diets deficient in the 
accessory food factors. The final lectures relate to the secre- 
tions and excretions. 

The student conferences are conducted by one of the in- 
structors. These gatherings take the form of written quizzes 
or informal oral quizzes. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

PHARMACOLOGY AMD MATERIA MEDICA. 

William Henry Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

O. G. Harne, A.B - Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne _ Assistant in PhaiTnacology 

_ _ _ ...._ Assistant in Pharmacology 

1. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 56 hours required. 
The methods now used in presenting the subject matter of 

Materia Medica and Prescription Writing have evolved as a 
result of some years of practical teaching. The science of 
Pharmacology has introduced methods of critical analysis in 
the choice of drugs proposed for use as medicine. As aids in 
determining the particular drugs chosen for study, use is 
made of the "United States Pharmacopoeia" and *'New and 
Non-Official Remedies." 

Official titles, whenever practicable, are expressed in Eng- 
lish and all quantities are stated in terms of the metric system. 
The only way to get away from the unscientific system of Eng- 
lish weights and measures, and from a Latin system which 
few ever learn correctly is to refuse to teach either one of 
them. 

When possible, drugs are grouped according to their chem- 
ical composition and the influence of various radicals and side 
chains emphasized, whereas drugs, the chemistry of which 
is not definitely established, are grouped according to their 
dominant physiological action. Following the Pharmacology 
of a given group, their place in practical medicine is indicated, 
and the student is requested to prescribe same in suitable 
form. Thus a Materia Medica is developed throughout the 
course, based upon Pharmacological action of drugs. 

2. Systematic Pharmacology. 96 hours required. Second 
year. In this portion of the course, the student is taught 
Pharmacology as a pure science. The aim is to attain a mean 
between that which has a purely scientific bearing and that 
dominantly practical so that both a critical attitude toward 
drugs, and an understanding of the principles of dosage may 
be acquired. This is accomplished by lectures, quiz, confer- 
ence and the following course of laboratory exercises. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. 96 hours. Second year. This lab- 
oratory course runs parallel with Pnarmacology 2. Many of 



42 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

the most important problems of Immunology, Parasitic intoxi- 
cations, and of Chemotherapy are essentially Pharmacological. 
In the first part of the course the experiments are upon normal 
animals, hence primarily toxocological in character. In the 
latter part of the course more and m.ore emphasis is laid upon 
what is now designated as chemo-therapeutic index of drugs. 

4. Pharmacology of General and Local Anesthetics and So- 
porifics. Four weeks, 3 lectures, 3 laboratory periods a week. 
This is a special course designed to meet the needs of physician 
and graduate nurse who v/ish to acquire a knowledge of the 
more recent developments in the pharmacology of depressant 
and sleep producing drugs. The course is so arranged that 
those properly qualified may continue the v/ork under expert 
anesthetists in the wards of the hospitals connected with the 
university. Professor Schultz. 

5. Research in Pharmacology and Chemo-Therapy. Prop- 
erly qualified students are admitted to the laboratory with a 
view to their carrying on original investigations in drug ac- 
tion. Thoroughly equipped laboratories are well adapted for 
post-graduate study and research in Pharmacology. Hours 
will be arranged to suit the applicant. Professor Schultz. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, M.D _ Associate Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D _ _ _ Associate in Pathology 

M. Alexander Novey, M.D „ Instructor in Pathology 

H. E. Peters, M.D _ _ _ Instructor in Pathology 

Monte Edwards, M.D _ Assistant in Pathology 

Lawrence S. Otell, M.D. _.... _...._ ..Assistant in Pathology 

Vv^elch England, M.D _.... Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in Pathology are given during the 
second and third years. These courses are based on previous 
study of normal structure and function and aim to outline the 
natural history of disease. Instruction is made as practical 
as possible that the student may become familiar with the ap- 
X)earance of tissues in disease and may be able to correlate 
anatomical lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

1. General Pathology and Histo-Pathology. This course is 
given to second year students. It includes the study and dem- 
onstration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances of 
structure, nutrition and metabohsm of cells, disturbances of 
fat, cai'bohydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pig- 
ment metabolism, inflammation and tumors. The laboratory 
course consists in a daily preliminary talk on the subject for 
study, following which the student takes up the study of micro- 
scopical sections. Gross material from autopsy and from the 
museum is demonstrated in conjunction with the microscopical 
sections. 

2. Applied Pathology, Including Gross Morbid Anatomy a7id 
Morbid Physiology. Third year students : In this course the 
special relationship of the gross and microscopical lesions to 
clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. Fresh material 
from autopsy collected at the various hospitals is demonstrated 
and supplemented by a study of the respective autopsy proto- 
cols. 

3. Autopsies. Third Year. Autopsy technic is taught to 
small groups of students by special instruction at autopsies 
performed at the various hospitals. Students are required ta 
assist at the autopsy, study the organs, examine the micro- 
scopical sections, make cultures and prepare autopsy protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference.... Fourth Year. In col- 
laboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from 
autopsies is studied w^ith reference to the correlation of the 
clinical aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified stu- 
dents will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work 
along the lines of experimental pathology. 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D - _.... Professor of Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D . Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D....Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. GlCHNER, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D _ Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D ...Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D _ .....Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D - - Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

H. D. McCarty, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D — Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D .....Associate Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D „ Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

C. C. Habliston, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

L, a. M. Krause, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Reed Rockwood, A.B., M.S., M.D .....Associate in Medicine 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. C. Metzel, M.D _ .._ Associate in Clinical Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D ._ Associate in Clinical Medicine 

n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 



Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor 

H. R. Peters, M.D Instructor 

William Michel, M.D. Instructor 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Instructor 

Edward Novak, M.D Instructor 

F. L. Badagliacca, M.D Instructor 

F. T. Kyper, M.D _.... _.... _ Assistant 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor 

A. A. SUSSMAN, M.D Instructor 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D. _ _ Assistant 

M. G. Gichner, M.D _ „. .....Assistant 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D .....Assistant 

W. H. Woody, M.D „...._ Assistant 

Thomas B. Turner, M.D _ _ Assistant 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

GENERAL OUTLINE. 

Secx)ND Ykar. 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagr.osis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester.) 
(2 hours a week, second semester). 

(b) Clinical lectures on pathological physiology. 

(1 hour a week, second semester). 

Third Year. 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient depart- 
ment and in the clinical laboratory. 
II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neu- 
rology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical 
therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year, 
The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 

(26 hours a week for ten weeks). 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical 
exam.ination, laboratory examinations and progress notes of 
assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 
(6 hours a week). 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work. 
The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the Univer- 
sity Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each 
student spends two periods a week of two hours each in dis- 
pensary work. The work is done in groups of four to six stu- 
dents under an instiiictor. Systematic history taking is espe- 
cially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. The stu- 



46 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

dent becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic 
disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis. 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions in topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and 
each section receives instruction for four hours a week for the 
entire session in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The 
large clinical material of the dispensaries and hospitals is util- 
ized to give each student the opportunity to familiarize him- 
self with the common types of bodily structure, with the nor- 
mal variations in physical signs and with the physical signs of 
the chief pulmonary, circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

Therapeutics. 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are 
taken up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the 
chief diseases is then revievv^ed. Two hours a week. Dr. 
Lockard. 

The principles of physical therapy are taught in a special 
lecture and demonstration course consisting of six one-hour 
periods. Dr. Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the prac- 
tical application of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching 
and the chief therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

Tuberculosis. 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in 
physical diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sec- 
tions of the class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. 
Stress is laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the 
disease, as well as upon its symptomatology and gross 
pathology. 

Syphilis. 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of S3T)hilis 
will be dealt with in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic man- 
agement of syphilis will be offered in the dispensary. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D _ (Head of Departir.ent 

j Assistant Professor of Medicme 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D - Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. R. Miller, M.D .- Associate Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. _ - Associate in Medicine 

F. T. Kyper, M.D ...._ Instructor in Medicine 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D. Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in 
the technique of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he 
is able to perform all routine examination which may be called 
for during his fourth year, in connection with the work in the 
wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic 
lectures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff 
of the department takes an active part. The microscopical 
and chemical study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric 
juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively taken up, 
and special attention directed to the clinical significance of 
the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting 
agent and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student is 
provided with a microscope, blood counters and hemoglobino- 
meter for his exclusive use, and every two students with a 
special laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has 
learned during the preceding year in the laboratories of the 
various affiliated hospitals. He is also supplied vvith a labora- 
tory outfit which is sufnciently complete to enable him to work 
independently of the general equipment. Special instructors 
are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GASTROENTEROLOGY. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. Professor of Gastro-Enteroiogy 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D _ -....- Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D _ Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D...Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D -...- Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D _ Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Morgan, M.D _ _ _ Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppleman, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterdogy 

N. J. Davidov, M.D. - .....Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Ai-bert Eisenberg, M.D. Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

I. S. Zinberg, M.D „....- Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph N. Zierler, M.D. _ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Isidore I. Levy, M.D. Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

C. D. Steenken, M.D _ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year. Clinics, recitations and demonstrations to 
the class for one hour a week throughout the session. Dispen- 
saiy instniction to small groups throughout the entire session. 
Practical instruction in the differential and clinical diagnosis 
and demonstrations of the newer methods of diagnosis in gas- 
tro-intestinal affections. 

PSYCHIATRY. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D _ _ Professor of Psychiatry 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D _ ..Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D _....„ „ Instructor in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen 
clinical lectures and five clinics which are designed to be in- 
troductory to the more intensive work in psychiatry in the 
fourth year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical 
conferences on selected groups of cases. Each student works 
for a shoii: period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic 
and thus gains practical experience of the problems of history 
taking, examination, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



49 



PEDIATRICS. 



John Ruhrak, M.D. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D.. 



...Professor of 
...Professor of 



Edgar R. Friedenwald, M.D Clinical Professor of 

C. LORING JOSLIN, M.D. -....- ....Assistant Professor of 

W. H. Ingram, M.D -....- Associate 

H. H. Warner, M.D _ _ Associate 

\V. J. Todd, M.D. _ - Instructor 

John H. Traband, M.D Instructor 

William F. Geyer, M.D _ - Instructor 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D -.... -...._ Instructor 

W. E. Brent, M.D - ....-._ - Instructor 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D. _..... _ .....Jnsti-uctor 

Bern.'OId J. Ferry, M.D - Assistant 

George E. Wells, M.D. -... .....Assistant 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D _..... Assistant 

G. A. Knipp, M.D _ _....- Assistant 

J. J. McGarrell, M.D _ - Assistant 

H. A. Rutledge, M.D - Assistant 



Albert Jaffe, M.D 

R. M. Hening, M.D 

Marie Kovner, M.D 

A. G. Webster, M.D 

Ephraim Meyer, M.D ...._ 

Rachel Korotky, M.D. 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D 



- Assistant 

....Assistant 

- Assistant 

Assistant 

.- ....Assistant 

Assistant 

._ ....Assistant 



Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 



Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of 
one lecture each week in which infant feeding and the most 
important diseases of infancy and childhood are especially em- 
phasized. Drs. Summers and Friedenwald. 

Fourth Year. During this year a weekly clinical lecture is 
given where the character of disease is fully demonstrated and 
the students are afforded an opportunity for personal exam- 
ination of all cases. In addition ward classes are held weekly 
where bedside instruction is given. A section of the class also 
works daily at the Babies' and Children's Clinic. This clinic, 
which is under the direction of Dr. Summers, has a yearly at- 
tendance of more than twenty thousand, and offers an excel- 
lent opportunity for study and observation of a vvide variety 
of cases under competent instructors. 

Instruction is also given on the Children's Ward at the 
Mercy Hospital. 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

NEUROLOGY. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D _.... Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., LL.D., M.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A,B., M.D Associate Professor of Neurology 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D..., Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology 

MiLFORD Levy, M.D _ Associate in Neurology 

J. A. Skladov^^SKY, M.D ...._ ....._ Assistant in Neurology 

H. W. Rosenthal, M.D _ Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week 
to the entire class. Instruction in clinical neurology two hours 
a week at the City Hospital to small groups. By means of 
didactic lectures and clinical conferences there are considered 
the commoner types of diseases of the nervous system, the 
methods of neurological examination, and the relationship of 
signs and symptoms to pathological conditions. The material 
at University and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference, one hour each week to 
the entire class. This subject is taught at the University and 
Mercy Hospitals. All cases presented at these clinics are care- 
fully examined ; complete written records are made by the stu- 
dents who demonstrate the cases before the class. The cases 
are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are pre- 
sented, and each student in the class must prepare one or more 
cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in 
close personal contact with the cases in the wards under the 
supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four after- 
noons each week. In this way students are brought into contact 
with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later manifes- 
tations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

J. F. Hogan, M.D. _ Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year, Two lectures a week throughout the session. 

The lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: Air, 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

Water, Soil, Food, Disposal of Wastes, Communicable Diseases, 
State and Federal Public Health Laws, and Industrial Diseases. 
Small groups visit the Sydenham Hospital weekly and are 
given practical instruction in the diagnosis, treatment and iso- 
lation of the contagious diseases. 

Fourth Year. Small groups visit the City Board of Health 
Laboratories for practical instruction in the laboratory field 
a«nd administrative aspects of public health work. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. One hour each week for one semester. 

Inasmuch as Medical Jurisprudence teaches the application of 
every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, civil 
or criminal, this course embraces the f oUov/ing : — Proceedings in 
criminal and civil prosecution ; medical evidence and testimony ; 
identity in its general relations ; sexual abnormalities ; personal 
identity; impotence and sterihty; rape; criminal abortions; 
signs of death; wounds in their medico-legal relations; death, 
natural and homicidal; malpractice; insanity and medico-legal 
autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D _ Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Joseph H. Bkanham, M.D _ Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D _...._ Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D _ „ Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Elliot H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D _ Associate Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D _ Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D Assoc'te Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Associate Professor of Surgeiy 

E. H. HaywaPvD, M.D ...._ „ _ ..........Associate in Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate in Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D.._ _ ...._ ...Associate in Surgery 

E. S. Johnson, M.D _ ..Associate in Surgery 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate in Surgery 

M. J. Hanna, M.D „ Associate in Surgery 

H. M. Foster, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

F. X. Kearney, M.D _ ..Instructor in Surgery 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Charles "W. Maxson, M.D _.... Instructor in Surgery 

C. F. HoRiNE, M.D _.... Instructor in Surgery 

DwiGHT MOHR, M.D _ Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. R. Geraghty, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D _ Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde Marvel, M.D ._ Assistant in Surgeiy 

EvERARD Briscoe, M.D _ ...Assistant in Surgery 

I. 0. RiDGELY, M.D _ _ Assistant in Surgery 

H. B. McElwain, M.D .....Assistant in Surgery 

D. J. Passagno, M.D _ „.... Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D - - .._._ ...Assistant in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D ...Assistant in Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D _ Assistant in Surgery 

James Brown, M.D _ Assistant in Surgery 

E. \V. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D _ Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D ^ ...Assistant in Surgery 

J. 0. "Warfield, A.m., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the Anatomical Laboratory and the 
dispensaries, wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms 
of the University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and 
dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospital. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dis- 
pensary work, bed-side instruction, ward classes, and clinics. 
The work begins in the second year, and continues through- 
out the third and fourth years. 

Second Year. 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. 10 hours a week for 
the first semester. The course is designed to bridge the gap 
betv/een anatomy in the abstract, and clinical anatomy as ap- 
plied to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and stu- 
dents are required to demonstrate ail points, outlines, and 
regions on the cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected 
when necessary to bring out outlines and relations of struc- 
tures. 

Didactic Lectures. Tw^o hours a w^eek for one semester, aug- 
mented by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cress 
section. Dr. Holland. 

Laboratory. Eight hours a week for the first semester. 
Dr. Hanna, assisted by Drs. Brady, Hundley, Warfield, Boyd 
and Mr. Clark. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CUPwRICULUM 53 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history taking, 
records of physical examinations and of operations and prog- 
ress notes ; the preparation of surgical dressings, suture mate- 
rials and solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, 
gangrene, fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage and shock ; the use 
of spHnts, bed frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local 
anaesthesia and the preparation of patients for operations. 
Lectures and conferences. Two hours per week for one semes- 
ter to the entire class. Dr. Edwards. 

Third Year. 

General and Regicmol Surgery. Principles of surgery and 
general surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to 
the entire class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Dr. Shipley. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in 
history-taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at 
the bedside and in the dead-house of the Baltimore City Hos- 
pital. Drs. Shipley, Lynn and Reifschneider. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative sur- 
gery upon the cavader and on dogs. The class is divided into 
sections, and each section is given practical and individual 
work under the supervision of the instructors. Dr. Frank S. 
Lynn, assisted hy Drs. Nathan Winslow, Locher, Hayward, E. 
S. Johnson, Foster, Geraghty, Demarco, Horine, Pessagno, 
Onnen, Maxson, W. R. Johnson, Buchness, Hanrahan, Brown, 
Steinmueller and Warfield. 

Fractures and Dislocations. Twenty-four hours to the en- 
tire class. This course consists of instruction in the various 
forms of fractures and dislocations and their treatment, and 
serves as a preparatory course for clinical work. Drs. Wise 
and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensaj-y. Under supervision, the student takes 
the history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the 
diagnosis, and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of 
the ambulatory surgical cases in the University and in the 
Mercy Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Dv/ight Mohr, Ridg- 
ley, Passagno, Briscoe and McElwain. University Hospital — 
Drs. Holland, Lynn, Nathan Winslow, Edv/ards, E. S. Johnson 
and Foster. 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Fourth Year. 

Clinics. A weekly clinic will be given at the Mercy and at 
the University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the 
year. As far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy 
Hospital — Dr. McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the oper- 
ating-room and museum are studied in the gross and micro- 
scopically, in relation with the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treat- 
ment of accident cases, with instructions as to the relation- 
ship between the state, the employee, the employer, and the 
physician's duty to each. One hour a week to sections of the 
class throughout the year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of University and of 
Mercy Hospitals, history taking, and phj^sical examination of 
patients, laboratory examinations, attendance at operations 
and observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will 
consist of ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the 
after care of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlan- 
nan, Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Chamibers. University 
Hospital — Drs. Shipley, Holland, Edmunds, Lynn and Ed- 
wards. 

ANAESTHESIA. 

Second Year. 

Lectures on history of anaesthesia: Ancient and Modern. 
General physiology of anaesthesia. Special physiology of each 
anaesthetic agent. Different methods for producing general 
anaesthesia, with a detailed description of each. The selec- 
tion of the anaesthetic and method best suited for its admin- 
istration in particular cases. Difficulties and accidents during 
and following anaesthesia, their causes, prevention and con- 
trol. Different m.ethods of resuscitation. Blood pressure : Its 
significance and bearing on selection of the anaesthetic and 
use as a guide during anaesthesia. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 55 

Eight hours to the entire class. Drs, S. Griffith Davis and 
W. G. Queen. 

Fourth Year. 

During the clinics and operations before small groups, each 
student will be required to observe the administration of an- 
aesthetics and to keep a chart recording blood pressure, pulse 
and respiration under the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., M.D _ Professor of Dermatology 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

A. C. MoNNiNGER, M.D _ „.... - _ Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases 
of the skin. Dr. Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction, Univei^sity Hospital, Mondays, Wed- 
nesdays and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the 
common skin diseases. Drs. Abercrombie, Robinson and 
Gately. Dispensary instruction, Mercy Hospital. Dr. Rosen- 
thal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY. 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D _.. Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D _ Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D „ Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

W. H. Daniels, M.D _ Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

H. L. Rogers, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient in- 
struction will be given. This instruction is provided in the 
University Hospital Amphitheater and in the Dispensary, 
Mercy Hospital and Dispensary and Keman Hospital and In- 
dustrial School for Crippled Children at ''Radnor Park," and 
in the Dispensary of same at 620 West Lombard Street. 

Lectures, clinics and quizzes will be held at each of the hos- 
pitals once a v^eek. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic will 
be held for small sections of the class at "Radnor Park." 



56 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and in- 
struments required in this surgical specialty, including X-Ray 
interpretation; Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; 
deformities of the feet ; non-tuberculous affliction of bone and 
joints ; the paralyses ; the bursal, tendinous and muscular con- 
ditions producing orthopaedic affections; rickets, scurvy; os- 
teomalacia; chondro-dystrophies ; wry-neck and the use and 
application of orthopaedic apparatus. 

ROENTGENOLOGY AND RADIOTHERAPY. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D _ Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, M.D _._ Professor of Roentgenology 

Charles Reid Edw^jids, A.B., M.D „ Associate in Radio Therapy 

Hc\VARD E. ASHBURY, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

Instruction is given in the history, physics, and practical ap- 
plication of Roentgen Rays and Radium. Especial effort is 
mxade to demonstrate the use of the Roentgen Ray in diagnosis 
by instruction in both fluroscopy and plate reading. The sec- 
tions of the fourth year class receive two hours instruction 
each week. 

The student is also taught the practical application of Rad- 
ium and Roentgen Rays as therapeutic agents. In the X-Ray 
laboratory and in the hospital wards students are shown the 
use of these agents in the treatment of disease. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE 

Edw, a. Looper, M.D Clinical Prof, of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Frank B. Anderson. M.D.. Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
R. F. McKenzie, M.D Instinictor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the com- 
mon diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially 
directed to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance 
of focal infections in the etiology of general diseases and mod- 
em methods of diagnosis. Lectures are illustrated by lantern 
slides. Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily to small sec- 
tions at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat practical 
cases under an instructor. Ward classes and clinical demon- 
strations are given one and one-half hours weekly throughout 
the session in the University and the Mercy Hospitals. 

GENrrO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D _ Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

!W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. 

i Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

j Harris Goldman, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

(Austin H. Wood, M.D _ Associate in Genito-Uiinary Diseases 

I A. J. GiLLls, M.D ..„ Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

JL. K. Fargo, M.D ..„ Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. C. Knapp, M.D „ Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

[H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

!j. H. Collison, M.D _ Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

'Monte Edwards, M.D - A.ssistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

'L. J. MiLLAN, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

[William Emrich, M.D _ Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

T. Willis Guyton, M.D _ _ Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Third Year. 8 hours to the entire class. This course is a 
didactic one in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. 
' Toulson. 

I Fourth Year. Tlie course includes urethroscopy, cystos- 

f copy, ureter catheterization, renal functional tests, urography, 

I urine cultures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the 

amphitheater, ward rounds, and attendance by members of 

the Senior class upon out patients in the dispensary. The dis- 

1 pensary classes are carried on both at the Mercy and the Uni- 

\ versity Hospital dispensaries. In the latter institution, the 

Maryland State Department of Health conducts a venereal 

disease clinic, in which 20,133 \isits were paid last year. 

Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered, and this 

rich wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. In 

addition to this, a cystocopic clinic is conducted in another 

part of the dispensary, where the students are given practical 

instruction in the m.odern diagnostic methods. 



58 OEGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Ch/jiles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. 6 hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rec- 
tum and anus, and will cover the essential features of the anat- 
omy and physiology of the large intestine as well as the vari- 
ous diseases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum. 

The class is divided into sections for clinical instruction in 
the Baltimore City Hospital. Dr. Linthicum. 

Fourth Year. Ward and Dispensary instruction is given 
in the University and Mercy Hospitals where different phases 
of the various diseases are taught by direct observation and 
examination. The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope 
and examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar 
to each student. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Blake and Rosenthal. 
University Hospital — Drs. Linthicum and Reeder. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

J. M. H. Ro^vland, M.D _ Professor of Obstetrics 

George W. Dobbin, M.D _ Professor of Obstetrics 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D „ Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D _... _ Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

J. McF. Be?.gland, M.D. Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D „ _ _ Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D _ _ Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Re^se. M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. G. MURIL4Y, Jr., A.B., M.D _ Instructor in Obstetrics 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D _ _ Instructor in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

J. J. Erwin, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Isadore H. Siegel, M.D. Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by 
Drs. Dobbin, Bergland, Novak, Murray, Douglass and Row- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 59 

land to entire class. Manikin Work, Drs. Brack, Smith and 
Erwin to sections of class at Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Doug- 
lass, Reese, Bowe, Novey and Rowland at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week 
Drs. Rowland, Douglass, Murray and Lazenby. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sec- 
tions of class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese, 
Bov/e, Novey and Rowland at University Hospital. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY. 

William S. Gardner, M.D _ Professor of Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.M _ Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D _ Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D _ Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Geo. a. Strauss, M.D _ _ _ Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Vv^iLLSE, M.D _ _ Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D ...Assistant in Gynecology 

.J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Assistant in Gjmecology 

Leo. Brady, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Wot^k, A course of thirty lectures 
and recitations. 

Clinical Wcyt^k. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in 
the ward, makes a general physical examination, including 
the blood and urine, before the patient is brought before the 
class. One student under supervision gives the anaesthetic, a 
pelvic examination is made by six students, and any operation 
required is then done before a section of the class small enough 
to see clearly what is being done and how it is done. On a sub- 
sequent day the whole group examine microscopically sections 
prepared from, material removed from, patients that have been 
before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

PIarry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D..._ Prof, of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J W. Downey, M.D. Clinical Professor of Otology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D .._ Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

PI. K. Fleck, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology^ 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 



60 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Third Ysar. First semester, Course in Diseases of the Eye. 
Sept. 28th to January 23rd. Dr. Harry Friedenwald. 

Course in Diseases of the Ear, second semester. Dr. Dow- 
ney. 

Practical Course in Ophthalmoscopy, once weekly, in sec- 
tions. Dr. Kemler. 

Fourth Year. Clinics in Diseases of the Eye a7id Ear, 
weekly. Drs. Harry Friedenwald and Downey. 

Ward Studies of ocular and aural lesions associated with 
general medical diseases, once weekly in sections. Dr. Fried- 
enwald. 

Dispensary Instr-uction, daily to small sections. Drs. Kahn, 
Fleck, Downey and Kemler. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otologj' are designed to 
familiarize the students with the common diseases of the eye 
and ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view to meet 
the needs of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is 
laid upon the relation between diseases of the eye and the ear 
and systemic diseases and diseases of other organs. 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE. 

A course of ten lectures will be given on the History of Medi- 
cine. These lectures will be given once weekly during Marcii, 
April and May by Dr. John R. Oliver. 



SCHEDULE 61 

FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester, 1926-1927 



Hoars 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 
9 to 10 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Laboratoi-y 

Histology & 
Embrjology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Anatomy 

Laboratory 
& C. H. 


letoll 


Laboratory 

Biological 

Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratoi-y 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


11 to 

i2.oe 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




12 M. 

to 

1 P.M. 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 

Transfer 




1 to 1.30 


Lunch 


Biological 
Chemistry 

A. H. 


Lunch 




l.SO to 2 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 

C. H., A. n.. & 
Laborat«r>' 




2 to 4.30 


C. H., A. H., & A. H., & \C. H.. A. H.. & 
Laboratory LaboratJ>rj- l LaboratoiT 


Anatomy 




4.30 to 5 








C. H., A. H., & 
Lalioratory 







FIRST YEAR SCHEBULE— Second Semester, 1926-1927 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


V/ednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 

9.30 


Biologicjil 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Laboratory 

Histr;Iogi- & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


laboratory 

Histology & 
Embrjologs^ 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Anatomy 

Laboratory 
& C. H. 


9.80 to 
10.30 


I^aboratory 

Biological 

Chemist rj' 

Section B 


Laboi-atorj" 

Biological 

Chemistry 

Se<?tion A 


10.30 to 
11.30 


T.ansfcr 




11.30 to 
12.30 P. M. 


Physiology 
P. & S. 34 


Lu.nch and 
Ti-anKfcr 


Physiology 
A. II. 




12.30 to 1 


Lunch 


Lurch and 
Transfer 


Lunch 


Lorch 




1 to 1.30 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A.M. 




1.30 to 2 


♦Anatomy 

C.H.,A. H., & 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 

A. H., & 

Laboratory 


Anatomy 

C. H.. A. H., & 

Laboratory 


Anatomy 

C. H.. A. H., & 

Laboratory 




2 to 4.30 


Anatomy 

C. H., A. H., & 
Laboratory 




4.30 to 5 












A, H. Ai 
C. H.— C 

Anatomy 
Biologica 
P. & S.- 
* Neur-al 


latomical Hall- 
hemical Hall— I 
Laboratory — T 
Chemisti-y La 
-N. W. Cor. Cb 
Anatomy after 


-Upi>e,r Hall, 1 
X)wer Hall. N. 
bird Floor. Gr 
boratoiv — Thirt 
ilvert and Sara 
April 9, 1927. 


vT. E. Cor. Ix)n 
E. Cor. Lombaj 
ay Laborat-ory, 
3 Floor. Dental 
toga Streets 


ibard and Gree 
rd and Greene 
Lombard and 
Building, Lom 
fiooms indicate! 


ne Streets. 
Streets. 

Greene Streets 
bard and Gree 
a on Second F 


ne Streeta. 
oor. 



62 SCHEDULE 

SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester, 1926-1927 



Hours 


Monday I Tu9S4Jay 


"Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A, M. 
9 to 10 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 




10 to 11 


Physiologn'^ 
C.H. 


Bioiogical 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Pharmacology 
C,H. 


Physiology 
A. H. 


11 to 12 

12 M. to 
12.30 P. M. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Pharmacolog-y 
A. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Pharmacologj- 
A. K. 




Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 




j_.uncn 
P.M. ! 
12.30 to 1 j 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


Laboratory 

Immunology 
& Serology 

P. & S. 32 




1 to 1.30 




Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




1.30 to 
2.30 


Laboratory & Serology 
Pharmacology F. & S. 32 


Medicine 
P. & S. 33 


Immunology 
& Seir)iopry 
P. & S. 34 




2.30 to 
3.30 


Physiology 
Section B 




Laboratory 
& P. & S. 33 

Surgical 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 

& P. & S. 33 

Sur-ica: 
Anatory 




3.30 to 4 


Laboratory 
P. & S. 

Surgical 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
P. & S. 

Surgical 
Anatomy 




4 to 5.30 







SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester. 1926-1927 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 

Chemistry 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 




9.30 to 


Physiology 
C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Pharmacology 
C. H. 




10.30 


Physiology 
A.H. 


10.30 to 
11.30 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 




11.30 to 
12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Pharmacology 
AH. 


P.M. 

12 to 1 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology . 


Laboratory 

Pathology 


Medical Clinic 
Amp. 


1 to 2 




2 to 3 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Pharmacologry 

Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 
Disp. 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Pharmacologj'' 
Section B 




3 to 4 




4 to 5 







A. H. — Anatomical Hall, Upper Kail, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Kail — Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streecs. 
Laboratories : 

Biological Chemistry — Third Floor, Dental Building. Lombar dand Greene Street?!. 

Pathology — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratoo'. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second and Fourth Floors. 



SCHEDULE 
THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 



63 



lours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


\.M. 
.30 to 

9.30 


Therapeutics 
A. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
A. H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Medicine 
A. H. 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


>.30 to 
iP.M. 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensarj- 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 
Lunch 


ito2 


r^edical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 33 


Gyr)eco)og>' 
P. & S. 34 


1.15 to 4.15 

Clinical 
Pathology 
Laboratory 

V. & S. 32 


Transfer 


15 to 
3.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


2.30-4.30 
Section A 
Clinical 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Gross 
Pathology 
at Bay View 


*2 to 3.15 
Eye 

P. & S. 34 


2-4 
Section B 
Clinical 
Medicine 


,15 to 
!4.15 


Clinical 
rathologj' 
P. & S. 34 


Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


,1 

4.15 
' to 

|5.15 

i 


Pediatrics 
A.H. 


*0bpietr!cs 

<:. H. 

-'Enr 
C. H. 


2.15-4.15 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
Practical 

Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 
Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 
P. & S. 34 


Preventive 
Medicine 

P. & S. 34 





Yom 10.30 A.M. to 1.00 P.M. the class is divided into two sections, one section reporting at 
vert and Saratoga Streets, the other at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
'. H. — Chemical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
k.. H. — Anatomical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Lmp.-Amphitheatre— University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
& S. — N, W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 

At the beginning of the second semester Section "A" at Bay View on Saturdays, 2-4 P. M.. and 
iversity Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.15-4.15 P.M.; Section "B" at Bay View on Wednesdays, 
!;>-4.30 P.M. 

First Semester. 

Second Semester. 



64 



SCHEDULE 
FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 



Tuesday 



Wednesday i Thursday 

i 



8.30 to 
11.00 



Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Surgei-y 
Obstetrics 



Ward Classes ; Ward Classes j Ward Classes | Ward Classes 



Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 



Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 



Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 



Medicine 
Surgery 
Obstetrics 



Ward Classea 

Medicine 
Surgery 



Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Univ.See.Ainp.i 
P. & S. Sec 51 



Medical Clinical 

Clinic I Pathological 
Univ. Sec. Amp.! Conference 



Surgical 
Clinic 



Medical 
Clinic 



Univ. Sec-Amp. Univ. Sec.Amp.: 



Surgical I Univ. Sec. C.H. 
Pathology |p. & S. Sec 3S!p. & S. Sec. 5l|p & s Sec ssl^* 
P. & S. Sec. 40 



Pediatrica 

Clinic 

UniT.SecAnp. 



P.M. 
12 to 2 



Dispensary ' Dispensary 
Lunch and and 

Transfer | Lunch 



Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 



Dermatology 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 



Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 



Neurology I 
Clinic I 

Unir. Sec Amp. 

P. & S. Sec 33 



Eye and Ear Obstetrical 
Clinic I Clinic 

(Full Class at I (Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) ; Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. Amp. 



Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 



Gastro-Enter- j 
ology Clinic i 



Genito- 
urinary 



(Full Class at: 
Univ. Hosp.) jp, & S. Sec 51 
I 
Amp. ! 



P. & S. Sec I 
Ward Classes I 



Ward Classes 



P. & S. Sec i '"'"''^^^ Classes | Ward Classes ■ 
Ward Classes I Medicine 



Medicine | Therapeutics 

Urology i Proctology 

Eye and Ear i Radiotheraphy 



Medicine jNose & Throat 
Roentgenology' 
Preventive ' Physical | 
Medicine | Therai^utics 



Univ. Sec. 

V/ard Classes! 

Medicine j 
Urolo-ry ' 



Univ. Sec. 
Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Roentgenolog: 
Eye and Ear 



5 to 6 P.M. 

March, 

April and 

May 

History of 

Medicine 

C. H. 



Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Neurology 
Psychiatry 



The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Street*, 
the other at Calvert and Saratoga Sti-eets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups^ — Medical, Surgical, and Special. These 
groups will rotate on the following dates: 



FIRST SEMESTER 
Ist period, Sept. 27 to Oct. 30 
2nd period. Nov. 1 to Dec. 4. 
3rd period, l>ec. 6 to Jan. 22. 



SECOND SEMESTER 
1st period, Jan. 24 to Feb. 26. 
2nd period, Feb. 28 to Apr. 9. 
3rd period, Apr. 11 to May 14. 



C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 

P. & S., 33, 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S.. 40, 51 — Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 65 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Med- 
ical Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Regis- 
trar on the basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and 
is essential for admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student 
Certificate are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school 
course or the equivalent, and in addition, at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits, 
including chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this Uni- 
versity. 

(A) HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREI^iENTS. 

Graduation from an accredited high or preparatory school 
after pursuing a four-year course based upon an eight-year 
elementary course or its full equivalent as demonstrated by 
entrance examinations. 

At least fifteen units must be offeredl 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED OR ACCEPTED 

FOR ENTRANCE TO THE PRE-MEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Subjects Units* Required 

Group I, English — 

Literature and Composition — 3-4 3 

Group II, Foreign Languages — 

Latin -._.... -.... - - - 1-4] 

Greek _ - - 1-3 1 2t 

French or German 1-4 f 

Other foreign languages _ l-4j 



..\\ 

%-lJ 



66 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Group III, Mathematics — 

Elementary algebra 1 

Advanced algebra _ __ V^-l 

Plane geometi-y 1 

Solid geometiy _ % 

Trigonometry _ ^a 

Group IV, History — 

Ancient history ... _ . 1| 

Medieval and modern history _ _ 1 

English history . 1 y 

American history 
Civil government 

Group V, Science — 

Botany _ . . Va-l 

Zoology Yz-l 

Chemist i-y _ . _ . . . 1 

Physics . . 1 

Physiography *^-l 

Physiology . _ V2-I 

Astronomy . _ .. ^ 

Geology . _ - %-l 

Group VI, Miscellaneous — 

Agriculture 1-2 

Bookkeeping _ _ _ V2-I 

Business law „ _ _ „ _ V2 

Commercial geography _ ¥2-! 

Domestic science 1-2 

Drawing, freehand and mechanical - V2-2 

Economics and economic history Va-l 

Manual training _ _ 1-2 

Music: Appreciation or harmony 1-2 

*A unit is the credit value of at least thirty-six weeks' work of four 
or five recitation periods per week, each recitation period to be not less 
than forty minutes. In other words, a unit represents a year's study in 
any subject in a secondary school constituting approximately a quarter 
of a full year's work. A satisfactory year's work in any subject cannot 
be accomplished under ordinary circumstances in less than 120 sixty- 
minute hours, or their equivalent. 

fBoth of the required units of foreign language must be of the same 
language, but the two units may be presented in any one of the lan- 
guages specified. 

lOf the fifteen units of high school work, nine units are required, as 
indicated in the foregX)ing schedule; the remainder may be made up 
from any of the other subjects in the schedule, provided that at least 
eleven units must be offered in Groupe I-V. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 67 

(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two 
college sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual in- 
struction, including final examinations. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this 
preliminary college course shall be equal to the work done in 
the freshman and sophomore years in standard colleges and 
universities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in 
physics, chemistry, biology, and English, each course to em- 
brace at least six, eight or twelve hours of work in each sub- 
ject, as shown in the schedule following. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PRE-MEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE. 

Sixty Semester Houn^ Required 

Se waster 
Required Coursss: Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology ( c ) „ _ 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 

A modern foreign language. 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy. 
Psychology. 
Social science. 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting 
of one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less 
than fifty minutes* duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work 
to be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required, of 
which at least eight semester hours must be in general inor- 
ganic chemistry, including four semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative 
analysis may be counted as general inorganic chemistry. The 
remaining four semester hours required shall consist of work 
in organic chemistry. 



68 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at 
least two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes 
a knowledge of plane trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which 
four must be laboratory work. This requirement may be 
satisfied by a course of eight semester hours in either general 
biology or zoology, or by courses of four semester hours each 
in zoology and botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual in- 
troductory college course of six semester hours, or its equiva- 
lent, is required. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

A combined seven years' curriculum is offered, leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. 
The first three years are taken in residence at College Park, 
and the last four years in Baltimore, at the School of Medi- 
cine. The premedical curriculum constitutes the first two 
years' work and the third year follows a general outline of 
prescribed and elective courses approved by the chairman of 
the premedical committee and the dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the 
School of Medicine, and upon the recommendation of the dean, 
the degree of Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this 
combination course offers over the minimum requirements of 
the two years. By completing three years the training may 
be gradually broadened by a wider latitude in the election of 
courses in the arts subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the 
senior year without being candidates for the degree and, there- 
fore, without examination, may receive a certificate of at- 
tendance on completing the full course satisfactorily. 



RULES AND FEES 69 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine are the same as those enforced against undergrad- 
uates admitted to advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses — In the April number of 
the Bulletin detailed announcement vvill be made of the Post- 
graduate Summer Courses, 

RULES. 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the 
course he must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation 
at the end of the fourth year will be required to repeat the 
entire course of the fourth year and to take examination in 
such other branches as may be required, should he be again 
permitted to enter the school as a candidate for gi-aduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will 
be taken into consideration by the Faculty as well as the re- 
sults of his examination. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland are required to provide themselves with 
microscopes of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, 
Spencer Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the follovnng attach- 
ments, will fill the requirements: 

Triple nose piece. 10 x and 5 x Oculars. 

Wide aperture stage. 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives. 

Quick screw condenser (Abbe). 1.9mm. 1.25 N.A. Oil Immersion 

Lens. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate 
to the year ending June 5, 1927, only. The right is reserved 
to make changes in the curriculum, the requirements for grad- 
uation, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever the 
Facultv deem it exoedient. 



70 RULES AND FEES 



FEES. 



Matriculation fee (paid once) , $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland _ 250.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 350.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) , _ 20.00 

Special and re-examination fee _ 5.00 

Graduation fee _ _... _._ 10.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution in any class for the session beginning September 
27, 1S26. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to 
register at the Registrar's office. The last date of registra- 
tion is October 4, 1926. 

Matriculation, laboratory and tuition fees for the first sem- 
ester shall be paid at the time of registration, and for the sec- 
ond semester on or before February 6th, 1927. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar 
the student from attendance on classes and other privileges 
of the University. 

Students who fail to pay the tuition and other fees, on or 
before the last day of registration, for each term or semester, 
as stated in the catalogue, will be required to pay as an addi- 
tion to the fees required the sum of Five ($5.00) Dollars and 
if the payment so required shall not be paid before twenty 
(20) days from the beginning of said term or semester, the 
student's name shall be stricken from the rolls. 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident stu- 
dents, if at the time of their registration, their parents or 
guardians have been residents of this state for at least one 
year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at 
the time of their first registration they have been residents of 
this state for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the 
time of his first registration in the University and may not 
thereafter be changed by him unless his parents or guardians 
move tu and become legal residents of this State. 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 71 



PmZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 



FACULTY PRIZE. 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the 
highest average during the four years of his course. Certifi- 
cates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates standing 
next highest. 

DR, JOSE L. HIRSH MEMORIAL PRIZE. 

A prize of $50.00 is given each year by Mrs. David Myers 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsh, formerly Pi'ofessor 
of Pathology in this School, to the student in the third year 
who has done the most satisfactory work in Pathology during 
his second and third yeai-s. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an 
alumnus of this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University each year upon nomination by the Medical 
Council, "to a medical student of the University of Maryland, 
who, in the judgment of said Faculty, is of good character and 
in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student who has successfully completed one year's work in 
this school, and no student may hold such scholarehip for more 
than two years. 



72 SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 
(Value, $125.00 each) 

Tv/0 scholarships were established from a bequest to tlie 
School of Medicine bj^ the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., 
an alumnus of the University. 

These scholarships are av,'arded annually by the Trustees 
of the Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by 
the Medical Council to students who have meritoriously com- 
pleted the work of at least the first year of the course in medi- 
cine, and who present to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of 
a good moral character and of inability to continue the course 
without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Wins- 
low, M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Tixistees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical (Coun- 
cil, to '*a needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore 
Class of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all 
his work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

*'He must be a person of good character and must satisfy 
the Medical Council that he is woii-hy of and in need of assist- 
ance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship. 

(Value, $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by l/lxs. F:ay Mintz Kar- 
linsky as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlin- 
sky, an alumnus of this University. 

The scholarship is awarded to a second year student v/ho at 
the end of the first year passes the best examination in Anato- 
my, Histology, Embryology and Bacteriology. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 73 

The University Scholarships. 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University. One to a' 
student of the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the 
President, to be held for only one year; the other, which en- 
titles the holder to exemption from payment of the tuition fee 
of the year, is awarded annually by the Medical Council to a 
student of the Senior Class who presents to the Medical Coun- 
cil satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character 
and is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the 
course. 

Frederica Gehrmann S<rhoIarship, 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late 
Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption 
from payment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to 
a third year student w^ho at the end of the second year passes 
the best practical examination in Anatomy, Physiology, Bio- 
logical Chemistry, Pharmacology, Pathology, Im.munology and 
Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships. 

(Valuation, $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from 
the income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence 
Warfield. 

j Terms and Conditions : These scholarships will be available 
i to students of any of the classes of the course in medicine, 
I Preference is given to students from the counties of the State 
I of Maryland which the Medical Council may from time to time 
determine to be most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, after 

graduation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the 

practice of medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to 

I v/hich the student is accredited or in a county selected by the 

I Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with 

;| the condition requiring him to practice in the county to which 

he is accredited by the council, the m.oney advanced by the 



74 SCHOLARSHIPS— APPOINTMENTS 

Reg-ents shall be refunded. A bond in the amount of $1,200, 
the expense of which is borne by the Fund, must be filed by 
the student accepting one of these scholarships for faithful 
performance of the conditions imposed. 

Isirael ajid Cecilia E. Cohen Scholarship. 

(Value, $250.00) 

Tills schola.rship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen 
in memory of her parents, Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen. Terms 
and conditions: 

This scholarship will be available to students of any one of 
the classes of the course in Medicine; preference is given to 
students of the counties of the State of Maryland which the 
Medical Council may from time to time determine to be most 
in need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving one of 
these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interne- 
ship, agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of 
ty/o years in the county to which the student is accredited, or 
in a county selected by the Council. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual ap- 
pointments are jnade from am.ong the graduates of the school : 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons. Two Resident Obstetricians. 

Two Resident Physicians. Thirteen Junior Residents on a 

One Resident Gynecologist. Rotating Service. 

A number of students are appointed each j^ear, at the close 
of the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital 

for the summ.er months. 

TO THE MEPXY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician. One Resident Gynecologist. 

One Assistant Resident Physician. One Resident Obstetrician. 

Chief Resident Surgeon. Eight Junior Residents on a 
Five Assistant Resident Surgeons. Rotating Service. 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 75. 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in 
Baltimore as in any large city in the United States. The fol- 
lowing estimates of a student's personal expenses for the aca- 
demic year of eight months have been prepared by students, 
and are based upon actual experience. 

Items Low 

Books $27 

College Incidental? 20 

Board, eight months 200 

Room rent 64 

Clothing and laundry 50 

All other expenses 25 

Total $386 $529 $695 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in 
the city by going direct to the School of Medicine on the Uni- 
versity grounds, N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, 
where the Superintendent of Buildings, who may be found at 
his office on the premises, will furnish them Vvath a list of com- 
fortable and convenient boarding houses suitable to their 
means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks 

and drafts for students. 

I ■ For further information, apply to 

i J. M. H. PwOWLAND, M. D., Dean, 

I Lombard and Greene Streets. 



Average 


Liberal 


48 


75 


20 


20 


250 


275 


80 


100 


80 


150 


50 


75 



76 



MATRICULATES 1925-26 



IVIATKICULATES, UNiVERSITi^ OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 1925-26. 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 



Anker, Harry „ Ohio 

Askin, John A.. A.B Maryland 

Ballard, Margaret Bymside.— West Virginia 

Beachlery, Jack Henson Maryland 

Bloxzgh, Homer Chester, B.S Pennsylvania 

Bronstein, Irving New York 

Calvin, Warren Elwood, B.S Maryland 

D'Angelo. Antonio Francesco.. ..Rhode Island 

DeVincentis, Henry New Jersey 

Diamond, H. Elias, B.S New York 

DiPaula. Frank Rosario, A.B Maryland 

Dyer, Newman Houghton, B.S.. 

West Virginia 

Ea.net, Paul _ Maryland 

Edmonds, Charles William „ Maryland 

Elliott, Julian Carr. A.B -..Virginia 

England. Welch, B.S West Virginia 

*Finkelstein, Abraham Harry New York 

Freedman, Herman _ JNew Jersey 

Freedman, Max. New Jersey 

Freuder. Arthur Nathan New York 

Geraghty, Franci-s Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Gerber, Isadore Earle, A.B Maryland 

Gordon, Abel, A.B New Jersey 

Goiham, Herbert Jenkins... .North Carolina 

Graham. John Wirt, A.B Maryland 

Helfond, David Mathew, B.S .New York 

Hendrix, Nevins Byford, A.M i>Iaryland 

Hibbitts. John Thomas. Maryland 

Hyman, Calvin, A.B Maryland 

Jensen. Jacob Roed, B.S Denmark 

Johnson, Philip, B.S West Virginia 

Jolson, Meyer Stanley, A.B Maryland 

Knapp, Alphonse Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Krosnoff, John Alexander, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Lavy, Louis Theodore Maiyland 

Leake, Everette Majjette^.-Nurtli Carolina 
Levin, H. Edmund, B.S Mary-land 



Levin, Isadore Leonard, A.B Ohio 

Levin, Joseph New Jersey 

Loftin. William Frank English, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Lumpkin, Lloyd Uber, B.S Maryland 

Lusby, Frank Farrier, A.B Maryland 

Manginelli, Emanuel Alfred. ^New York 

Merkel, Waiter Clarence, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Miller, Harry G „ „ New York 

Moriconi, Albert Francia New Jersey 

Polsue, William Clewell West Virginia 

Rattenni, Arthur Rhode Island 

Rosenberg, Albert Abraham.. ..Pennsylvania 

Rosenfeld, Max Harry, A.B Maryland 

Rothberg, Abraham S., B.S New York 

Sashin, David New York 

Sax, Benjamin J New York 

Schenker. Paul Maryland 

Schmukler, Jacob New Jersey 

Schneider, David, A.B Maryland 

Schuman, William, A.B Maryland 

Schwartz, Ralph Alfred. New Jersey 

Scullion, Arthur Anthony, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Sherman, Elizabeth Bowman. A.B., 

Virgin ii 

Spano, Frank New Jersey 

Tayntor, Lewis Olds, Ph. C Pennsylvania 

Teagarden. Ersie Van, B.S West Virginia 

Teitelbaum, Maurice L New York 

Tobias, Herbert Ramsay Maryland 

Trubek, Max, A.B „.-New Jersey 

Weinstein, Samuel New Jersey 

Weiss, Loui.s Leo New York 

We.sel«y, Louis Jeroma New York 

Whicker, Guy Lorraine, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Wolfe. Samuel Benjamin. Maryland 



*Did not eocQplete year. 



MATRICULATES 1925-26 



77 



THIRD YEAR CLASS, 1925-26. 



Afli.ima, Joseph Matthew Ojnnecticxxt 

Aptaker, Albert Jack New York 

Armacost, Joshua Harper Maryland 

Ball, Claude Russell, B.S West Virginia 

Bankhead, John Marion, B.S., 

South Carolina 

Bamett, Edwin Dwight, A.B California 

Basil, George Chester, Ph.G Maryland 

Belsky, Hyman New York 

Benesunes, Joseph George, A.B Maryland 

Bialostosky. Julius, B.S New York 

Birnbaum, Joseph Osias New York 

Cadden, John Francis, Jr West Virginia 

Carey, Thomas Nelson Maryland 

Chase, William Wiley, A.B Mairland 

Clemson. Earle Princeton Maryland 

Cohen, Bernai-d J., Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Morris Daniel New York 

Condry, Raphael Joseph, B.S., 

West Vir.einia 
Covington, Elijah Eugene.... North Cyrolina 

Davis, Henry Vincent MarjMand 

Donchi, Sol Marvin, B.S New Jersey 

Eliawn. Hai-old William West Virginia 

Feldman, Jacob New York 

Fidler, Kemp Ardvem. B.S West Virginia 

Friedman, Meyer Henr>- New Jersey- 
Gamer. Wade Hampton. B.S Alaba.ma 

Cellar, Abraham, B.S New York 

Gill, Charles Ethvai-d Delaware 

Gillis, Francis Wlnfred —..Maryland 

Ginsberg, Heni-y Maryland 

Click. Bernaj'd New Jersey 

Goldberg, Isidore New Jersey 

Goldstein. Milton Joseph New York 

Heisley, Rowland S _ -...Maryland 

Hewitt, John Frank, A.B Marj'Iand 

Hoke, Dwight Moody. B.S West Virginia 

Hitmmel, Ira Lee Cotti-ell New Jersey 

Igiitzin, Maurice Abraham New York 

Johnson, Jesse Raymond, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Kahan, Philip J New York 

Karns, Clyde Filmore, B.S Maryland 

Kayser, Fayne Albert, B.S West Virginia 

Klawajis, Maurice Francis Maryland 

Kutner, Charles— New Jersey 



Lassman, Samuel, B.S New York 

Lazow, Sol M New York 

Lenson, Byruth King (Mrs.) Maryland 

Lej^ko, Julius Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lilly, Goff Piatt West Virginia 

Mattikow. Bernard, B.S New York 

Milhoan, Asa Wade, B.S West Virginia 

Misenheimer, Ed Alexander.. North Carol iiia 
Moran, John Edward, Ph.G....Massachusetts 

Morri.s, Francis Kailer, A.B Maryland 

Nus&baum, Samuel New Y'ork 

P^'ake. Clarence William Kentucky 

Phillips, John Roberts, A.B Maryland 

Re if Schneider, Herbert E.. A.B Maryland 

Saffell, James Glen _ Maryland 

Schnieitr, Stirnue! Benjamin Connecticut 

Schwt^del, John Bernard- Maryland 

Sparta, Anthony.„ PennsylvaJ.ia 

Staton, Hilliard Vincent Nox-th Carolina 

Stonesifer, Charles Hiram, A.B Mai-yiand 

Strayer, Helen C, A.B Maryland 

Swank. James Levy, B.S Pennsylvania 

Swartz welder. Wallace Ray.. ..Pennsylvania 

TaJbot, Henry Pierce _...Aiabamua 

Tayloe, Gordon Bennett, A.B., 

North Carolina 

TeagTie, Francis Bailey Virginia 

Thompson, Thomas Payne, A.B Maryland 

Tollin, Louis New Jersey 

Totterdale, William Grainger, A.B., 

Maniand 
Tununinello, Salvatcre Anthony.. ..Maryland 

Upton, Hiram Eugene. B.S Vermont 

Voigt, Hei-man Albert, Ph.G Maryland 

Von Schulz, Augustine Paul Maryland 

Wack. Frederic Van Deursen, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Wae.sche, Fretlerick Seton, A.B Maryland 

Whittington, Claude Thomas. 

North Cai-olina 
Williams, Palmer Francis C, B.S., 

Maryland 

Wilner, Joseph Walter New York 

♦Wohlreich, Joseph Jacob New Jersey 

Wollak, Theodore Maryland 

Yarbrough, Oscar D Alabama 

Zinn, Ralph Howajd, B.S Wef?t Virginia 



*I)id not con-^plete year. 



78 



MATRICULATES 1925-26 
SECOND- YEAR CLASS, 1925-26. 



Aiau, Chadwick Kanekoa. T. H. 

Baer, Adolph New York 

Bedri, Maroel Rechtman Palestine 

Berber, William Adolph, B.S Nerw Jersey 

Bernaixi, Robert New York 

Blecherman, Ii-ving Ezra New York 

Bonelli, Nicholas William. New Jersey 

Brager, Sim.on Maryland 

Chor, Hemian, A.B Maryland 

Christian. William Pennsylvania 

Dailey, Cornelius Michael Pennsylvania 

Duckwall. Frederick Mooman..West Virginia 

Friedman, Bernard New York 

GafFney, Charles Bernard Connecticut 

Gaskins, Theodore Grady North Cai'olina 

Gelber, Jacob Saul Rhode Island 

*GittlemaJi, Isaac F Maryland 

Goldberg, Victor, Ph.G MaiTiand 

Goodman, Jerome Edward, Ph.G.. .Maryland 

Grollnoan, Aaron Isaac, B.S Maryland 

*Guiglia, Sascha Facchetti New York 

Gulck, George Krohn, B.S Denmark 

Gundi-y, Lewis Perkins, A.B Maryland 

Hankin, Samuel Jacob Marjiand 

Herold, Lewis Jacob. Ph.G New York 

Johnson, Walter Brenaman, A.B. ..Maryland 

Jones, Heni-y Alvan, Ph.G Maryland 

Kaminsky, Philip New York 

Kaufman, Israel, B.S New York 

Kohn. Theooore. B.S South Carolina 

Lampert. Hyman New York 

Lamstein, Jacob Irving, B.S New York 

Laukaitis, Joseph George Maryland 

Lerner, Monns New York 

Levinskj', Maurice Connecticut 

Levinson, Louis Jack. New York 

Levy, Walter Howard. New York 

Limbach, Earl Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Little, Luther Emmanuel, Ph.G Maryland 

Littman, Ii-ving I Maryland 

Lyon, Isadore Bernard, A.B. Mar>iand 

Mace. John. Jr.. B.S Maryland 

Maddi. Vincent Michael, A.B New York 

Maged, Abraham John. A.B New York 

Matsumura, Junichi T. H. 

McCeney, Robert Sadler. A.B Maryland 

McFaul, William Neal, Jr., A.B Maryland 

McGowan, Joseph Francis Pennsylvania 

McKee, Albert Vincent Pennsylvania 



Meister, Aaron New York 

Merksamer, David, A.B New York 

Merlino, Frank Anthony New Jersey 

Messina, Vincent Michael Maryland 

Mostwill, Ralph New Jersey 

Neuman, Finley Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Parker, Joseph Wiley North Carolina 

Pegiies, William Leak, A.B., 

South Carolina 
Piacentine, Pasquale Anthony....New York 

Pileggi, Peter New Jersey 

Posti-el, Lewis Louis New York 

Rascoff, Henry New York 

Rich, Benjamin Sunderland, A.B. ...Maryland 

Roetling, Carl Paul Maryland 

Rosen, Marks Julius New York 

Rubinstein, Hyman Solomon, Ph.G., 

Maryland 

Rutter, Joseph Howard Florida 

Saffron, Morris Harold, A.B New Jersey 

Sardo, Samuel Philip Pennsylvania 

Silver, Abraham Alfred Connecticut 

Singer, Jack Jerom* - Maryland 

Smith, Lazai-us. New York 

Smoot. Aubrey Cannon, A.B Maryland 

Smoot. Merrill Clayville, B.S Maryland 

Stacy, Theodore Edwin, Jr., Ph.G., 

Pennsylvania 

Tannenbaum, Morris, B.S New York 

Taylor, Charles Vivian, A.B Maryland 

Tenner, David, Ph.G Maryland 

Tkach, Nathan Hersh New York 

Vamey. William Henry Maryland 

Vernaglia. Anthony Paul Joseph.. New York 

Vogel, S. Zachary New York 

Volenick, Leo Joseph New York 

Walter, Frank Pierce Maryland 

Ward, Hugh Walter, A.B Maryland 

Warner, Carroll Gardner, A.B Maryland 

Weintraub, Fied Siegfried, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Weiss, Aaron New York 

Weisenfeld, Nathan. B.S Connecticut 

Wilkerson. Albert Russell, Ph.G.-Maryland 

Wolf. Frederick Samuel Maryland 

Wurzel, Milton New Jersey 

Zimmerman, Frederick Thomas, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 



*Did not complete year. 



MATRICULATES 1925-26 
FIRST YEAR CLASS, 1925-26. 



79 



Abramowitz, Max, B.S New York 

Ackenman, Jacob Harold JNew York 

Ajmelli, Junius Bruno New York 

AJbaugh, Guy Clinton Penns>-lvania 

ALessi, Silvio A.. Ph. G Mai-yland 

Anderson. Walter Anders. Maryland 

*Ames, Lawrence Gabriel Pennsylvania 

Bardfeld. Benjamin. _...New Jersey 

Barland, Samuel. Jr., B.S New York 

Birely, Morris Franklin, A.B Mai-yland 

Bongiorno, Henry Domenic, Ph.G., 

New Jersey 

Botsch, Bemai-d. Ohio 

Bounds, James Albert _ Maryland 

Bowen, James Poore, B.S South Carolina 

Brauer, Selig Leo New Jersey 

*Buchness, Joseph Vincent Maryland 

Buckler, Milburn Alexander, A.B.. 

Maryland 

Calas, Andres Eladio. Cuba 

Chambers, Earl LeRoy Maryland 

Chapman, William Hardee Maryland 

Ciccone, Arnold William. Rhode Island 

Cohen, Herman New Jersey 

Cohen, Jacob Harry, A.B Maryland 

Cohen, Paul, A.B Maryland 

*Cohen, Samuel „ Pennsylvania 

Connell, Raphael Joseph, B.S. ..Pennsylvania 

Coppola, Matthew Joseph, B.S New York 

Corsello, Joseph Nicholas New York 

Dailey, William Paul Pennsylvania 

DeBarbieri, Fred Louis, A.B Pennsylvania 

Draper, William Bateman Maryland 

Farbman, Meyer David, B.S New York 

Fargo, W^illiam Russell, A.B Maryland 

Fatt, Henry Charles, B.S New Jersey 

Feingold, Charles. New York 

Feit, Emanuel, B.S New York 

Fifer, Jesse Showalter, A.B Delaware 

Fiocco, "Vincent James, B.S New York 

♦Freed, Israel, Ph.G Maryland 

Garber, Jacob New York 

Giooolano, Ralph Gabriel New York 

Givner, David, A.B Maryland 

Gouldman, Edwin Fester, B.S Virginia 

*Greenberg, Abram Morton, Ph.G., 

Maryland 

Haney, John James. New Jersey 

Harris, Joseph William Utah 

♦Hayes, Allen Milliken Maine 

Heck, Leroy S., B.S _ Maryland 

Hess, Warren Albert Pennsylvania 

Horowitz, Morris, A.B -...Massachusetts 

Husted, Samuel Harley New Jersey 

Jackson. Murray Elliot. _ New York 

Jacobs, Abraham New York 



♦Jacobs, Orville Edward. Maryland 

♦Jacobson, John Joseph New Jersey 

♦Jennings, Robert Henry. A.B., 

South Carolina 

Kelly, Clyde Ernest, A.B Pennsylvania 

*Kemp, Alexander Brown Maryland 

Kerrigan, Timothy Robert. Pennsylvania 

Kirschner, Abe Edward, A.B New York 

Knight, Walter Philip Pennsylvania 

Leonard, Leo Fi-ank, A.B Pennsylvania 

Levi, Ernest, Ph.G Maryland 

♦Liner, Samuel Joseph North Cai-olina 

*Lowry, James Patrick Pennsylvania 

Lukesh, Stephen Michael Pennsylvania 

Lynn, Cy Keliie North Carolina 

Lynn, Irving, B.S New Jersey 

Lynn. John Galloway, 3rd Mai-yland 

Magovern, Thomas Francis New Jersey 

McAndrew, Joseph Theodore.West Virginia 

McGregor, Alpine Watson Utah 

Mednick, Benjamin William -New York 

Meranski. Israel, B.S Connecticut 

Morgan, Isaac J Pennsylvania 

Moseley, Edgar Tilton, A.B Maryland 

Murphy, John Edward Pennsylvania 

Nagle, Carl Rotan Mai-yland 

♦Xathanson, Nathan Pennsj'lvania 

Neidstadt, Isidore Irving. A.B Maryland 

Newman, Saul Charles, B.S Connecticut 

Nickman, Emanuel Harrison New Jersey 

O'Dea, John Francis, A.B New York 

O'Donohue, Valentine Alphonsus..New York 

Osborn, Adam Downey New Jersey 

Overton, Louis Marvin, A.B. ..North Carolina 

Penchansky, Samuel Joseph New Jersey 

*Peti'uzzi, Joseph Anthony New York 

Porterfield, Maurice Coleman Maryland 

Powell, Joseph Lawrence Pennsylvania 

Prager, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Quinn, Thomas Francis Pennsylvania 

*Raffel, Leon Maryland 

*Rapp, Edgar Carl, B.S Connecticut 

Reeder, Paul Arlington, B.S. ..West Virginia 

Reilly, John Vincent _...New Jersey 

Roberts, Eldred Maryland 

Safer, Jake Victor Florida 

Safford, Henry Towne, Jr Texas 

Schreiber, Morris Bernard..- New York 

Schwartzbach, Saul, A.B New York 

Seibel, Jack. New York 

Sedja, Martin Benjamin Pennsylvania 

Sekerak, Raymond Andrew Connecticut 

Serra, Lawrence Marco, Ph.G Maryland 

Sikorsky, Albert Edward, A.B Mar>-land 

Silver, Mabel Irene, B.S Maryland 

Snyder, Nathan, Ph.G Maryland 



80 MATRICULATES 1925-26 

FIRST YEAR CLASS, 1925-26— (Continued) 

Soifer, Albert Alexander. Maryland Stone, Jesse Edwin, A.B Maryland 

Solomon, Milton, B.S New York Sullivan, William Joseph Rhode Island 

Speicher, Wilbur Glenn Maryland Ullrich, Henry Franz.— Maryland 

Spencer, Ernest Maryland Vann, Homer King Florida 

Spurrier, Oliver Walter, A.B Maryland Wallack. Charles Albert, B.S New Jersey 

Staton, Leon Raphael, A.B...North Carolina *Werner. Aaron Seth „ New York 

Stevenson, Charles Calvert Utah Yudkoff, William New Jersey 

*Did not complete year. 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING 
THE UNIVERSITY OF Mi\RYLAND 

SESSION OF 1925-1926. 

College of Agriculture _ _ _ _ 208 

(Regular _ _ 129 

(Short Courses _ _ 79 

College of Arts and Sciences.. „ _ _ _ _ _ _ „ 472 

(Regular _ _ „ 456 

(Extension _ _ .16 

School of Business Administration _ 341 

(Regular _ _ _ _ _ . 1-52 

(Extension _____ 189 

School of Dentistry _ . _ _ 488 

College of Education _ 231 

(Regular _ . 118 

(Extension _ _ _ - 113 

College of Engineering _ _ _ . _ 405 

(Regular _ . _ _ _ _ 212 

(Extension _ _ _ . .193 

Graduate School _ _ _ _ 113 

College of Home Economics.. ______ _ 34 

School of Law _ _ _ _ __ _ _ 596 

School of Medicine 372 

School of Nursing _ ._ _____ _ 76 

School of Pharmacy _ _ _ . 234 

Summer School, 1925, College Park 454 

Summer School, 1925, School of Business Administration _...._ 86 

Total _ - - -.- 4,060 

Duplications _ - - 101 

Net Total _ _ 3,959 



GRADUATES 1926 



81 



GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 

OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, JUNE 5, 1926. 



Anker, Harry Ohio 

Askin, John A., A.B Maryland 

Ballard, Margraret Byrnsida—West Virginia 

Beachley, Jack Henson Maryland 

Blough, Homer Chester, B.S... Pennsylvania 

Bronstein, Ii-\'ing New York 

Calvin, Warren Elwood, B.S Maryland 

D'Angrelo, Antonio Francesco.... Rhode Island 

DeVincentis, Henry New Jersey 

Diamond, H. Elias, B.S J^ew York 

DiPaula, Frank Rosario, A.B Maryland 

Dyer, Newman Houghton, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Eanet, Paul Maryland 

Edmonds, Charles William Maryland 

Elliott, Julian Carr. A.B Virginia 

England, Welch, B.S^ West Virginia 

Freedman, Heiinan New Jersey 

Freedman, Max New Jersey 

Freuder, Arthur Nathan New York 

Geraghty, Francis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Gerber, Isadore Earle, A.B Maryland 

Gordon, Abel, A.B New Jersey 

Gorham, Herbert Jenkins....North Carolina 

Graham, John Wirt, A.B Maryland 

Helfond, David Mathew, B.S New York 

Hendrix, Nevins Byford, A.M Maryland 

Hibbitts, John Thomas Maryland 

Hj-man, Calvin, A.B Maryland 

Jensen, Jacob Roed, B.S Denmark 

Johnson, Philip. B.S _...West Virginia 

Jolson, Meyer Stanley, A.B Maryland 

i Knapp, Alphonse Joseph, A.B Maryland 

rKrosnoff, John Alexander, B.S., 

I Pennsylvania 

I Lavy, Louis Theodore —.Maryland 

^ Leake, Everette Majjette... .North Carolina 
(Levin, H. Edmund, B.S -...Maryland 



Levin, Isadore Leonard, A.B Ohio 

Levin, Joseph _ New Jersey 

Loftin, William Frank English. A.B., 

North Carolina 

Lumpkin, Lloyd Uber, B.S Maryland 

Lusby, Frank Farrier, A.B Maryland 

Manginelli, Emanuel Alfred New York 

Merkel, Walter Clarence, A.B.. 

Pennsylvania 

Miller. Harry G New York 

Moriconi, Albert Francis. New Jersey 

Polsue, William Clewell West Virginia 

Rattenni. Arthur Rhode Island 

Rosenberg, Albert Abraham....Pennsylvania 

Rosenfeld, Max Harry, A.B Maryland 

Rothberg, Abraham S., B.S New York 

Sashin, David. New York 

Sax, Benjamin J New York 

Schenker, Paul Maryland 

Schmukler, Jacob New Jersey 

Schneider, David, A.B Maryland 

Schuman, William, A.B Maryland 

Schwartz, Ralph Alfred. New Jersey 

Scullion, Arthur Anthony. B.S... New Jersey 
Sherman, Elizabeth Bowman, A.B.. 

Virginia 

Spano, Frank ; New Jersey 

Tayntor, Lewis Olds, Ph.C Pennsylvania 

Teagarden, Ersie Van, B.S West Virginia 

Teitelbaum, Maurice L New York 

Tobias, Herbert Ramsay Maryland 

Trubek, Max, A.B New Jersey 

Weinstein, Samuel New Jersey 

Weiss, Louis Leo New York 

Weseley, Louis Jerome New York 

Whicker, Guy Lorraine, A.B., 

North Caroliaia 
Wolfe, Samuel Benjamin Maryland 



Prizemen. 

University Prize — Gold Medal — Elizabeth Bowman Sherman, A.B. 

Certificates of Honor. 
Samuel B. Wolfe Calvin Hyman, A.B. 



Frank Farrier Lusby, A.B. 

Irving Bronstein 



John A. Askin, A.B. 



In the third year, the Dr. Jose L. Hirsh Memorial Prize of $50.00 was 
awarded to Charles E. Gill for the best work in Pathology during the 
second and third years. 



82 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

President 
C. W. Maxson, M.D. 

First Vice-President 
J. Mason Hundley, Sr-, M.D. 

Second Vice-President 
Frank Hines, M.D. 

Thvrd Vice-President 
A. W. Gracie, M.D. 

Secretary 
Howard M. Bubert, M.D. 

Assistant Secretary 
Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Treasurer 
Herbert L. Blake, M.D. 

Hospital Committee 

G. M. Linthicum, M.D. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D. 

Alumni Council 
Charles Bagley, Jr., M.D. 

Necrologist 
W. J. Todd, M.D. 

Executive Committee 
Robert L. Mitchell, M.D. 
W. S. Love, M.D. C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Edgar Friedenwald, M.D. Henry F. Hill, M.D. 

Advisoin.! Committee 
F. Keating, M.D. 
S. G. Davis, M.D. Everard Briscoe, M.D. 

A. E. Goldstein, M.D. Paul Brown, M.D. 



ENDOWMENT FUND 83 

ENIX)WMENT FUND. 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund : 

H.VKRY Adler, M.D. John B. Thomas, Ph.G~ 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 

Stuart Janney Robertson Griswold 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incor]X)rated by act of the Legislature of t[ie 
State, its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University of Maryland," and is independent and 
self-perpetuating. Its powers are limited to the expenditure 
of the interest derived from the fundy which is to be applied 
in the discretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. 
Contributions, donations and bequests are solicited from 
Alumni and friends. They may be made to the general or 
University Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other depart- 
ment of the University. If intended for the School of Medi- 
cine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some 
special object, as building, research, library, pathology, hos- 
pital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, 
prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly 
regarded. Attention is invited to the ''Charles Frick Research 
Fund," already established in memory of that distinguished 
investigator. Checks should be made payable to J. M. H. Row- 
land, Treas., Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 

To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Mary- 
land, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Mai-yland, 

for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic _ _ _ _ _ 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws 

of the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic _ 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 



84 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING. 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 
Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Frances M. Branley, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 
IsoBEL Zimmerman, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Louise L. Savage, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supei-visor of Wards 
To be appointed. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and Supervisor of 

Operation Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 
Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 
Grace Pearson, R.N. 

Lillie Hoke - - - - - - Supervisor 

Lena Townshend, R.N Supervisor, Nurses Home 

Jane Moffatt, R.N - - -....- Supervisor, Dispensary 

Mabel Trevilian, R.N _ Head Nurse, Obstetrical Ward 

Alice M. Bennett, R.N _.... ,.._ Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N. _.... „ Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Myrtle E. Nock _ „...._ Head Nurse, Women's Ward 

Helen Morgart, R.N. Head Nurse, Men's Medical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N. „ ...._ Head Nurse, Men's Surgical Ward 

Ida Nagel, R.N _ - _ _ Assistant in Operating Room 

Viola May Cady, R.N Head Nurse, Children's Ward 

Jane Scott, R.N _.... Head Nurse, Accident Room 

Miriam Coates, R.N — — Head Nurse, Men's Surgical Ward 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 85 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy 
C. L. Davis, M.D. 

Physiology 
A. H. Ryan, M.D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Chemistry 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 

Materia Medica 
W. H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Medicine 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. J. S. Hogan, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. V. L, Elliott, M.D. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D. 

Pediatrics 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Psychiatry 
R. McClury Chapman, M.D. 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Ophthalmology 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Otology 
J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Surgery 
Joseph L. Holland, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology 
E. A. LooPER, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D. 



86 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Social Service 
Special Lecturers 

STUDENTS ENROLLED, 1925-1926 

Seniors .._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 19 

Intermediates . _ . _ _ . _ 17 

Juniors and Preparatory . _ _ . _ . . . . 35 

Total _ _ _ 71 

GENERAL STATEMENT. 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was estab- 
lished in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the Univer- 
sity Hospital, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being 
morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing 
about 250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thor- 
ough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing 
including experience in the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in 
its opportunity for varied experience and in its thorough cur- 
riculum taught by best qualified instructors and members of 
the Medical Staff of the University. 

Admission — Requirements : In order to become a candidate 
for admission to the Training School, application must be made 
in person or by letter, to the Superintendent of Nurses. An 
application by letter should be accompanied by a statement 
from a clergyman testifying to good moral character and from 
a physician certifying to sound health and unimpaired facul- 
ties. No person will be considered who is not in a good phy- 
sical condition between the ages of 18 and 35. She must also 
show that she has a High School education or its equivalent. 
This is the minimum requirement, as women of superior edu- 
cation and culture are given preference provided they meet the 
requirements in other particulars. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 87 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety 
of dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of proba- 
tion, is left to the decision of the Superintendent of Nurses. 
Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neg- 
lect of duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the Super- 
intendent of Nurses, with the approval of the President of the 
University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February, June and Sep- 
tember. 

Hours on Duty: During the probation term the students 
are on duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, 
Intermediate and Senior years, the students are on eight hour 
day duty, with six hours on Sunday and Holidays, and ten 
hour night duty. The night duty periods are approximately 
two months each, with one day at the termination of each 
term for rest and recreation. The period of night duty is ap- 
proximately five or six months during the three years. 

Sickness : A physician is in attendance each day, and when 
ill all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost 
through illness in excess of two weeks, during the three years 
must be made up. Should the authorities of the school decide 
that through the time lost the theoretical work as not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in that 
year, it will be necessary for her to continue her work with 
the next class. 

Vacations : Vacations are given between June and Septem- 
ber. A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the 
completion of the first year and four weeks at the completion 
of the second year. 

Expense: A student receives her board, lodging and a rea- 
sonable amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During 
her period of probation she provides her own uniforms made 
in accordance with the hospital regulations. After being ac- 
cepted as a student nurse she wears the uniform furnished 
by the hospital. The student is also provided with textbooks 
and in addition to this is paid five dollars ($5.00) a month. 
Her personal expenses during the course of instruction and 
training will depend entirely upon her individual habits and 
tastes. 



88 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION. 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

The Junior Year is divided into two periods. The first term 
is the preparatory period (4 months) and the second the 
junior term. 

In the preparatory term the student is given practical in- 
struction in: 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies. The cost 
of hospital materials, apparatus and surgical instru- 
ments. 
II. Household economics and the preparation of foods. 

III. The hospital out-patients department and dispensary. 

During this term the practical work is done under constant 
supervision, and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen 
rooms, laundry and store room. 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruc- 
tions divided into laboratorj^ and lecture periods is thirty hours 
and includes courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Dietetics, 
Materia Medica, Personal Hygiene, Drugs and Solutions, 
Household Economics, Short course in Ethics and Historj^ of 
Nursing. 

At the close of the first half of Junior Year the students 
are required to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral 
tests, and failure to do so will be sufficient reason to terminate 
the course at this point. 

SUBSEQUENT COURSE. 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary 
period, occupies two and three-fourths years, and students are 
not accepted for a shorter period. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly en- 
gaged in practical work under the immediate supervision and 
direction of the head nurses and instructors. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 89 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruc- 
tion in Massage, Bacteriology, General Surgeiy and Introduc- 
tory Medicine. Practical instruction is received in the male 
and female, medical, surgical and children's wards. 

INTERMEDIATE YEAR. 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes Pedi- 
atrics, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics, Gyne- 
cology and Orthopaedics. The practical work provides expe- 
rience in the nursing of obstetrical and gynecological patients, 
in the operating rooms and the out-patient department. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During this period the student receives short courses of lec- 
tures on subjects of special interest. This includes a consider- 
ation of the work of institutions of public and private chari- 
ties, of settlements, and various branches of professional work 
in nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administration work 
to those showing exceptional ability in the Senior Year. With 
these students conferences are held on administration and 
teaching problems. 

Examinations : At the end of the first half year, students 
are examined in Anatomy, Physiology, Materia Medica, Die- 
tetics and Hygiene. At the end of the first year in Surgery and 
Bacteriology. 

During the second year they are examined in Urinalysis, 
Massage, Gynecology, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, 
Obstetrics and Pediatrics. At the end of the third year the 
final examination in Nervous and Mental Diseases, Diseases of 
Special Senses, Venereal Diseases, Ethics and History of 
Nursing. 

Examinations — which are both written and oral — include 
practical tests, and the standing of the student is based upon 
the general character of work throughout the year, as well as 
the results of the examinations. Students must pass all sub- 
jects before entering upon the work of the following year. 



90 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Graduation: The diploma of the School Avill be awarded to 
those who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three 
years and have passed successfully the final examinations. 

Scholarships : One scholarship has been established by the 
Alumnae of the Training School. It entitles a nurse to six 
weeks course at Teachers College, New York. This scholar- 
ship is awarded at the close of the third year to the student 
whose work has been of the highest excellence, and who de- 
sires to pursue post-gi^aduate study and special w^ork. 

An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary 
Board to the student who at the completion of three yesus 
shows exceptional executive ability. 

graduates, 1926. 

Allen, NaomL ^ I>elaware Hershey, Esthei- Pennsylvania 

Bond, Mildred Maryland Hurlock, Edna Maryland 

Coates, Marian Maryland Mvmdy, Fannie. South Carolina 

Caples, Virginia Maryland Parks, Colgate Maryland 

Colbourne, Elizabeth Maryland Powell, Marion Maryland 

Diehl, Sara. Pennsylvania Sperber, Elsie Maryland 

Eller, Maybelle -...Maryland Sperber, TheocSora Maryland 

Ewell, Elizabeth Maryland Shoultz, Carol Indiana 

Fink, Margaret Maryland Soott, Elizabeth Maryland 

Glover, Rebekah Marj-land 

FIVE year PR0GRA3f. 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training the 
University offers a combined Academic and Nursing program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in 
Nursing. 

The first two j^ears of the course (or pre-hospital period), 
consisting of 70 semester hours, are spent in the College of 
Arts and Sciences of the University, during which period the 
student has an introduction to the general cultural subjects 
which are considered fundamental in any college training. At 
least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park in order that the student may have her share 
in the social and cultural activities of college life. The last 
three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore. 
In the fifth year of the combined program certain elective 
courses such as Public Health Nursing, Nursing Education, 
Practical Sociology and Educational Psychology are arranged. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 91 

TWO YII4R PROGRAM IN TEE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

Ffeshmen Year. 

Seme ster I Semester II 

English Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) - 3 3 

Foreign Languag-e _ - 4-3 4-3 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101) _ 4 4 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. Sci. 101) 3 3 

Elementary Foods (H. E. 101) 3 3 

Physical Education - - -.- ~ 1 1 

18 18 

Sophomore Year. 

English Literature or History _._ _..... _ 3 3 

Organic and Food Chemistry _ - 3 

Nutrition - - - — ~ 3 

General Economics (Econ. 105) 3 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. 101) 3 

Gen. Zoology (Zool, 101) - - - 4 

Public Speaking (P. S. 101-102) - 1 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 102) 2 2 

Electives , - - ~ 1 5 

17 17 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING. 

I 

I The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was organized and 

I incorporated under the laws of the State of Maiyland in 1899 

[ and has operated successfully^ for a quarter of a century. 

I The course of study is three j'ears, during which time the 

■ Superintendent of the School assigns each pupil for definite 

periods to the various wards and services. Such practical 

I training under skilled supei*\asors best applies the science and 

; most adequately teaches the art of nursing. The course of 

study is modified and revised year by year, always with the 

idea of improvement. In schools of nursing, as in all other 

professional schools, changes are necessary, for to stand still 

is to retrograde. Each year new subjects are introduced or 

old ones are taught in new and more attractive ways. The 

curriculum embraces a preliminary period of four months, a 

junior term of eight months, an intermediate term of twelve 

months and a serior term of twelve months. 



92 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Mercy Hospital being attached to the Medical School of the 
University of Maryland, its nurses enjoy the exceptional ad- 
vantage of systematic courses of lectures covering every de- 
partment of nursing. These lectures, given by professors who 
are masters of their subjects, are made to co-ordinate with 
the school curriculum, thus giving the student nurse a thor- 
ough knowledge of her profession. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applications for admission to the School of Nursing should 
be addressed to Superintendent of Nurses, Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Requirements : Highest moral standard, intelligence, health, 
high-school education. Social references and letters from pas- 
tors and phj^sicians are also required. 

The course comprises three years of theory and practice. 
After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School proper, 
receiving Ten Dollars per month; their education being con- 
sidered their compensation. Board, laundry, etc., furnished 
by the institution. 

Four weeks before admission, candidates should forward 
$35.00 and measurements for uniforms and aprons, which will 
be in readiness on their arrival. No orders will be considered 
until this amount is received. These uniforms are worn 
throughout entire course, thus obviating additional expense 
after the probationary term expires. All clothing should be 
distinctly marked with names, Style No. 28, which may be 
procured from Woven Name Tape Co., Winstead, Conn. On 
admission, $10.00 is deposited on account of books. 

Hours of duty: 7 A. M. to 7 P. M., with three hours off 
and one hour for meals, making an eight-hour system, one 
afternoon every week, and two weeks' vacation annually. 

If nurses desire to remain out after 9:30 P. M. permission 
must be secured from the Superintendent. Late permission 
until 11 :30 P. M. may be obtained once every two weeks, from 
June to September, and once a month from September to June. 
No visitors allowed except when off duty. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 



93 



The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any cause that 
may be deemed sufficient by the Superintendent of Nurses. 

Dentistry should be attended to prior to entrance. Candi- 
dates should come provided with watch with second hand, 
fountain pen, scissors and comfortable shoes with rubber heels 
not too high; plain underwear, soap, towels, three laundry 
bags, shoe case and napkin ring. 

Address baggage to Nurses' Home, Mercy Hospital, Pleasant 
and Calvert Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



GRADUATES OF 1926. 



ELIZABETH STOKES 
LOIS MAY 
ROBERTA ELUOT 
EDITH SCHLICKER 
MARY MARKER 
MERLE STRONG 
MARIE MILLER 
MATILDA WHITE 
MARY CALLAHAN 
HELEN SLAYBAUGH 
KATHERINE BRADY 
CATHERINE REN EH AN 
MILDRED GARDINER 
MIRIAM REITER 



ELEANOR BEHR 

ELIZABETH KLENOTIZ 

LORETTA KILMER 

KATHRYN AUSTIN 

ANNE A. ROGERS 

MARION KITTLE 

NAOMIA OSTENDORF 

MARY SNEERINGER 

ROMANIE HAGERMAN 

SR. M. STANISLAUS PARSONS 

SR. M. JOSEPH BYRNE 

MARGARET SHAW 

MILDRED DAVIS 

HELEOSf JENKINS 



! 



Vol. XII JULY, 1927 No. 1 

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




PART TWO 

CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 

SESSION 1927-1928 



PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR 

JANUARY, APRIL, JULY AND OCTOBER 

LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Postoffice at 
Baltimore, Maryland, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



INDEX 



Page 

Alumni Association 83 

Annual Hospital Appointments 75 

Board of Instruction 6 

Board of Regents 4 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medicine. 69 

Consolidation of Schools 12 

Curriculimi, Organization of 36 

Anatomy 37 

Histology 37 

Embryology 38 

Physiology 38 

Bacteriology and Immunology 39 

Biological Chemistry 40 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 41 

Pathology 42 

Medicine 44 

Clinical Pathology 47 

Gastro-Enterology 48 

Psychiatry 48 

Pediatrics 49 

Neurology 50 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 50 

Medical Jurisprudence 51 

Surgery 51 

Anaesthesia 54 

Dermatologry 55 

Orthopaedic Surgery 55 

Roentgenology and Radiotherapy 56 

Throat and Nose 57 

Genito-Urinary 57 

Colon and Rectum 58 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy 59 

Obstetrics 59 

Gynecology 60 

Ophthalmology and Otology 60 

History of Medicine 61 

Dispensary Reports : 
Mercy Hospital 29 

University Hospital 21 



Page 

Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 22 

University Hospital 15 

Dispensary Staffs : 

Mercy Hospital 27 

University Hospital 19 

Endowment Fund 84 

Expenses, Students' 76 

Fees 70 

Graduates 82 

General Summary of Students 81 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 31 

Mercy Hospital 22 

Baltimore City Hospitals 29 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

for the Insane 35 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylimi 34 

University Hospital 15 

Libraries 35 

Matriculates 77 

Medical Council 5 

Prizes 72 

Prizemen 82 

Requirements for Matriculation 66 

Rules 69 

Schedule 62 

Scholarships 72 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospital 30 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 31 

Mercy Hospital 23 

University Hospital 17 

Training Schools for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital 92 

University Hospital 85 

University Council 4 

University of Maryland, Organization of 3 



INDEX 



Page 

Alumni Association 83 

Annual Hospital Appointments 75 

Board of Instruction 6 

Board of Regents 4 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medicine. 69 

Consolidation of Schools 12 

Curriculum, Organization of 36 

Anatomy 37 

Histology 37 

Embryology 38 

Physiology 38 

Bacteriology and Immunology 39 

Biological Chemistry 40 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 41 

Pathology 42 

Medicine 44 

Clinical Pathology 47 

Gastro-Enterology 48 

Psychiatry 48 

Pediatrics 49 

Neurology 50 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 50 

Medical Jurisprudence 51 

Surgery 51 

Anaesthesia 54 

Dermatology 55 

Orthopaedic Surgery 55 

Roentgenology and Radiotherapy 56 

Throat and Nose 57 

Genito-Urinary 57 

Colon and Rectimi 58 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy 59 

Obstetrics 59 

Gynecology 60 

Ophthalmology and Otology 60 

History of Medicine 61 

Dispensary Reports : 
Mercy Hospital 29 

University Hospital 21 



Page 

Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 22 

University Hospital 15 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Mercy Hospital 27 

University Hospital 19 

Endowment Fund 84 

Expenses, Students' 76 

Fees 70 

Graduates 82 

General Summary of Students 81 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 31 

Mercy Hospital 22 

Baltimore City Hospitals 29 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

for the Insane 35 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 34 

University Hospital 15 

Libraries 35 

Matriculates 77 

Medical Council 5 

Prizes 72 

Prizemen 82 

Requirements for Matriculation 66 

Rules 69 

Schedule 62 

Scholarships 72 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospital 80 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 31 

Mercy Hospital 23 

University Hospital 17 

Training Schools for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital 92 

University Hospital 85 

University Council 4 

University of Maryland, Organization of 3 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore Medical College News, and the Jour- 
nal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 

VOL. XII JULY, 1927 No. 1 



annual announcement 

session 1927-1928 



i 



BALTIMORE SCHOOLS (PROFESSIONAL GROUP) 
CALENDAR, 1927-1928 
FIRST SEMESTER 
1927 

September 19 — Registration begins. 

September 26 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

October 3 — Last day to register without paying fine of $5.00. 

November 11 — Holiday (Armistice Day). 

November 23 — Thanksgiving recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

November 28 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

December 21 — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

1928 

January 3 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 16 — Registration begins for second semester. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 30 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 
February 4 — Last day to register without paying fine of $5.00. 
February 22 — Holiday (Washington's Birthday). 
April 5 — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 
April 10 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
June 2 — Commencement Day. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board 
of nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by 
the Senate for terms of nine years each. The general admin- 
istration of the University is vested in the President. The 
University Council is an advisory body, composed of the Pres- 
ident, the Assistant to the President, the Director of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, the Director of the Extension 
Service, and the Deans. The University Council acts upon all 
matters having relation to the University as a whole, or to co- 
operative work between the constituent groups. Each school 
has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and mem- 
bers of its Faculty ; each Faculty Council controls the internal 
affairs of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization : 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine. 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are 
located in Baltimore ; the others in College Park, Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman Term expires 1933 

Robert Grain, Esq Term expires 1933 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer Term expires 1932 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow Term expires 1931 

John E. Raine, Esq Term expires 1930 

G. G. Gelder, Esq Term expires 1929 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary Term expires 1927 

Henry Holzapel, Jr., Esq Term expires 1934 

E. Brooke Lee, Esq Term expires 1935 



Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., 

President and Executive Officer 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President 

H. G. Byrd, B.S Assistant to the President 

P. W. Zimmerman, M.S Dean of the Gollege of Agriculture 

A. N. Johnson, S.B Dean of the Gollege of Engineering 

Frederick E. Lee, Ph.D Dean of the Gollege of Arts and Sciences 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Phar.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Head of Department of Information 

H. F. GOTTERMAN, M.S Dean of the Gollege of Education 

M. Marie Mount, A.B.__Acting Dean of the Gollege of Home Economics 

G. 0. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Director of the Experiment Station 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.G.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., ScD. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A. B., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B., M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

A. H. RYAN, M.D. 



6 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., LL.D Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Chas. O'Donovan, A.m., M.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor Ophthalmology and Otology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D., Professor of Physiology. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 
and Colon. 
- J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

R. TUNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Jos. E. GiCHNER, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 
Therapeutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM. (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hy- 
giene and Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 7 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A. M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 
Roentgenology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of 
Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Nathan WinsLOW, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of 
Thoat and Nose. 

Frank S. Lynn M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

M. Randolph Kahn, Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Elliott Hutchins, Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. LoCHER, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Sur- 
gery. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Abraham Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

C. C. CONSER, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
» G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
H Medicine. 

H^ C. C. W. JUDD, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
^B^ Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
^^m 0. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
Hp William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
^ft Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 



8 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
W. F. ZiNN, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 
W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Edward Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
H. S. Sullivan, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
F. L. Jennings, Associate Professor of Surgery. 
C. L. JOSLIN, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Reed Rockwood, A.B., M.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 
R. G. WiLLSE, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 
W. I. Messick, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

F. A. Ries, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harris Goldman, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

C. A. Reipschneider, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

MiLFORD Levy, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 

M. J. Hanna, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

A. H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

A. E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Emile Duskes, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

H. M. BuBERT, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

John F. Traband, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

A. J. GiLLis, Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Robert B. Wright, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Clement R. Monroe, M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, A.B., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

John F. Lutz, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

H. M. Foster, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Wm. J. Todd, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wm. F. Geyer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

George A. Knipp, M.D., Instructor in Physiology and Pediatrics. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

William Michel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. L. SiNSKY, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 

C. F. Horine, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Pathology. 

Edward Novak, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. A. NovEY, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics and Pathology. 

A. A. SUSSMAN, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Pathology. 

F. T. Kyper, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. J. Erwln, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

ISADORE H. SlEGEL, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

N. J. Davidov, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. KOPPLEMAN, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

I. S. ZiNBERG, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. G. GlCHNER, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Joseph N. Zierler, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

M. G. TULL, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

ISADORE I. Levy, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Instructor in Surgery, Genito-Urinary Surgery 

and Pathology. 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Septima C. Smith, A.M., Sc.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
William A. Strauss, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Moses Gellman, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Arnold Lawson Jensen, B.Sc, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

DwiGHT MOHR, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. R. Geraghty, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Clyde N. Marvel, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

J. H. Collinson, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

I. 0. RiDGLEY, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. J. McGarrell, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy and Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

W. E. Cole, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

ISADOR A. SiEGEL, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

John A. O'Connor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

James Brown, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmuller, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
R. M. Henning, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 11 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Elizabeth B. Sherman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

L. J. MiLLAN, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

William Emrich, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. H. Woody, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Leo T. Brown, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

C. V. Hooper, Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Samuel Wolfe, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Samuel Glick, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics and Pathology. 

M. N. Putterman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Robert Hodes, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

James W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 

J. HuLLA, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 

Ruth Musser, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Vernon Norwood, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Henry Wasserman, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

K. B. Legge, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

T. B. Aycock, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

F. A. Sigrist, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 



I 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both insti- 
tutions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Bal- 
timore Medical College, the entire equipment of three large 
medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one 
of the oldest foundations for medical education in America, 
ranking fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of 
the United States. It was chartered in 1807, under the name 
of the College of Medicine of Maryland, and its first class was 
graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College was empowered by 
the Legislature to annex three other colleges or faculties, of 
Divinity, of Law, and of Arts and Sciences, and the four col- 
leges thus united were "constituted an University by the name 
and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of 
Medicine of the University of Maryland has always been a 
leading medical college, especially prominent in the South and 
widely known and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, erected in 1812, is the oldest structure in America 
devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries and the first medical college library in 
the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a 
compulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Den- 
tistry was first given (1837), and here were first installed 
independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases of Women and 
Children (1867), and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

12 



ORGANIZATION 13 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide' for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 
hospital, and in this hospital intramural residency for the 
senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore 
Medical College, an institution of 32 years' growth. By this 
association the facilities of the School of Medicine were en- 
larged in faculty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated 
under Legislative enactment in 1872, and established on Han- 
over Street in a building afterwards known as the Maternite, 
the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was 
affected with the Washington University School of Medicine, 
in existence since 1827, and the college was removed to its 
present location at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this ar- 
rangement medical control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy 
Hospital, was obtained, and on this foundation in 1899 the 
present admirable college building was erected. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES 

The Laboratories 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of 
buildings at Greene and Lombard Streets, and the building at 
Calvert and Saratoga Streets. The schedule is so adjusted 
that the laboratory periods are placed with a view of obviating 
unnecessary movement on the part of the classes. The build- 
ing known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard 
Streets, houses three departments. The Anatomical Labora- 
tory is placed upon the top floor, where skylights and an aux- 
iliary modern system of electric lighting gives adequate illumi- 
nation of the subjects. On this floor are the ofl^ice of the de- 
partment and the necessary preparation rooms. The Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is a 
large room for the general student laboratory, which is thor- 



14 ORGANIZATION 

oughly equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in 
addition contains many instruments of unique and original 
design. With office and stock-room adjoining, this laboratory 
is complete for student experimentation. On the first floor of 
Gray Laboratory is the Department of Physiology. In addition 
to the large student laboratory, which is constructed for sec- 
tions of forty-five students, there are rooms for the depart- 
mental office, preparation of material, and storage of appa- 
ratus. An additional room is devoted exclusively to mamma- 
lian experiments. In this building there is maintained an 
animal room where is kept an abundance of material for ex- 
perimental purposes. The embalming and storage plant for 
the Department of Anatomy is in physical connection with the 
building and its special departments. The laboratories of 
physiology and pharmacology are completely equipped with 
apparatus lockers so that in accord with the best ideas of in- 
struction, the students work in groups of two each, and each 
group has sufficient apparatus so that the experimental work 
can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general stock- 
room. 

The laboratories of Pathology and Biochemistry are located 
on the third floor of the Dental Building. The former depart- 
ment has a large student laboratory with a capacity of ninety ; 
the tables are so placed as to secure the most satisfactory illu- 
mination for microscopic work, in addition, all of the tables 
are electrically equipped for substage illumination. This 
equipment is also provided for all laboratories where micro- 
scopic work obtains. The museum of the Department of Pa- 
thology adjoins the student laboratory. Here are available for 
demonstration about fifteen hundred carefully prepared and 
mounted specimens, and for laboratory instruction and study, 
an abundance of autopsy material with complete clinical his- 
tories. Several preparation, research, and office rooms com- 
municate with the other rooms of this department. The lab- 
oratory of Biochemistry is constructed and equipped for sec- 
tions of fifty. The laboratory is completely equipped for the 
facilitation of work. The office and stock-room adjoin. In the 
Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged 
for student reference, specimens which represent the careful 
selection of material over a period of many years. In the 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 15 

University Hospital is the Student Laboratory for the analyti- 
cal studies of those students who are serving as clinical clerks 
on the wards. A similar laboratory is maintained in the build- 
ing at the N. W. corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for 
the student work on the wards of the Mercy Hospital. 

In this latter building are two laboratories for Bacteriology, 
Histology, and Clinical Pathology, and an additional dissecting 
room which is used for the course of Topographical Anatomy. 
The two laboratories accommodate one hundred students or the 
full class, and are equipped with necessary lockers for micro- 
scopes and apparatus. Each of the departments housed in this 
building are provided with their individual offices, preparation, 
and stockrooms. 

Clinical Facilities 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital which is the property of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of 
the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 
1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that 
time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for the eye cases. 

The present hospital has a capacity of 275 beds devoted to 
general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly mod- 
ern X-ray department and clinical laboratory, and a postmor- 
tem building which is constructed with special reference to 
the instruction of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings 
so that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture 
halls and laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary 
and wards. 

Owing to its situation, being adjacent to the largest manu- 
facturing district of the city and the shipping district, large 
numbers of accident cases are received. These combined with 
the cases of many sick seamen and with patients from our own 
city furnish a large amount of clinical material. Accommoda- 
tions for thirty obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital 
for the purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to 
each member of the graduating class. 



16 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor ob- 
stetrical clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful 
pre-natal supervision, is attended during labor by a senior 
student, supervised by a hospital physician and assisted by a 
graduate nurse, and is visited during the puerperium by the 
attending student and graduate nurse. Careful pre-natal, labor 
and puerperal records are kept, making this work of extreme 
value to the medical student, not only from the obstetrical 
standpoint, but in making him appreciate the value of social 
service and public health work. 

During the year ending December 31, 1926, 386 cases were 
delivered in the hc-;pital and 987 cases in the outdoor depart- 
ment. Students in the graduating class delivered an average 
-^f fourteen cases, each student being required to deliver twelve 
cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital 
and the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in 
order that the teaching may be the same in each. Each dis- 
pensary has the following departments: Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecol- 
ogy, Gastro-Enterologj?-, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, 
Dermatology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special depart- 
ments one hour each day. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 17 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean. 

M. C. PiNCOFFS, S.B., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, President of the Board of Regents. 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintenderkt of Nurses. 

J. Allison Muir, 

G. M. Shriver, 

W. B. Brooks, 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff 
Page Edmunds, M.D. C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni 
S. G. Davis, M.D. G. Milton Linthicum, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

Physicians 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Paul W. Clough, M.D. Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 
R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatrician 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 



18 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Pathologists 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Reed Rockwood, M.D. 

Surgeons 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Laryngologist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 
R. TUNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeon 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Howard E. Ashbury, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Henry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Anaesthetists 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D. Samuel W. Moore, DD.S. 

W. G. Queen, M.D. 

Obstetricians 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. NovEY, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, A.B., M.D. Isador H. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

William Tarun, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Gynecologists 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D. W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

Hugh Brent, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STALL 19 

RESIDENT STAFF 1927-1928 

Resident Surgeon Dr. R. S. ANDERSON 

Assistant Resident Surgeons Dr. J. E. Elliott and Dr. L. U. Lumpkin 

Resident Physician Dr. F. F. LUSBY 

Assistant Resident Physician Dr. L. 0. Tayuton 

Resident Gynecologist Dr. Walter C. Merkel 

Resident Obstetrician Dr. Knight Reynolds 

Assistant Resident Obstetrician Dr. J. T. Hibbitts 

INTERNES 

Dr. Helen Strayer Dr. James L. Swank 

Dr. Charles H. Stonesifer Dr. Francis B. Teague 

Dr. Charles E. Gill Dr. Henry Davis 

Dr. John R. Phillips Dr. Herbert E. Reifschnbider 

Dr. H. V. Staton Dr. Elijah Covington 

Dr. C. F. Karns Dr. J. M. Brice 

Dr. C. W. Peake 

Dr. A. H. FiNKELSTEiN — Interne on Pediatrics 
Dr. James G. Saffel — Intetme on B. & 0. Service 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Medicine 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
RoscoE C. Metzel, M.D. W. H. Triplett, M.D. 

William Michel, M.D. Joseph Rosenblatt, M.D. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D. Leo Lally, M.D. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D. Thomas Coonan, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 
J. H. Ullrich, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. N. J. Davidov, M.D. 

Leo T. Brown, M.D. C. Vance Hooper, M.D. 

Neurology 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D. Milford Levy, M.D. 

Robert Hodes, M.D. 

Psychiatry 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Nicholas W. Pinto, M.D. Morris L. Scheindlinger, M.D. 

Harry W. Rosenthal, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STALL 

Diseases of the Lungs 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Disease of Metabolism 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Pediatrics 
Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics 
C. LoRiNG JosLiN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
William J. Todd, M.D. F. Stratner Orem, M.D. 

Clarence Macke, M.D. William G. Geyer, M.D. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. George A. Knipp, M.D. 

Bernard J. Ferry, M.D. , R. M. Hening, M.D. 

Marie Kovner, M.D. J. J. McGarrell, M.D. 

Clewell Howell, M.D. Elizabeth Sherman, M.D. 

M. N. PUTTERMAN, M.D. SAMUEL WOLFE, M.D. 

Samuel Click, M.D. A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. 

Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. M. Foster, M.D. E. S. Johnson, M.D. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. W. R. Johnson, M.D. 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. James Brown, M.D. 

F. A. SiGRiST, M.D. S. H. Culver, M.D. 
R. H. Wiggins, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

R. TUNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

G enito- Urinary 
W. H. TOULSON, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Harris Goldman, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

J. H. COLLINSON, M.D. H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D. L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

X-Ray 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Roentgenolgist 

Dermatology 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. E. Gately, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 



21 



Nose and -Throat 

E. A. LOOPER, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Frank B. Anderson, Chief of Clinic 

F. A. HoLDEN, M.D. Charles Cahn, M.D. 

Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. George L. Wissig, M.D. 

William J. Fulton, M.D. 

Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, B.A., M.D. M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, M.D. 

Maxwell Mazer, M.D. 

Eye and Ear 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Charles Cahn, M.D. John G. Runkel, M.D. 

Social Service 

Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 
October 1, 1925, to September SO, 1926 

, Cases ^ 

Department New Old Total 

Pediatrics 2,192 17,535 19,727 

Dermatology 3,864 7,761 11,625 

Surgery 1,921 6,740 8,661 

Obstetrics 1,526 4,457 5,983 

Eye and Ear 1,704 3,765 5,469 

Genito-Urinary 838 4,392 5,230 

Medicine 1,067 3,805 4,872 

Gynecology 1,047 2,025 3,072 

Orthopedic 308 1,873 2,181 

Nose and Throat 930 803 1,733 

Neurology 419 948 1,367 

Gastro-Intestinal 247 744 991 

Tuberculosis 260 198 458 

Psychiatry 184 272 456 

Cystoscopy 52 225 277 

Total 16,559 55,543 72,102 

In addition to the above there were treated in the State Veneral Clinic 
20,355 patients. 



22 MERCY HOSPITAL 



MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at 
the comer of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the 
Washington University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the 
Hospital came under the control of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their v/ork of adminis- 
tering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hos- 
pital, as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate 
the rapidly-growing demands upon it. However, it was not 
until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the 
Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, were able 
to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building 
was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then the grow- 
ing demands for more space has compelled the erection of addi- 
tions, until now there are accommodations for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City 
Hospital to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 800,000 
inhabitants. 

The clinical m.aterial in the free wards is under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

It adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients from 
the public wards are operated upon in the College operating 
rooms. This union of the Hospital and College buildings 
greatly facilitates the clinical teaching, as there is no tim.e lost 
in passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and 
Electric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company and its branches. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 23 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Samuel S. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman 
Sister M. Carmelita Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Sister M. Sienna Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Sister M. Hildegarde W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Sister M. Anita H. G. Beck, M.D. 

Sister M. Geraldine F. D. Sanger, M.D. 

Sister M. Fabian T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
SURGICAL DIVISION 
Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Elliott Hutchins, M.D. 

W. D. Wise, M.D. A. M. Evans, M.D. 

C. F. Blake, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons 
R. H. LOCHER, M.D. I. 0. RiDGLEY, M.D. 

T. R. Chambers, M.D. Everard Briscoe, M.D. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D. N. C. Marvel, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Assistant Surgeons 
Charles Maxson, M.D. Dwight Mohr, M.D. 

A. B. McElwain, M.D. H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

T. J. TOUHEY, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 
H. K. Fleck, M.D. J. W. Dovi^NEY, M.D. 

Rhinologists and Laryngologists 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

W. F. Zinn, M.D. Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

Associate 
F. A. Paceenza, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Associate 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon 
V Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



24 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Assistant 
K. W. GOLLEY, M.D. 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis, M.D. 

Assistant 
Kenneth B. Legge, M.D. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. Gary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 

Associates 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 

C. C. W. JuDD, M.D. George McLean, M.D. 

F. T. Kyper, M.D. A. A. Sussman, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. L. A. M. Krause 
E. E. Mayer, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Pediatricians 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Assistant 
F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Assistant 
Milford Levy, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 25 

Dermatologist 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 
Charles E. Brack, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

A. Samuels, M.D. J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

G. A. Strauss, M.D. E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 
William S. Gardner, M.D. Abraham Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

E. P. Smith, M.D. J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

E. S. Eldavitch, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 
Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. Collenberg 

H. R. Peters, M.D. Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians 

Sister M. Joan, Ph.G., R.N. Anna Chenoweth, R.N., 

Frances Donovan, R,N. 



X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographers 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. W. Golley, M.D. 

Technician — Sister M. de Sales, R.N. 



26 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Resident Physician 
J. E. Eastland, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician 
Wm. C. Polsue, M.D. 

Resident Sturgeon 
E. M. Robertson, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons 
J. L. WiNSTEAD, M.D. W. H. Lawson, M.D. 

C. Y. Graves, M.D. V. K. Young, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist 
E. B. Wallace, M.D. 



T. N. Carey, M.D. 
H. W. Elliason, M.D. 
F. W. GiLLis, M.D. 
J. J. Leyko, M.D. 



Internes 



J. G. Benesunes, M.D. 
S. A. Tumminello, M.D. 
G. P. Lilly, M.D. 
Ira Branfield, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 27 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 

Surgery Supervisors 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. W. D. Wise, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons 
D. H. MOHR, M.D. D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

I. O. Ridgley, M.D. H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

John O'Connor, M.D. T. J. Touhey, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery 

A. J. GiLLis, M.D. K. B. Legge, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. W. Golley, M.D. 

Medicine Supervisors 
W. F. LocKWOOD, M.D. M. C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 

B. T. Baggott, M.D. F. T. Kyper, M.D. 

J. M. Miller, M.D. Albert Scagnetti, M.D. 

A. A. SusSMAN, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 

A. A. SusSMAN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lungs 

B. T. Baggott, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



28 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 



Diseases of Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 



Attending Physicians 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 
M. Feldman, M.D. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



W. F. ZiNN, M.D., Esophagoscopist 

Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. GiLLis, M.D. 



S. ZiNBERG, M.D. 
A. ElSENBERG, M.D. 
J. N. ZlERLER, M.D. 

I. I. Levy, M.D. 



MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 



Attending Physicians 



R, A. Warner, M.D. 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 



E. P. Smith, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 



Diseases of Women 
Supervisors 

Attending Surgeons 

E. Edlavitch, M.D. 



A. Samuels, M.D. 



T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

C. F. J. COUGHLIN, M.D. 



W. F. ZiNN, M.D. 



H. F. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



Diseases of Nose and Throat 

F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 



M. Raskin, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Proctology 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 



Dermatology 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

Assistant 
William G. Coppage, M.D. 



Sister M. Helen, R.N 



Social Service Department 

Catherine Campbell, R.N. 



New 


Total 


955 


3,714 


1,101 


2,886 


314 


1,004 


397 


1,231 


607 


1,098 


69 


267 


80 


203 


98 


513 


105 


193 


42 


100 


203 


1,280 


169 


555 


692 


5,903 



MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 29 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

, Cases ^ 

Department Old 

Surgical 2,759 

Medical 1,785 

Gynecologist 690 

Eye and Ear 834 

Nose and Throat 491 

Neurological 198 

Children 123 

Gastro Intestinal 436 

Dental 88 

Rectal 58 

Orthopedic 1,077 

Skin 386 

Genito-Urinary 5,211 

Total 14,116 4,828 18,954 



OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 
THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely 
increased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of 
City Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals 
to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are 
daily visits and cHnics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of 
the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness in study, and the use made 
of it in medical teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following sepa- 
rate hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 

The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 180 beds. 

The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 

The Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 



30 STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL 

STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

VISITING STAFF 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Tuberculosis Hospital. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Physician-in-Charge of the Detention Hospital 

for the Insane. 
Wiley D. Forbus, A.B., M.D., Visiting Pathologist. 
Vernon H. Norwood, A.B., M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

Otologist 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Gynecologists 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist 
W. H. TOULSON, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngologists 

H. R. Slack, M.D. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Pediatrician 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Oliver Smith, A.B., M.D. 



Henry J. Berkley, M.D. 
Adolph Meyer, M.D. 

Orthopedist 
H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Proctologist 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.B., M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Physician 
Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 31 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF MARYLAND 

FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution contains 100 beds for the active treatment 
of deformities, a new fire-proof building having been recently 
added, with every possible facihty for the operative and physi- 
cal treatment of these cases. It owns an estate known as 
''Radnor Park," of colonial origin, comprising 75 acres, at 
Hillsdale, within the northwestern city Hmits, and may be 
reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds 
and rooms with private baths and terraces adjacent, overlook- 
ing a beautiful park-like environment, especially adapted for 
heliotherapy in tuberculosis, rhachitic, osteomyelitic and arth- 
ritic conditions. A dairy and farm are maintained in connec- 
tion with this hospital. The dispensary of this hospital is main- 
tained across the street from the University Hospital, with 
which this institution is in close affiliation, for didactic, clin- 
ical, dispensary and bedside instruction. It is the Orthopaedic 
Department of the University of Maryland, and maintained in 
connection with it is a well-equipped Physiotherapy branch, 
affording the student an opportunity to familiarize himself 
with the newer methods in the application of actinotherapy, 
diathermy, thermotherapy, electricity and hydrotherapy. 



STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director 
R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D. 

Associate Surgeons 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Clement R. Monroe, M.D. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, A.B., M.D., D.T.M.&H. (London) 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



32 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 

Assistant and Dispensary Surgeons 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D. ARNOLD LAWSON JENSEN, B.Sc, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S. (Eng. Ire.) Hon. 

Randolph Winslow, A.B., M.A., M.D., LL.D. 

Surgeon 
Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Plastic Surgeon 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

N euro-Surgeon 
Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist and Aurist 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D., LL.D. 

Oculist and Aurist 
William Tarun, M.D., 

Laryngologist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Assistant Laryngolo gists 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. Allen Holden, M.D. 

Everett L. Bishop, M.D. Marshall T. Bylerly, M.D. 

Dentists 
J. B. Bell, D.D.S. C. Merle Dixon, Jr., D.D.S. 

Consulting Physicians 
Lewellys F. Barker, A.B.,M.D. Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist 
Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologist 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Pathologist 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 33 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Resident Surgeon 
Clement R. Monroe, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeon 
Arnold Lawson Jensen, B.Sc, M.D. 

Resident Student Interne 
Samuel Philip Sardo 

Head Nurse 
Miss Grace Lovell Elgin, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse 
Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapists, Masseuses and Instructors in Corrective Gymnastics 
Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Miss Elizabeth Emory Miss Florence Grape 



Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instructors in Grammar School 
Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal Miss Mary Sampson, Assistant 

Superintendent and Business Manager 
Mrs. M. E. Lane 



34 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 
ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 



The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Mary- 
land by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this 
school to present to its students liberal opportunities for the 
study of diseases of infants and children. 



STAFF 



Obstetrician 
Dr. L. H. Douglass 



Dr. V^. C. Bacon 

Dr. C. R. Goldsborough 



Pediatricians 



Dr. W. H. Ingram 
Dr. C. L. Joslin 



Surgeon 
Dr. N. Winslow 

Dermatologist 
Dr. J. A. Buchness 



Dr. C. a. Clapp 



Oculists 



Dr. F. B. Anderson 



Orthopedic Surgeon 
Dr. V^. H. Daniels 



Dr. C. p. Clautice 



Epidemiologist 
Dr. Samuel Click 



LIBRARIES 35 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE 
AND FEEBLE-MINDED 

The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital. This insti- 
tution is one of the most modem hospitals for the treatment 
and care of the insane in this country. It is well endowed and 
its superintendent is R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of 
Psychiatry at the University of Maryland. In this hospital 
intensive treatment and study of mental diseases is carried on, 
a large number of the patients entering voluntary. The stu- 
dents under the direction of Dr. Chapman and his assistants 
in a series of clinics are shown the early manifestations and 
the various stages of mental diseases, the methods of treat- 
ment, and their effect. Special attention is given to etiological 
factors and the discussion of prevention. 

Spring Grove Hospital. Through the courtesy of the Su- 
perintendent of this institution, the Professor of Psychiatry is 
enabled to present to the weekly clinics to the fourth-year class 
the different types of psychoses and psycho-neuroses. 

LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of 
the collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 24,601 vol- 
umes, a file of 70 current (medical) journals, and several thou- 
sand pamphlets and reprints. It is well stocked with recent 
literature, including books and periodicals of general interest. 
The home of the Library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and 
commodious building in close proximity to the classrooms and 
the Laboratories of the Medical Department. The Library is 
open daily during the year, except in August, for use of mem- 
bers of the Faculty, the students, and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land, containing 50,000 volumes, is open to the students of the 
school. The leading medical publications of the world are re- 
ceived by the Library, and complete sets of many journals are 
available. Other Libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody 
(215,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library (497,901 
volumes) . 

All these Libraries are open to the students of the school 
without charge. 



36 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision 
of teaching in this school in order to meet modem require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialties in medicine and sur- 
gery necessitates a very crowded course and the introduction of 
electives will very soon be depended on to solve some of the 
difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments : 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, 
but in no case are the students of different years thrown to- 
gether in the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study 
of the structures and functions of the normal body. Labora- 
tory work occupies most of the student's time during these 
two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is 
given in the second year. The third and fourth years are 
almost entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt 
to bring together teacher and student in close personal relation- 
ship. In many courses of instruction the classes are divided 
into small groups and a large number of instructors insures 
attention to the needs of each student. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 37 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of 
proficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is 
determined largely by partial examinations, recitations and 
assigned work carried on throughout the course. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 
AND EMBRYOLOGY 

C. L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Wm. R. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

RoBT. W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Jas. W. Nelson, M.D Assistant in Histology 

J. HuLLA, M.D Assistant in Histology 

First Year. Didactic. Five hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. Each day, preceding the laboratory period, a quiz 
and demonstration of from forty to fifty minutes is held, cov- 
ering the laboratory work for the day. 

Laboratory. Eighteen hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. This course includes a complete dissection of the 
human body, including the central nervous system. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in 
his work by competent demonstrators. Pi'actical examinations 
are held at frequent intervals throughout the session, and each 
student will be held to strict account for material furnished 
him. Each student is furnished a skeleton, and a deposit is 
required to insure its return in good condition at the end of 
the session. 

The last six weeks of this course is devoted to a dissection 
of the brain and a study of the structure of the central nervous 
system. 

Histology and Embryology 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, 
eight hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Histology and 
embryology are taught as a common subject, the histogenesis 
of a part preceding its histological study. 



38 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The most important part of the work will be done in the 
laboratory, where each student will be provided with appa- 
ratus, staining fluids and material necessary for the prepara- 
tion of specimens for microscopial examination. An impor- 
tant aid to the course is the projection microscope and balop- 
ticon which are used for the projection upon a screen of mag- 
nified images of the specimens actually used in the laboratory, 
and of illustrations from standard text-books. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

A. H. Ryan, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D .- Associate Professor of Physiology 

Ferdinand A. Ries, M.D Associate in Physiology 

George A. Knipp, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

1. Physiology. The required course consists of lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work, demonstrations and conferences 
in the first and second years. 

First Year. Two periods weekly of one hour each are given 
during the second half of the first year. These lectures are de- 
voted to a general survey of the subject; the appHcation of 
physical and physico-chemical methods to experimental physi- 
ology ; the application of statistical methods and the presenta- 
tion of results. The physiology of vision is also covered in 
lectures, the laboratory work being given in the second year. 

Second Year, Three one-hour periods weekly throughout the 
year are devoted to lectures and recitations. At these lectures 
charts, lantern slides and demonstrations are used. Three 
hours weekly during the first semester and six hours per week 
during the second semester are spent in the laboratory. 

The laboratory work of the second year begins with a study 
of irritability and contractility and with methods of making 
precise quantitative physiological observations and controls, 
curve platting, interpretation of data and the use of physiolog- 
ical apparatus. Students work in groups of two at completely 
equipped desks, and the material consists largely of the frog 
and turtle. 

This is followed by experiments in which the students work 
in groups of four to six, largely upon mammals as well as 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

themselves, and includes the subjects circulation and body 
fluids, respiration, digestion, secretion, metabolism, internal 
secretion, central nervous system and special senses. Certain 
experiments are performed aseptically upon the internal secre- 
tions and nervous system, the students themselves presenting 
their cases along with their study of the literature to the re- 
mainder of the class. Specially equipped laboratories are used 
for certain parts of the work. Students are taught to treat 
animals with the same consideration and interest as patients. 

The work is arranged to illustrate fundamental principles of 
physiology and at the same time familiarize the students in 
methods of thought and technique essential to diagnosis and 
directly applicable to the clinic and bedside. 

2. Clinical Physiology. During the second semester of 
the second year a one-hour clinic is held each week by the 
Department of Medicine to correlate physiology and medicine 
and serve as an introduction to the work of the clinical years. 

3. Elective Work. This is offered to students of the 
third and fourth years, without credit, in the following sub- 
jects: basal metabolism, internal secretions and central nerv- 
ous system. 

4. Research. Hours to be arranged. The facilities of the 
laboratory are available to qualified persons to undertake orig- 
inal investigation, the laboratory bearing all reasonable ex- 
pense for material. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D Professor of Bacteriology 

Louis F. Krumrein, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the second year during the first semester. This 
includes the various methods of preparation and sterilization 
of culture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bac- 
teriological examination of water and milk. The bacteriolog- 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

ical diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also included in 
this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also 
studied in the laboratory. The principles of general bacteri- 
ology are taught by quiz, conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of 
quizzes, conferences and lectures to the second-year class 
throughout the second semester, and practical experiments are 
carried out by the class in laboratory sessions of three hours 
each, held twice weekly during the semester. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Instructor in Biological Chemistry 

Instruction in biological chemistry comprises laboratory 
work, lectures and conferences. 

The laboratory work consists in the study of important indi- 
cators, volumetric solutions, buffer solutions, colloids and mem- 
brane phenomena followed by experiments illustrating the 
physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, proteins 
and lipins. Subsequently, the examination of hydrolytic and 
oxidative enzymes, gastric contents, tissues of the body, bile, 
milk and the investigations of blood and urine chemistry con- 
clude the assigned experimental work. 

The lectures treat of laboratory technic, the chemistry of 
indicators, hydrogen-ion concentration, the physical chemistry 
of the cell, osmosis, diffusion, dialysis, the law of mass action, 
reversible reactions, catalysis and enzymes. The following 
lectures refer to the metabolism of water, salts, other inorganic 
substances, carbohydrates, proteins and lipins, vitamins and 
deficiency diseases, dietary requirements, basal metabolism, 
acid-base balance and, finally, the secretions and excretions. 

The conferences are conducted by one of the instructors and 
take the form of short, written examinations and informal 
oral quizzes. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA 

William Henry Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

0. G. Harne, A.B Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne Assistant in Pharmacology 

Ruth Muser, A.B Assistant in Pharmacology 

1. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 56 hours required. 
The methods now used in presenting- the subject-matter of 

Materia Medica and Prescription Writing have evolved as a 
result of some years of practical teaching. The science of 
Pharmacology has introduced methods of critical analysis in 
the choice of drugs proposed for use as medicine. As aids in 
determining the particular drugs chosen for study, use is made 
of the "United States Pharmacopoeia" and "New and Non- 
Official Remedies." 

Official titles, whenever practicable, are expressed in Eng- 
lish and all quantities are stated in terms of the metric system. 
The only way to get away from the unscientific system of Eng- 
lish weights and measures, and from a Latin system which few 
ever learn correctly is to refuse to teach either one of them. 

When possible, drugs are grouped according to their chem- 
ical composition and the influence of various radicals and side 
chains emphasized, whereas drugs, the chemistry of v/hich is 
not definitely established, are grouped according to their domi- 
nant physiological action. Following- the Pharmacology of a 
given group, their place in practical medicine is indicated, and 
the student is requested to prescribe same in suitable form. 
Thus a Materia Medica is developed throughout the course, 
based upon Pharmacological action of drugs. 

2. Systematic Pharmacology. 96 hours required. Second 
year. In this portion of the course the student is taught Phar- 
macology as a pure science. The aim is to attain a mean be- 
tween that which has a purely scientific bearing and that domi- 
nantly practical, so that both a critical attitude toward drugs 
and an understanding of the principles of dosage may be ac- 
quired. This is accomplished by lectures, quiz, conference and 
the following course of laboratory exercises. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. 96 hours. Second year. This lab- 
oratory course runs parallel with Pharmacology 2. Many of 



42 ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 

the most important problems of Immunology, Parasitic intoxi- 
cations, and of Chemotherapy are essentially Pharmacological. 
In the first part of the course the experiments are upon normal 
animals, hence primarily toxocological in character. In the 
latter part of the course more and more emphasis is laid upon 
what is now designated as chemo-therapeutic index of drugs. 

4. Pharmacology of General and Local Anesthetics and 
Soporifics, Four weeks, 3 lectures, 3 laboratory periods a 
week. This is a special course designed to meet the needs of 
physician and graduate nurse who wish 'to acquire a knowledge 
of the more recent developments in the pharmacology of de- 
pressant and sleep-producing drugs. The course is so arranged 
that those properly qualified may continue the work under ex- 
pert anesthetists in the wards of the hospitals connected with 
the university. Professor Schultz. 

5. Research in Pharmacology and Chemo-Therapy, Prop- 
erly qualified students are admitted to the laboratory with a 
view to their carrying on original investigations in drug action. 
Thoroughly equipped laboratories are well adapted for post- 
graduate study and research in Pharmacology. Hours will be 
arranged to suit the applicant. Professor Schultz. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D Associate in Pathology 

ROBHRT B. Wright, M.D Associate in Pathology 

Emile Duskes, M.D Associate in Pathology 

M. Alexander Novey, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Monte Edwards, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Wm. S. Love, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

A. A. SussMAN, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Howard M. Bubert, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Samuel Click, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Vernon L. Norwood, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in Pathology are given during the 
second and third years. These courses are based on previous 
study of normal structure and function and aim to outhne the 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

natural history of disease. Instruction is made as practical as 
possible that the student may become familiar with the appear- 
ance of tissues in disease and may be able to correlate anatomi- 
cal lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology and Histo-Pathology, This course 
is given to second-year students. It includes the study and 
demonstration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances 
of structure, nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of 
fat, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pig- 
ment metabolism, inflammation and tumors. Tlie laboratory 
course consists in a daily preliminary talk on the subject for 
study, following which the student takes up the study of micro- 
scopical sections. Gross material from autopsy and from the 
museum is demonstrated in conjunction with the microscopical 
sections. 

2. Applied Pathology, Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. Third-year student: In this course 
the special relationship of the gross and microscopical lesions 
to clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. Fresh material 
from autopsy collected at the various hospitals is demonstrated 
and supplemented by a study of the respective autopsy proto- 
cols. 

3. Autopsies. Third Year. Autopsy technic is taught to 
small groups of students by special instruction at autopsies 
performed at the various hospitals. Students are required to 
assist at the autopsy, study the organs, examine the micro- 
scopical sections, make cultures and prepare autopsy protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathology Conference. Fourth Year. In col- 
laboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from 
autopsies is studied with reference to the correlation of the 
clinical aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified stu- 
dents will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work 
along the lines of experimental pathology. 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D., 

Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 
Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. JUDD, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

H. D. McCarty, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

C. C. Habliston, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Reed Rockwood, A.B., M.S., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

L. a. M. Krause, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D Associate in Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Associate in Medicine 

H. M. BUBERT, M.D Associate in Medicine 

R. C. Metzel, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

William Michel, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Edward Novak, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

A. A. SusSMAN, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

F. T. Kyper, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

William A. Strauss Instructor in Medicine 

Septima C. Smith, A.M., Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

W. H. Woody, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

GENERAL OUTLINE 

Second Year 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester.) 
(2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient depart- 
ment and in the clinical laboratory. 

II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week) . 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neu- 
rology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 

III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week) . 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical 
therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year 

The practice of medicine. 

I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical 
examination, laboratory examinations and progress notes of 
assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 
(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week.) 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the Univer- 
sity Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each 
student spends two periods a week of two hours each in dis- 



46 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

pensary work. The work is done in groups of four to six stu- 
dents under an instructor. Systematic history-taking is espe- 
cially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. The stu- 
dent becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic 
disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions in topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and 
each section receives instruction for four hours a week for the 
entire session in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The 
large clinical material of the dispensaries and hospitals is util- 
ized to give each student the opportunity to familiarize himself 
with the common types of bodily structure, with the normal 
variations in physical signs and with the physical signs of the 
chief pulmonary, circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are 
taken up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the 
chief diseases is then reviewed. Two hours a week. Dr. 
Lockard. 

The principles of physical therapy are taught in a special 
lecture and demonstration course consisting of six one-hour 
periods. Dr. Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the prac- 
tical application of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching 
and the chief therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in 
physical diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sections 
of the class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Stress is 
laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the disease, 
as well as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis 
will be dealt with in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic man- 
agement of syphilis will be offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D. Instructor in Medicine 

William A. Strauss, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Septima C. Smith, A.M., Sc.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in 
the technique of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he 
is able to perform all routine examination which may be called 
for during his fourth year, in connection with the work in the 
wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic 
lectures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff 
of the department takes an active part. The microscopical and 
chemical study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric 
juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively taken up, 
and special attention directed to the clinical significance of the 
findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting 
agent and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student is 
provided with a microscope, blood counters and hemoglobino- 
meter for his exclusive use, and every two students with a 
special laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has 
learned during the preceding year in the laboratories of the 
various affiliated hospitals. He is also supplied with a labora- 
tory outfit which is sufficiently complete to enable him to work 
independently of the general equipment. Special instructors 
are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D._Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. KOPPELMAN, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

N. J. Davidov, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

I. S. Zinberg, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph N. Zierler, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Isidore I. Levy, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Leo T. Brown, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Vance Hooper, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year. Clinics, recitations and demonstrations to 
the class for one hour a week throughout the session. Dispen- 
sary instruction to small groups throughout the entire session. 
Practical instruction in the differential and clinical diagnosis 
and demonstrations of the newer methods of diagnosis in gas- 
tro-intestinal affections. 



PSYCHIATRY 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen 
clinical lectures and five cHnics which are designed to be intro- 
ductory to the more intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth 
year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical 
conferences on selected groups of cases. Each student works 
for a short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic, 
and thus gains practical experience of the problems of history- 
taking, examination, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



49 



PEDIATRICS 

Charles L. Summers, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

C. LORING JOSLIN, M.D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 



John H. Traband, M.D Associate 

William J. Todd, M.D Instructor 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Instructor 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Instructor 

William G. Geyer, M.D Instructor 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Instructor 

George A. Knipp, M.D Instructor 

Bernard J. Ferry, M.D Instructor 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D Instructor 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D Instructor 

R. M. Hening, M.D Assistant 

Marie Kovner, M.D Assistant 

J. J. McGarrell, M.D Assistant 

Clewell Howell, M.D Assistant 

Samuel Wolfe, M.D Assistant 

Samuel Click, M.D Assistant 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D Assistant 



n Pediatrics 
in Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
Ti Pediatrics 
■n Pediatrics 
in Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
Pediatrics 



M. N. Putterman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Third Year: Instruction during the third year consists of 
one lecture each week in which infant feeding and the rnost 
important diseases of infancy and childhood are especially em- 
phasized. Drs. Sumners and Friedenwald. 

Fourth Year. During this year a weekly clinical lecture is 
given where the character of disease is fully demonstrated and 
the students are afforded an opportunity for personal exam- 
ination of all cases. In addition, ward classes are held weekly 
where bedside instruction is given. A section of the class also 
works daily at the Babies' and Children's Clinic. This clinic, 
which is under the direction of Dr. Summers, has a yearly at- 
tendance of more than twenty thousand, and offers an excel- 
lent opportunity for study and observation of a wide variety 
of cases under competent instructors. 

Instruction is also given on the Children's Ward at the 
Mercy Hospital. 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., 

Associate Professor on Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology 

MiLFORD Levy, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Robert Hodes, M.D. Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week 
to the entire class. Instruction in chnical neurology tv^o hours 
a week at the City Hospital to small groups. By means of 
didactic lectures and clinical conferences, there are considered 
the commoner types of diseases of the nervous system, the 
methods of neurological examination, and the relationship of 
signs and symptoms to pathological conditions. The material 
at University and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference, one hour each week to 
the entire class. This subject is taught at the University and 
Mercy Hospitals. All cases presented at these clinics are care- 
fully examined ; complete written records are made by the stu- 
dents who demonstrate the cases before the class. The cases 
are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are pre- 
sented, and each student in the class must prepare one or more 
cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in 
close personal contact with the cases in the wards under the 
supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four after- 
noons each week. In this way students are brought into con- 
tact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later mani- 
festations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDiaNE 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM., 

Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

V. L. ELLIOTT, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

M. G. TULL, M.D Instructor in Hygiene ar.d Public Health 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

Third Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. 
The lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: Air, 
Water, Soil, Food, Disposal of Wastes, Communicable Diseases, 
State and Federal Public Health Laws, and Industrial Diseases. 
Small groups visit the Sydenham Hospital weekly and are given 
practical instruction in the diagnosis, treatment and isolation 
of the contagious diseases. 

Fourth Year. Small groups visit the City Board of Health 
Laboratories for practical instruction in the laboratory field 
and administrative aspects of public health work. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. One hour each week for one semester. 

Inasmuch as Medical Jurisprudence teaches the application 
of every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, 
civil or criminal, this course embraces the following : Proceed- 
ings in criminal and civil prosecution; medical evidence and 
testimony ; identity in its general relations ; sexual abnormali- 
ties ; personal identity ; impotence and sterility ; rape ; criminal 
abortions; signs of death; wounds in their medico-legal rela- 
tions ; death, natural and homicidal ; malpractice ; insanity and 
medico-legal autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Elliot H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Surgery 

E. S. Johnson, M.D Associate in Surgery 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate in Surgery 

M. J. Hanna, M.D Associate in Surgery 

H. M. Foster, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

F. X. Kearney, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

C. F. Horine, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

D. J. Passagno, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

DwiGHT MOHR, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. R. Geraghty, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde Marvel, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

I. 0. RiDGELY, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. M. McElwain, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

James Brown, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

E. W. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching- is done in the Anatomical Laboratory and the 
dispensaries, wards, cHnical laboratories and operating rooms 
of the University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and 
dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospital. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dis- 
pensary work, bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. 
The work begins in the second year, and continues throughout 
the third and fourth years. 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. 10 hours a week for 
the first semester. The course is designed to bridge the gap 
between anatomy in the abstract, and clinical anatomy as ap- 
plied to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and stu- 
dents are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and re- 
gions on the cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected when 
necessary to bring out outlines and relations of structures. 

Didactic Lectures, Two hours a week for one semester, aug- 
mented by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross 
section. Dr. Holland. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

Laboratory. Eight hours a week for the first semester. 
Dr. Hanna, assisted by Drs. Brady, Hundley, Warfieid, Boyd 
and Mr. Clark. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history taking, 
records of physical examinations and of operations and prog- 
ress notes ; the preparation of surgical dressings, suture mate- 
rials and solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, 
gangrene, fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage and shock ; the use 
of spHnts, bed frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local 
anaesthesia and the preparation of patients for operations. 
Lectures and conferences. Two hours per week for one semes- 
ter to the entire class. Dr. Edwards. 

Third Year 

General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and 
general surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the 
entire class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Dr. Shipley. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in 
history-taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the 
bedside and in the dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospital. 
Drs. Shipley, Lynn and Reifschneider. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative sur- 
gery upon the cavader and on dogs. The class is divided into 
sections, and each section is given practical and individual work 
under the supervision of the instructors. Dr. Frank S. Lynn, 
assisted by Drs. Nathan Winslow, Hay ward, E. S. Johnson, 
Foster, Geraghty, Demarco, Horine, Pessagno, Onnen, Maxson, 
W. R. Johnson, Buchness, Hanrahan, Brown, Steinmueller and 
Segrist. 

Fractures and Dislocations. Twenty-four hours to the en- 
tire class. This course consists of instruction in the various 
forms of fractures and dislocations and their treatment, and 
serves as a preparatory course for clinical work. Drs. Wise 
and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes 
the history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the 
diagnosis, and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of 
the ambulatory surgical cases in the University and in the 
Mercy Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Ridg- 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

ley, Passagno, Bongardt and McElwain. University Hospital — 
Drs. Holland, Lynn, Nathan Winslow, Edwards, E. S. Johnson 
and Foster. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic will be given at the Mercy and at 
the University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the 
year. As far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy 
Hospital — Dr. McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the oper- 
ating-room and museum are studied in the gross and micro- 
scopically, in relation with the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treat- 
ment of accident cases, with instructions as to the relationship 
between the state, the employee, the employer, and the physi- 
cian's duty to each. One hour a week to sections of the class 
throughout the year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of University and of 
Mercy Hospitals, history-taking, and physical examination of 
patients, laboratory examinations, attendance at operations and 
observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will 
consist of ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the 
after-care of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlan- 
nan, Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Jennings. University 
Hospital — Drs. Shipley, Holland, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 

ANAESTHESIA 
Second Year 

Lectures on history of anaesthesia: Ancient and Modern. 
General physiology of anaesthesia. Special physiology of each 
anaesthetic agent. Different methods for producing general 
anaesthesia, with a detailed description of each. The selection 
of the anaesthetic and method best suited for its administra- 
tion in particular cases. Difficulties and accidents during and 
following anaesthesia, their causes, prevention and control. 
Different methods of resuscitation. Blood pressure: Its sig- 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 55 

nificance and bearing on selection of the anaesthetic and use as 
a guide during anaesthesia. 

Eight hours to the entire class. Drs. S. Griffith Davis and 
W. G. Queen. 

Fourth Year 

During the clinics and operations before small groups, each 
student will be required to observe the administration of anaes- 
thetics and to keep a chart recording blood pressure, pulse and 
respiration under the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Associate Professor in Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

A. C. Monninger, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Harry Wasserman, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases 
of the skin. Dr. Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital, Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the 
common skin diseases. Drs. Abercrombie, Robinson and 
Gately. Dispensary instruction, Mercy Hospital. Dr. Rosen- 
thal. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

COMPTON RiELY, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Clement R. Monroe, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, A.B., M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Wheeler, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Arnold Lawson Jensen, B.Sc, M.D._Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient in- 
struction will be given. This instruction is provided in the 
University Hospital Amphitheatre, Mercy Hospital and Dis- 
pensary and Kernan Hospital and Industrial School for Crip- 
pled Children at "Radnor Park" and in the Dispensary of same 
at 620 West Lombard Street. 



56 ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 

Lectures or clinics will be held at each of the hospitals named 
in town once a week. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic will 
be held for small sections of the class at "Radnor Park" and 
Mercy Hospital. Sectional quizzes are held at stated intervals 
with mid-year and final examinations. 

The course will cover instruction in the special methods of 
examination, pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this spe- 
cialty. X-ray interpretation will be stressed. The lectures will 
cover : 

Tuberculosis of the spine, bones and joints; non-tuberculous 
affections of the spine, bones and joints ; fractures, non-union, 
mal-union, pyogenic infections, malignancy, abnonnalities and 
the arthritides. Arthrodesis and arthrolysis. Rickets and 
scurvy. Osteomalacia, chondro-dystrophies and osteitis de- 
formans. Torticollis and the paralyses. Bursal, tendinous and 
muscular affections. Surgery of the hands and feet. 

A brief outline and demonstration will also be given of the 
apparatus employed in Physiotherapy in using Actinotherapy, 
Thermotherapy, Electrotherapy, Hydrotherapy, Massage and 
Corrective Gymnastics in treating bone, joint and muscular 
disabilities. 

ROENTGENOLOGY AND RADIOTHERAPY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Charles Reid Edwards, A.B., M.D Associate in Radio Therapy 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

Instruction is given in the history, physics, and practical ap- 
plication of Roentgen Rays and Radium. Especial effort is 
made to demonstrate the use of the Roentgen Ray in diagnosis 
by instruction in both fluroscopy and plate reading. The sec- 
tions of the fourth-year class receive two hours' instruction 
each week. 

The student is also taught the practical appHcation of 
Radium and Roentgen Rays as therapeutic agents. In the 
X-Ray laboratory and in the hospital wards students are shown 
the use of these agents in the treatment of disease. 



I 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE 

Edw. a. Looper, M.D Clinical Prof, of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D.__Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
R. F. McKenzie, M.D Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the com- 
mon diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially 
directed to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance 
of focal infections in the etiology of general diseases and mod- 
ern methods of diagnosis. Lectures are illustrated by lantern 
slides. Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily to small sec- 
tions at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student 
is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat practical 
cases under an instructor. Ward classes and clinical demon- 
strations are given one and one-half hours weekly throughout 
the session in the University and the Mercy Hospitals. 



GENITO-URINARY DISEASES 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Harris Goldman, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Austin H. Wood, M.D. Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. GiLLls, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Monte Edwards, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. C. Knapp, M.D. Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

J. H. Collison, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. J. MiLLAN, M.D. Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

William Emrich, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

T. Willis Guyton, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

K. D. Legge, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Third Year. 8 hours to the entire class. This course is a 
didactic one in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. 
Toulson. 



58 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystos- 
copy, ureter catheterization, renal functional tests, urography, 
urine cultures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the 
amphitheater, ward rounds, and attendance by members of 
the Senior class upon our patients in the dispensary. The dis- 
pensary classes are carried on both at the Mercy and the Uni- 
versity Hospital dispensaries. In the latter institution the 
Maryland State Department of Health conducts a venereal- 
disease clinic, in which 20,133 visits were paid last year. Every 
variety of venereal disease is here incountered, and this rich 
wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. In addi- 
tion to this, a cystocopic clinic is conducted in another part of 
the dispensary, where the students are given practical instruc- 
tion in the modem diagnostic methods. 



DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Monte Edwards, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. 6 hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum 
and anus, and will cover the essential features of the anatomy 
and physiology of the large intestine as well as the various dis- 
eases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum. 

The class is divided into sections for clinical instruction in 
the Baltimore City Hospital. Dr. Linthicum. 

Fourth Year. Ward and Dispensary instruction is given 
in the University and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases 
of the various diseases are taught by direct observation and 
examination. The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope 
and examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar 
to each student. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Blake and Rosenthal. 
University Hospital — Drs. Linthicum and Reeder. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 59 

BRONCHOSCOPY AND ESOPHAGOSCOPY 

WAITMAN F. Zinn, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

1. Clinical Lectures and Demonstrations once weekly at 
University and Mercy Hospitals. 

Etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis and prohylaxis of for- 
eign bodies in the air and food passages. Bronchoscopy as an 
aid in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs. 
Bronchoscopy as an aid to the surgeon. Diseases of the trachea. 
Diseases of the esophagus. All the phases of these subjects 
that the general practitioner should know are demonstrated 
clinically. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

George W. Dobbin, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

J. McF. Bergland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D._ Instructor in Obstetrics 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

M. A. NovEY, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. J. Erwin, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Isadore H. Siegel, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by 
Drs. Dobbin, Bergland, Novak, Murray, Douglass and Row- 
land to entire class. Manikin Work, Drs. Brack, Smith and 
Erwin to sections of class at Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Doug- 
lass, Reese, Bowe, Novey and Rowland at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week. 
Drs. Rowland, Douglass, Murray and Lazenby. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sec- 
tions of class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese, 
Bowe, Novey and Rowland at University Hospital. 



60 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Geo. a. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo. Brady, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Work, A course of thirty lectures 
and recitations. 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in 
the ward, makes a general physical examination, including the 
blood and urine, before the patient is brought before the class. 
One student under supervision gives the anaesthetic, a pelvic 
examination is made by six students, and any operation re- 
quired is then done before a section of the class small enough 
to see clearly what is being done and how it is done. On a sub- 
sequent day the whole group examine microscopically sections 
prepared from material removed from patients that have been 
before them. 



DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Prof, of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D Clinical Professor of Otology 

M. Randolph Zahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. First semester, Course in Diseases of the Eye. 
September 28th to January 23rd. Dr. Randolph Kahn. 

Course in Diseases of the Ear, second semester. Dr. Dow- 
ney. 

Practical Course in Ophthalmoscopy, once weekly, in sec- 
tions. Dr. Kemler. 

Fourth Year. Clinics in Diseases of the Eye and Ear, 
weekly. Drs. Harry Friedenwald and Downey. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 61 

Ward Studies of ocular and aural lesions associated with 
general medical diseases, once weekly in sections. Dr. Fried- 
enwald. 

Dispensary Instruction, daily to small sections. Drs. Dow- 
ney, Kahn, Fleck and Kemler. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are designed to 
familiarize the students with the common diseases of the eye 
and ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view to meet 
the needs of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is laid 
upon the relation between diseases of the eye and the ear and 
systematic diseases and diseases of other organs. 

THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of the History of Medicine 

The general lectures on the History of Medicine which were 
given last year and which ended with Vessalius and the revival 
of learning will be continued at dates and hours to be an- 
nounced later. The lectures this year will cover the 17th, 18th 
and part of the 19th Century. They will be illustrated, as 
heretofore, by lantern slides made especially for the lectures 
and by the showing of all important books connected with the 
subjects mentioned by the Lecturer. It is also proposed to 
form, if possible, a small group of students who will be wilhng 
to give an hour a week to a deeper study of some period in the 
History of Medicine, probably the Middle Ages. It is hoped 
that this group, if formed, may be able to meet in one of the 
rooms of the Medical and Chirurgical Library, where the mem- 
bers of the group can be brought into immediate contact with 
all the literature available for the period to be studied. This 
group will, therefore, constitute a sort of pre-seminary and will 
be open only to men who have attended the lectures already 
given. The time and the place of meeting of this group will 
be determined upon after the group itself has been formed. 



62 



SCHEDULE 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester, 1927-1928 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 
9 to 10 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Elmbryology 

P. & S. 32 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 




10 to 11 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Anatomy 

Laboratory 
&C.H. 


11 to 
12.00 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




12 M. 

to 
1P.M. 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




1 to 1.30 


Lunch 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Lunch 




1.30 to 2 


Anatomy 

C.H.,A.H.,& 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 

A. H., & 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 

C.H.,A.H., & 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 

C.H.,A.H.,& 

Laboratory 




2 to 4.30 


Anatomy 

C. H.p A. H., & 

Laboratory 




4.30 to 5 













FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester, 1927-1928 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Histology & 
Embryology 

P. & S. 32 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 




9.30 to 
10.30 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Anatomy 

Laboratory 
&C.H. 


10.30 to 
11.30 


Transfer 




11.30 to 
12.30 P. M. 


V^ttli 


Limch and 
Transfer 


Physiology 




12.30 to 1 


Lunch 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1 to 1.30 


Biology 

Chemistry 

A. H. 




1.30 to 2 


♦Anatomy 

C. H.. A. H., & 

Laboratory 


Anatomy 

A. H.. & 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 

C.H..A.H.,& 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 

C.H.,A.H.,& 

Laboratory 




2 to 4.30 


Anatomy 

C. H.,A. H., & 
Laboratory 




4.30 to 5 













A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall — Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 
* Neural Anatomy after April 9, 1928. 



SCHEDULE 



63 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE—First Semester, 1927-1928 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 
9 to 10 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 




10 to 11 


Physiology 


Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 

Pharmacology 

A. H. 


Pharmacology 
C.H. 


Physiology 
A. H. 


11 to 12 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Section B 


PaU.oIogy 


Pharmacology 


12 M. to 
12.30 P. M. 


Lunch 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Surgery 
C.H. 


^S:S! 




P. M. 

12.30 to 1 


Laboratory 

Immunology 
& Serology 

P. & S. 32 


Laboratory 

Immunology 
& Serology 

P. & S. 32 




1 to 1.30 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 


Lunch and 
Transfer 


Lunch and 
Transfer 




1.30 to 
2.30 


Medicine 
P. & S. 33 


Immunology 
& Serology 
P. & S. 34 




2.30 to 
3.30 


Laboratory 
& P. & S. 33 

Surgical 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
& P. & S. 33 

Surgical 
Anatomy 




3.30 to 4 


Laboratory 
P. &S. 

Surgical 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
P. &S. 

Surgical 
Anatomy 




4 to 5.30 







SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE—Second Semester, 1927-1928 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Phvsiolocy 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 


Biolojrical 

Chemistry 

C.H. 




9.30 to 


Physiology 


Biology 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Pharmacology 
C.H. 




10.30 


Physiology 


10.30 to 
11 30 


Pathology 
C.H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
Section B 


Patholojry 
C.H. 


A. H.^"^ 






11.30 to 
12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


P. M. 

12 to 1 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Medical Clinic 
Amp. 


1 to 2 




2 to 3 

3 to 4 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Univ. Kosp. 
Disp. 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Section B 




4 to 5 







A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall — Lower Hall, N. E. Cor, Lombard emd Greene Streets. 
Laboratories: 

Biological Chemistry — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Pathology — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombsurd and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets, 
P. & S. — In. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Srteets. Rooms indicated on Second and Fourth Floors. 



64 



SCHEDULE 

THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday ; Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Therapeutics 
A. H. 


Pathology 1 Medicine Surgery 
C. H. C. H. C. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics ] Surgery Obstetrics Medicine 
A. H. j C. H. C. H. ' C, H. 


Medicine 
A. H. 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


10.30 to 
1 P. M. 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 

Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 

Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch 


1 to 2 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 33 


Gynecology 
P. & S. 34 


1.15 to 4.15 

Clinical 
Pathology 
Laboratory 

P. & S. 32 


Transfer 


2.15 to 
3.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


i 2.30-4.30 

Section A 

CUnical 

Pathology I Medicine 

Laboratory i Surgery 

' Gross 

Pathology 

j at Bay View 

i 


*2 to 3.15 
Eye 

P. & S. 34 


2-4 
Section B 
Clinical 
Medicine 


3.15 to 
4.15 


Clinical 
Pathology 

P. & S. 34 


Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


4.15 
to 
5.15 


Pediatrics 
A. H. 


2.15-4.15 
Section B 
* Obstetrics Group Work 
C. H. OphthalmoB- 

** Ear ; """^^ 

1 Practical 

^' ' i Obstetrics 
j Univ. Hosp. 


Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 
Medicine 

Mental 
Hygiene 

P. & S. 34 


Preventive 
Medicine 

P. & S. 34 




From 10 
and Sarato 
C. H.— C 
A. H.— A 
Amp. — A 
P. & S.- 
At the be 
Hospital on 
* First S 
*♦ Seconc 


30 A. M. to 1.0 
?a Streets, the o 
hemical HaU— ^ 
natomical Hall— 
mphitheatre — U 
-N. W. Cor. Cal 
ginning of the se 

Wednesdays, 2. 
>emester. 

Semester. 


P. M. the cla 
ther at Lombar 
[. E. Cor. Lomb 
-N. E. Cor. Lon 
niversity Hospit 
^ert and Saratov 
■cond semester S 
15-4.15 P. M.; 


ss is divided int 
i and Greene St 
ard and Greene 
ibard and Green 
al, S. W. Cor. L< 
'a Streets. Roo 
ection "A" at B 
section "B" at E 


o two sections, 
reets. 
Streets. 
e Streets. 
Dmbsird £md Gre 
ms indicated on 
ay View on Satu 
ay View on We 


one section repo 

ene Streets. 
Second Floor, 
rdays, 2-4 P. M. 
dnesdays, 2.30-4 


rting at Calvert 

, and University 
30 P. M. 



SCHEDULE 



65 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A M. 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


8.30 to 
11.00 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 




11.00 


Orthopaedic 
Surgery 


Medical 

Clinic 

Univ. Sec. 


Clinical 
Pathological 
Conference 


Surgical 
Clinic 


Medical 
Clinic 


Pediatrics 
Clinic 


to 


Univ. Sec. 


Amp. 




Univ. Sec. 




Univ. Sec. 


12.00 


Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Surgical 

Pathology 

P. & S. Sec. 40 


Univ. Sec. 

C. H. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Univ. Sec. 

Amp. 

P. & S. Sec. 33 


Amp. 
P. &S. Sec. 33 


P. M. 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 






Lunch and 


and 


Lu 


and 


Lunch and 


Dispensary 


12 to 2 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 






Dermatology 


Neurology 


Eye and Ear 


Obstetrical 


Gaistro-Enter- 




2.15 


Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


ology Clinic 


Genito- 
urinary 


to 


(FuU Class at 


Univ. Sec. 


(Full Class at 


(FuU Class at 


(FuU Class at 


CUnic 


3.15 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Amp. 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


P. & S. Sec. 51 




Amp. 


P. & S. Sec. 33 


Amp. 


Amp. 


Amp. 






P. & S. Sec. 




P. & S. Sec. 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 




3.30 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Medicine 


Orthopaedic 




to 


Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Medicine 


Nose & Throat 


Surgery 




5.00 


Urology 
Eye and Ear 


Proctology 


Roentgenology 










Radiotheraphy 


Preventive 


Physical 


Neurology 








Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Psychiatry 










Univ. Sec. 


5 to 6 P. M. 








Univ. Sec. 




Ward Classes 


March, 






3.30 


Ward Classes 






April and 












Medicine 


May 






5.00 


Medicine 
Urology 




Roentgenology 
Eye and Ear 


History of 

Medicine 

C.H. 







The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Streets, the other 
at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups— Medical, Surgical, and Special. These groups will 
rotate on the foUowing dates: 



FIRST SEMESTER 
1st period, Sept. 26— Oct. 29. 
2nd period, Oct. 31— Dec. 3. 
3rd period, Dec. 5 — Jan. 21. 



SECOND SEMESTER 
Ist period, Jan. 23 — Feb. 25. 
2nd period, Feb. 27 — April 8. 
3rd period, AprU 10 — May 13. 



I C. H.— Chemical HaU— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 

P. & S., 33, 34— Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
_ P. & S., 40, 51— Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets, 



66 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Med- 
ical Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Regis- 
trar on the basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and 
is essential for admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical 
Student Certificate are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school 
course or the equivalent, and, in addition, at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits, 
including chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this Uni- 
versity. 

(A) HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation from an accredited high or preparatory school, 
after pursuing a four-year course based upon an eight-year 
elementary course, or its full equivalent as demonstrated by 
entrance examinations. 

At least fifteen units must be offered J. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED OR ACCEPTED 

FOR ENTRANCE TO THE PREMEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Subjects Units* Required 

Group I, English— (I— II^III— IV) — 

Literature and Composition 3 3 

Group II, Foreign Languages — 

Latin 2-4] 

Greek 2-3 1 2f 

French or German 2-4 1 

Other foreign languages 2-4J 

Group III, Mathematics — 

Elementary algebra 1 1 

Advanced algebra V2-I 

Plane geometry 1 1 

Solid geometry V2 

Trigonometry V2 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 67 

Group IV, History— 

Ancient history 1' 

Medieval and modern history 1 

English history l[- 1 

American history ^-1 

Civil government V2-I 

Group V, Science — 

Botany h^-f 

Zoology ^-1 

Physics ll 1 

Physiography %-l ' 

Physiology %-l 

Astronomy V2 

Geology V2-I 

Group VI, Miscellaneous — 

Agriculture 1-2 

Bookkeeping %-l 

Business law ^ 

Commercial geography ^-1 

Domestic science 1-2 

Drawing, freehand and mechanical %-2 

Economics and economic history ^/^-l 

Manual training 1-2 

Music: Appreciation or harmony 1-2 

*A unit is the credit value of at least thirty-six weeks' work of four 
or five recitation periods per week, each recitation period to be not less 
than forty minutes. In other words, a unit represents a year's study in 
any subject in a secondary school constituting approximately a quarter 
of a full year's work. A satisfactory year's work in any subject cannot 
be accomplished under ordinary circumstances in less than 120 sixty- 
minute hours, or their equivalent. 

fBoth of the required units of foreign language must be of the same 
language, but the two units may be presented in any one of the languages 
specified. 

J Of the fifteen units of high school work, nine units are required, as 
indicated in the foregoing schedule; the remainder may be made up from 
any of the other subjects in the schedule, provided that at least eleven 
units must be offered in Group I-V. 

(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two 
college sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual 
instruction, including final examinations. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this 
preliminary college course shall be equal to the work done in 



68 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

the freshman and sophomore years in standard colleges and 
universities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in 
physics, chemistry, biology and English, each course to em- 
brace at least six, eight or twelve hours of work in each sub- 
ject, as shown in the schedule following: 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 

PREMEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Semester 
Required Courses : Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 
A modern foreign language 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy 
Psychology 
Social science 
A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting 
of one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less 
than fifty minutes' duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work to 
be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required of 
which at least eight semester hours must be in general inor- 
ganic chemistry, including four semester hours of laboratory 
work, and four semester hours in organic chemistry, including 
two semester hours of laboratory work. In the interpretation 
of this rule, work in qualitative analysis may be counted as 
general inorganic chemistry. 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which 
at least two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes 
a knowledge of plane trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which 
four must be laboratory work. This requirement may be satis- 
fied by a course of eight semester hours in either general 
biology or zoology, or by courses of four semester hours each 
in zoology and botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual 
introductory college course of six semester hours, or its equiva- 
lent, is required. 



RULES AND FEES 69 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum is offered, leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. 
The first three years are taken in residence at College Park, 
and the last four years in Baltimore, at the School of Medicine. 
The premedical curriculum constitutes the first two years' 
work, and the third year follows a general outline of prescribed 
and elective courses approved by the chairman of the pre- 
medical committee and the dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School 
of Medicine, and upon the recommendation of the dean, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at College Park. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this 
combination course offers over the minimum requirements of 
the two years. By completing three years the training may 
be gradually broadened by a wider latitude in the election of 
courses in the arts subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior 
year without being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, 
without examination, may receive a certificate of attendance 
on completing the full course satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth-year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine are the same as those enforced against undergradu- 
ates admitted to advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses — In the April number of 
the Bulletin detailed announcement will be made of the Post- 
graduate Summer Courses. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the 
course, he must pay regular fees. 



70 RULES AND FEES 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at 
the end of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire 
course of the fourth year and to take examination in such other 
branches as may be required should he again be permitted to 
enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be 
taken into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results 
of his examination. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland are required to provide themselves with 
microscopes of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, 
Spencer Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attach- 
ments, will fill the requirements : 

Triple nose piece 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives 

Quick screw condenser (Abbe) 1.9mm. 1.25 N.A. Oil Immersion 

Lens 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate 
to the year ending June 2, 1928, only. The right is reserved 
to make changes in the curriculum, the requirements for grad- 
uation, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever the 
Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 300.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 400.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 20.00 

Special and re-examination fee 5.00 

Graduation fee 10.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution in any class for the session beginning September 
26th, 1927. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to reg- 
ister at the Registrar's Office. The last date of registration is 
October 3rd, 1927. 



RULES AND FEES 71 

Matriculation, laboratory and tuition fees for the first sem- 
ester shall be paid at the time of registration, and for the sec- 
ond semester on or before February 4th, 1928. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar the 
student from attendance on classes and other privileges of the 
University. 

Students who fail to pay the tuition and other fees on or 
before the last day of registration for each term or semester, 
as stated in the catalogue, will be required to pay as an addi- 
tion to the fees required the sum of Five ($5.00) Dollars, and 
if the payment so required shall not be paid before twenty (20) 
days from the beginning of said term or semester, the stu- 
dent's name shall be stricken from the rolls. 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident stu- 
dents, if at the time of their registration their parents or 
guardians have been residents of this state for at least one 
3^ear. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at 
the time of their first registration they have been residents 
of this state for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the 
time of his first registration in the University, and miay not 
thereafter be changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, 
his parents or guardians move to and become legal residents 
of this state. 



72 PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIP 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the 
highest average during the four years of his course. Certifi- 
cates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates standing 
next highest. 

DR. JOSE L. HIRSH MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of ?50.00 is given each year by Mrs. David Myers as 
a memorial to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsh, formerly Professor 
of Pathology in this School, to the student in the third year 
who has done the most satisfactory work in Pathology during 
his second and third years. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an 
alumnus of this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University each year upon nomination by the Medical Coun- 
cil "to a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in 
the judgment of said Faculty, is of good character and in need 
of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student who has successfully completed one year's work in this 
school, and no student may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 

(Value, $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the 
School of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an 
alumnus of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of 
the Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by 



L 



SCHOLARSHIPS 73 

the Medical Council to students who have meritoriously com- 
pleted the work of at least the first year of the course in medi- 
cine, and who present to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of 
a good moral character and of inability to continue the course 
without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph W^inslow Scholarship 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Wins- 
low, M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Coun- 
cil, to a "needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore 
Class of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all 
his work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship 

(Value, $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Kar- 
linsky as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlin- 
sky, an alumnus of this University. 

The scholarship is awarded to a second-year student who at 
the end of the first year passes the best examination in Anat- 
omy, Histology, Embryology and Bacteriology. 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University. One to a 
student of the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the 
President, to be held for only one year; the other, which en- 
titles the holder to exemption from payment of the tuition fee 
of the year, is awarded annually by the Medical Council to a 
student of the Senior Class who presents to the Medical Coun- 
cil satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and 
is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 



74 SCHOLARSHIPS 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late 
Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entiles the holder to exemption 
from payment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to 
a third-year student who at the end of the second year passes 
the best practical examination in Anatomy, Physiology, Bio- 
logical Chemistry, Pharmacology, Pathology, Immunology and 
Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 

(Valuation, $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from 
the income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence 
Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships will be available 
to students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. 
Preference is given to students from the counties of the State 
of Maryland which the Medical Council may from time to time 
determine to be most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, after 
graduation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the 
practice of medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to 
which the student is accredited or in a county selected by the 
Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with 
the condition requiring him to practice in the county to which 
he is accredited by the Council, the money advanced by the 
Regents shall be refunded. A bond in the amount of $1,200, 
the expense of which is borne by the Fund, must be filed by 
the student accepting one of these scholarships for faithful 
performance of the conditions imposed. 

Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen Scholarship 
(Value, $250.00) 
This scholarship was estabhshed by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen 
in memory of her parents, Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen. Terms 
and conditions : 

This scholarship will be available to students of any one of 
the classes of the course in Medicine; preference is given to 
students of the counties of the State of Maryland which the 



SCHOLARSHIPS — APPOINTMENTS 75 

Medical Council may from time to time determine to be most 
in need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving one of 
these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interne- 
ship, agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of 
two years in the county to which the student is accredited, or 
in a county selected by the Council. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

On February 1st of each session the following annual ap- 
pointments are made from among the graduates of the school : 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons Two Resident Obstetricians 

Two Resident Physicians Thirteen Junior Residents on a 

One Resident Gynecologist Rotating Service 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close 
of the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital 
for the summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician One Resident Gynecologist 

One Assistant Resident Physician One Resident Obstetrician 

Chief Resident Surgeon Eight Junior Residents on a Rotat- 

Five Assistant Resident Surgeons ing Service 



76 NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in 
Baltimore as in any large city in the United States. The fol- 
lowing estimates of a student's personal expenses for the aca- 
demic year of eight months have been prepared by students, 
and are based upon actual experience: 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 75 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the 
city by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University 
grounds, N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where 
the Secretary of Student Y. M. C. A., who may be found at his 
office on the premises, will furnish them with a list of com- 
fortable and convenient boarding-houses suitable to their 
means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks 
and drafts for students. 

For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



MATRICULATES 1926-27 



77 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 

OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, 1926-1927 



FOURTH-YEAR CLASS 



Adzima, Joseph Matthew Connecticut 

Aptaker, Albert Jack New York 

Armacost, Joshua Harper Mai'yland 

Ball, Claude Russell, B.S West Virginia 

Bankhead, John Marion, B.S. 

South Carolina 

Basil, George Chester, Ph.G Maryland 

Belsky, Hyman New York 

Benesunes, Joseph George, A.B, Maryland 

Bialostosky, Julius, B.S New York 

Birnbaum, Joseph Osias New York 

Cadden, John Francis, Jr West Virginia 

Carey, Thomas Nelson Maryland 

Chase, William Wiley, A.B Maryland 

Cohen, Bernard Julius, Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Morris Daniel New York 

Condry, Raphael Joseph, B.S._West Virginia 

Covington, Elijah Eugene North Cai'olina 

Davis, Henry Vincent Maryland 

Donchi, Sol Mai-vin, B.S New Jersey 

Eliason, Harold William West Virginia 

Feldman, Jacob New York 

Fidler, Kemp Ardvern, B.S. West Virginia 

Finkelstein, Abraham Harry New York 

Friedman, Meyer Henry New Jersey 

Garner, Wade Hampton, B.S Alabama 

Cellar, Abraham, B.S New York 

Gill, Charles Edward Delaware 

Gillis, Francis Winfred Maryland 

Ginsberg, Henry Maryland 

Click, Bernard New Jersey 

Goldberg, Isidore New Jersey 

Goldstein, Milton Joseph New York 

Heisley, Rowland S Maryland 

Hewitt, John Frank, A.B Maryland 

Hoke, Dwight Moody, B.S West Virginia 

Hummel, Ira Lee Cottrell New Jersey 

Johnson, Jesse Raymond, B.S. 

West Virginia 

Kahan, Philip J New York 

Karns, Clyde Filmore, B.S Maryland 

Kayser, Fayne Albert, B.S West Virginia 

Klawans, Maurice Francis Maryland 

Kutner, Charles New Jersey 

Lassman, Samuel, B.S New York 

Lazow, Sol M New York 

* Deceased. 

tDid not complete year. 



Lenson, Byruth King Maryland 

Leyko, Julius Joseph, A. B Maryland 

Lilly, Goff Piatt West Virginia 

Mattikow, Bernard, B.S New York 

Milhoan, Asa Wade, B.S West Virginia 

Misenheimer, Edd Alexander-North Carolina 

Moran, John Edward, Ph.G Massachusetts 

Morris, Francis Kailer, A.B Maryland 

Nussbaum, Samuel New York 

Peake, Clarence William Kentucky 

Phillips, John Roberts, A.B Maryland 

Rtifschneider, Herbert Eilert, A.B. 

Maryland 

Saffell, James Glenn Maryland 

*Schnierer, Samuel Benjamin New York 

Schwedel, John Bernard Maryland 

Sparta, Anthony Joseph Pennsylvania 

Staton, Hilliard Vincent North Carolina 

Stonesifer, Charles Hiram, A.B Maryland 

Strayer, Helen Clymer, A.B Maryland 

Swank, James Levy, B.S Pennsylvania 

Swartzwelder, Wallace Ray Pennsylvania 

Talbot Henry Pierce Alabama 

Tayloe, Gordon Bennett, A.B. 

North Carolina 

Teague, Francis Bailey Virginia 

Thompson, Thomas Payne, A.B Maryland 

Tollin, Louis New Jersey 

Totterdale, William Grainger, A.B. 

Maryland 

Tumminello, Salvatore Anthony Maryland 

Upton, Hiram Eugene, B.S Vermont 

Voigt, Herman Albert, Ph.G Maryland 

Von Schulz, Augustine Paul Maryland 

Wack, Frederic Van Deursen, B.S. 

New Jersey 
Waesche, Frederick Seton, A.B. — Maryland 
Whittington, Claude Thomas 

North Carolina 
Williams, Palmer Francis C, B.S. 

Maryland 

Wilner, Joseph Walter New York 

Wollak, Theodore Maryland 

fYarbrough, Oscar D. Alabama 

Zinn, Ralph Howai'd, B.S West Virginia 



78 



MATRICULATES 1926-27 



THIRD-YEAR CLASS, 1926-1927 



Baer, Adolph New York 

Bailey, Hugh Alvin, A.B South Carolina 

Bedri, Marcel Rechtman Palestine 

Berger, William Adolph, B.S. — New Jersey 

Bernhard, Robert New York 

Blecherman, Irving Ezra New York 

Bonelli, Nicholas William New Jersey 

Brager, Simon Maryland 

Chor, Herman, A.B Maryland 

Christian, William Pennsylvania 

Clemson, Earle Princeton Maryland 

Duckwall, Frederick Mooman-West Virginia 
Duncan, George Andrew, B.S. -West Virginia 

Friedman, Bernard New York 

Garred, Herbert William, B.S. 

West Virginia 

Gelber, Jacob Saul Rhode Island 

George, Jessie Ethelwyn, B.S. .West Virginia 

Goldberg, Victor, Ph.G Maryland 

Goodman, Jerome Edward, Ph.G. -Maryland 

Greer, Creed Collins, B.S West Virginia 

Grolhnan, Aaron Isaac, B.S Maryland 

Gulck, George Krohn, B.S Denmark 

Gundry, Lewis Perkins, A.B Maryland 

Hankin, Samuel Jacob Maryland 

Hayes, Paul Maryland 

Herold, Lewis Jacob, Ph.G New York 

Johnson, Walter Brenaman, A.B. -Maryland 

Jones, Henry Alvan, Ph.G Maryland 

Kaminsky, Philip New York 

Kaufman, Israel, B.S New York 

Kohn, Theodore, B.S South Carolina 

Lampert, Hyman New York 

Lamstein, Jacob Irving, B.S New York 

Laukaitis, Joseph George Maryland 

Lerner, Morris New York 

Levinsky, Maurice Connecticut 

Levinson, Louis Jack New York 

Levy, Walter Howard New York 

Limbach, Earl Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Litsinger, Edward Andi-ew, B.S. 

West Virginia 
Little, Luther Emmanuel, Ph.G. — Maryland 

Littman, Irving Isaac Maryland 

Lyon, Isadore Bernard, A.B Maryland 

Mace, John, Jr., B.S Maryland 

Maddi, Vincent Michael, A.B New York 

Maged, Alan John, A.B New York 

McCenney, Robert Sadler, A.B Maryland 

McDowell, Roy Hendi'ix, A.B. 

North Carolina 



McFaul, William Neal, Jr., A.B. Maryland 
McGee, William Buster, B.S. -West Virginia 
Mee, Robert Amos, A.B., B.S. 

New Hampshire 

Meister, Aaron New York 

Merksamer, David, A.B New York 

Merlino, Frank Anthony New Jersey 

Messina, Vincent Michael Maryland 

Mostwill, Ralph New Jersey 

Neuman, Finley Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Piacentine, Pasquale Anthony New York 

Pileggi, Peter New Jersey 

Rascoff, Henry New York 

Rich, Benjamin Sunderland, A.B. -Maryland 

Roetling, Carl Paul Maryland 

Rosen, Marks Julius New York 

P.ubenstein, Hyman Solomon, Ph.G. 

Maryland 

Rutter, Joseph Howard Florida 

Saffron, Morris Harold, A.B New Jersey 

Sardo, Samuel Philip, B.S Pennsylvania 

Shaw, Cecil Cm-ry, A. B Alabama 

Silver, Abraham Alfred Connecticut 

Singer, Jack Jerome Maryland 

Smoot, Aubrey Cannon, A.B Maryland 

Smoot, Merrill Clayville, B.S Maryland 

Stacy, Theodore Edwin, Jr., Ph.G. 

Pennsylvania 

Tannenbaum, Morris, B.S New York 

Taylor, Charles Vivian, A.B Maryland 

Temple, Levi Wade, Jr., B.S. 

South Carolina 

Tenner, David, Ph.G. Maryland 

Tkach, Nathan Hersh New York 

Varney, William Henry Maryland 

Vernaglia, Anthony Paul Joseph-New York 

Vogel, S. Zachary New York 

Volenick, Leo Joseph New York 

*'Walter, Frank Pierce Maryland 

Warner, Carroll Gai'dner, A.B Maryland 

Weintraub, Fred Siegfried, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Weisenfeld, Nathan, B.S Connecticut 

Weiss, Aaron New York 

Wells, Samuel Robert, B.S — West Virginia 
Willcerson, Albert Russell, Ph.G.__Maryland 

Wolf, Frederick Samuel Maryland 

Wurzel, Milton New Jersey 

Zimmerman, Frederick Thomas, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 
*Deceased. 



MATRICULATES 1926-27 



79 



SECOND-YEAR CLASS, 1926-1927 



Abramowitz, Max, B.S New York 

Ackerman. Jacob Harold, A.B — New York 
Alessi, Silvio A., Ph.G Maryland 

Anderson, Walter Anders, D.D.S., Ph.G. 

Maryland 

Bardfeld. Benjamin New Jersey 

Barland. Samuel, Jr., B.S New York 

Benson, Alvan Homer Maryland 

Birely, Morris Franklin, A.B Maryland 

Bongiorno, Henry Domenic, Ph.G. 

New Jersey 

Botsch, Bernard, B.S Ohio 

Bowen, James Poore, B.S South Carolina 

Brauer, Selig Leo New Jersey 

Galas, Andres Eladio Cuba 

Chambers, Earl LeRoy Maryland 

Chapman, William Hardee Maryland 

Ciccone, Arnold William Rhode Island 

Cohen, Herman New Jersey 

Cohen, Jacob Harry, A.B Maryland 

Cohen, Paul Henry, A.B Maryland 

Coppola, Matthew Joseph, B.S. — New York 

Corsello, Joseph Nicholas, B.S New York 

Dailey, William Paul Pennsylvania 

DeBarbieri, Fred Louis, A.B — Pennsylvania 

Draper, William Bateman Maryland 

Farbman, Meyer David, B.S New York 

Fargo, William Russell, A.B Maryland 

Fatt, Henry Charles, B.S New Jersey 

Feingold, Charles, B.S New York 

Feit, Emanuel, B.S New York 

Fifer, Jesse Showalter, A.B Delaware 

Fiocco, Vincent James, B.S New York 

Garber, Jacob S New York 

Givner, David, A.B Maryland 

Gouldman, Edwin Foster, B.S Virginia 

Guiglia, Sascha Facchetti New York 

Haney, John James New Jersey 

Heck, Leroy Savin, B.S., Ph.G Maryland 

Horowitz, Morris, A.B Massachusetts 

Husted, Samuel Harley New Jersey 

Jackson, Murray Elliot, B.S New York 

Jacobs, Abraham, B.S New York 

Kelly, Clyde Ernest, A.B Pennsylvania 

Kirschner, Abe Edward, A.B New York 

Knight, Walter Philip Pennsylvania 

Levi, Ernest, Ph.G Maryland 



Lukesh, Stephen Michael Pennsylvania 

Lynn, Irving, B.S New Jersey 

Lynn, John Galloway 3rd, B.S Maryland 

McAndrew, Joseph Theodore-West Virginia 

McGowan, Joseph Francis Pennsylvania 

Matsumura, Junichi Hawaii 

Meranski, Israel, B.S Connecticut 

Morgan, Isaac J Pennsylvania 

Murphy, John Edward Pennsylvania 

Neistadt. Isidore Irving, A.B Maryland 

Newman, Saul Charles, B.S Connecticut 

Nickman, Emanuel Harrison — New Jersey 

O'Dea, John Francis, A.B New York 

Osborn, Adam Downey New Jersey 

Overton, Lewis Marvin, A.B. 

North Carolina 
Penchansky, Samuel Joseph, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Porterfield, Maurice Coleman Maryland 

Prager, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Quinn, Thomas Francis Pennsylvania 

Reeder, Paul Arlington, B.S. -West Virginia 

Reilly, John Vincent New Jersey 

Roberts, Eldred, B.S Maryland 

Safer, Jake Victor Florida 

Safford, Henry Towne, Jr Texas 

Schreiber, Morris Bernard New York 

Schwartzbach, Saul, A.B New York 

Seibel, Jack, B.S New York 

Sekerak, Raymond Andrew Connecticut 

Serra, Lawrence Mario, Ph.G Maryland 

Sikorsky, Albert Edward, A.B Maryland 

Silver, Mabel Irene, B.S Maryland 

Soifer, Albert Alexander, B.S Maryland 

Solomon, Milton. B.S New York 

Speicher, Wilbur Glenn Maryland 

Spencer, Ernest Maryland 

Spurrier, Oliver Walter, A.B Maryland 

Staton, Leon Raphael, A.B. -North Carolina 

Stevenson, Charles Calvert Utah 

Sullivan, William Joseph Rhode Island 

Ullrich, Henry Franz Maryland 

Vann, Homer King Florida 

Wallack, Charles Albert, B.S New Jersey 

Ward, Hugh Walter, A.B Maryland 

Yudkoff, William. B.S New Jersey 



80 



MATRICULATES 1926-27 



FIRST- YEAR CLASS, 1926-1927 



Aiau, Chadwick Kanekoa Hawaii 

Alexander, Hattie Elizabeth, A.B._Maryland 

Anderson, Lucile Russell, A.B. Tennessee 

Aronofsky, Milton Robert, Ph.B. 

Connecticut 

Ashman, Harry, B.S New York 

Bamberger, Beatrice, A.B Maryland 

Baumgardner, George Martin Maryland 

Baumgartner, Eugene Irving Maryland 

Baylus, Meyer Milby, Ph.G. Maryland 

Belinkin, William, B.S New York 

Benfer, Kenneth Louis, A.B. Maryland 

Berkowitz, Rudolph New York 

Berman, Henry Irving Maryland 

Blum, Joseph Sydney, Ph.G Maryland 

*Brannan, Francis Carroll, B.S.—Maryland 

Brayshaw, Thomas Henry Maryland 

Burns, John Howard Maryland 

♦Cerilli, Guido James, Ph.B Rhode Island 

Cheritz, William, B.S New Jersey 

♦Clayman, David Stanford, Ph.G._Maryland 

Cohen, Archie Robert, Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Irvin Joseph, Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Max Hurston, Ph.G Maryland 

♦Cohen, Paul, A.B. New Jersey 

Demarco, Salvatore Joseph, A.B. .Maryland 
Di Paula, Robert Salvatore, A.B. .Maryland 

Donohue, Bernard Walker, A.B Maryland 

Durrett, Clay Earl, B.S Maryland 

Faw, Wylie Melvin, Jr Maryland 

Feman, Jacob George, A.B New York 

Fisher, Samuel New Jersey 

Flescher, Julius, Ph.G. Maryland 

♦Friedman, Reuben Abe Maryland 

♦Fuhrman, William Nelson Maryland 

Garey, James Lyman Pennsylvania 

Garfinkel. Abraham, B.S New York 

Gerner, Harry Ezekiel, B.S New Jersey 

Gersten, Paul Francis New York 

Ginsberg, Leon, Ph.D., M.A., A.B. 

New York 

(Joldman, Lester Milton, B.S. New Jersey 

Goldstein, Jacob Everett, B.S New York 

Goodman, Julius Henry, Ph.G. Maryland 

Grove, Donald Birtner Maryland 

Hildenbrand, Emil John Christopher, B.S. 
Maryland 

Hornbaker, John Harlan Maryland 

Hudson, Rollin Carl, A.B Maryland 

Jaklitsch, Frank Henry, B.S New York 

Johnson, Marius Pitkin Connecticut 

Kaufman, Max, Ph.G New York 

Kermisch, Albert, Ph.G Maryland 

Kleinman, Abraham Morris, B.S. .New York 

Kovarsky, Albert Ellas, A.B New Jersey 

Kraemer, Samuel Harry, B.S. New Jersey 

Kremen, Abraham, A.B Maryland 

Kuhn, Esther Frances, A.B Maryland 

Lang, Abraham, B.S. New York 

Levin, Morton Loeb, Ph.G. Maryland 



Levy, Solomon, A.B Palestine 

Lewandoski, Henry Charles Maryland 

Lewis, Frank Russell Maryland 

♦McDonald, Thomas Kenneth, B.S. 

Maryland 
McDowell, Harold Clyde, B.S. 

North Carolina 

McElwee, Miirray James Pennsylvania 

McGreevy, Joan Frances 

District of Colimibia 

Magovern, Thomas Francis New Jersey 

Mansdorfer, George Bowers, B.S. .Maryland 
♦Marianetti, Amerigo Lawrence 

Rhode Island 

Mednick, Benjamin William New York 

Miller, Benjamin Herman, A.B. ..Maryland 

Miller, Isaac New Jersey 

Miller, James Alton Maryland 

Montilla, Victor Jose Porto Rico 

Mortimer, Egbert Laird, Jr Maryland 

Needle, Nathan E Maryland 

Nocera, Francisco Paolo, Jr Porto Rico 

Palmer, Thomas Valentine__North Carolina 

Perhnan, Robert, B.S New York 

Post, Charles Gordon, Jr., A.B New York 

Powell, Joseph Lawrence Pennsylvania 

♦Rehmeyer, Walter Owen, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Reid, Francis Fielding, A.B Maryland 

Rigdon, Wilson O., B.S Maryland 

Rineberg, Irving Edward, B.S. .New Jersey 

♦Rohr, John Ambrose Pennsylvania 

Romano, Nicholas Michael Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Abner Herman, B.S. New York 

Rozvmi, John Charles New York 

Sanchez, Robert Louis, A.B New York 

Sasscer, Buchanan Beale Maryland 

Schimunek, Emmanuel Aloysius, A.B. 

Maryland 
Schnabel, William Thomas, Ph.G. -Maryland 

Sears, Joseph Everett, Ph.G Maryland 

♦Segal, Samuel Michael, A.B — Pennsylvania 

Shelley, Harry Sandberg, B.S Maryland 

Shill, Benjamin, A.B New Jersey 

Shuhnan, Louis Robert Maryland 

Smith, Joseph Jacob, A.B Connecticut 

Snoops, George John, Jr., A.B Maryland 

Snyder, Nathan, Ph.G Maryland 

Soltroflf, Jack Gerson, B.S Pennsylvania 

Sperling, Nathaniel Mortimer, B.S. 

New York 
♦Strezelecki, Edward Aloysius — New Jersey 

Topchik, Irving, Ph.G New Jersey 

♦Wattenmaker, Hymen, Ph.G. -Pennsylvania 

Weinstein, Jack, B.S New York 

Werner, Aaron Seth New York 

Young, Ralph Funk Maryland 

Zeigler, Samuel, B.S New York 

♦Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES 1926-27 81 



I 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SESSION OF 1926-1927 

College of Agriculture 123 

College of Arts and Sciences 516 

(Regular 506 

^Extension 10 

School of Dentistry 395 

College of Education 273 

( Regular 131 

|Extension 142 

College of Engineering 441 

(Regular 234 

(Extension 207 

Graduate School 96 

College of Home Economics 46 

School of Law 452 

School of Medicine 371 

School of Nursing 110 

School of Pharmacy 277 

Summer School, 1926, College Park 477 

Total 3,577 

Duplications 65 

Net Total 3,512 



82^ 



GRADUATES 



GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 

OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PRYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, JUNE 4, 1927 



Adzima, Joseph Matthew Connecticut 

Aptaker, Albert Jack New York 

Armacost, Joshua Harper Maryland 

Ball, Claude Russell. B.S West Virginia 

Bankhead, John Marion, B.S. 

South Carolina 

Basil, George Chester, Ph.G Maryland 

Belsky, Hyman New York 

Benesunes, Joseph George, A.B. Maryland 

Bialostosky, Julius, B.S New York 

Birnbaum, Joseph Osias New York 

Cadden, John Francis, Jr West Virginia 

Carey, Thomas Nelson Maryland 

Chase, William Wiley, A.B Maryland 

Cohen, Bernard Julius, Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Morris Daniel New York 

Condry, Raphael Joseph, B.S._West Virginia 

Covington, Elijah Eugene North Carolina 

Davis, Henry Vincent Maryland 

Donchi, Sol Marvin, B.S New Jersey 

Eliason, Harold William West Virginia 

Feldman, Jacob New York 

Fidler, Kemp Ardvern, B.S West Virginia 

Finkelstein, Abraham Harry New York 

Friedman, Meyer Henry New Jersey 

Garner, Wade Hampton, B.S Alabama 

Cellar, Abraham, B.S New York 

Gill, Charles Edward Delaware 

Gillis, Francis Winfred Maryland 

Ginsberg, Henry Maryland 

Click, Bernard New Jersey 

Goldberg, Isidore New Jersey 

Goldstein, Milton Joseph New York 

Heisley, Rowland S Maryland 

Hewitt, John Frank, A.B Maryland 

Hoke, Dwight Moody, B.S. West Virginia 

Hummel, Ira Lee Cottrell New Jersey 

Johnson, Jesse Raymond, B.S. 

West Virginia 

Kahan, Philip J New York 

Earns, Clyde Filmore, B.S Maryland 

Kayser, Fayne Albert, B.S.—West Virginia 
Klawans, Maurice Francis Maryland 



Kutner, Charles New Jersey 

Lassman, Samuel, B.S New York 

Lazow, Sol M New York 

Lenson, Byruth King Maryland 

Leyko, Julius Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lilly, Goflf Piatt West Virginia 

Mattikow, Bernard, B.S New York 

Milhoan, Asa Wade, B.S West Virginia 

Misenheimer, Edd Alexander-North Carolina 
Moran, John Edward, Ph.G.. -Massachusetts 

Morris, Francis Kailer, A.B Maryland 

Nussbaum, Samuel New York 

Peake, Clarence William Kentucky 

Phillips, John Roberts, A.B Maryland 

Reifschneider, Herbert Eilert, A.B. 

Maryland 

Safifell, James Glenn Maryland 

Schwedel, John Bernard Maryland 

Sparta, Anthony Joseph Pennsylvania 

Staton, Hilliard Vincent North Carolina 

Stonesifer Charles Hiram, A.B Maryland 

Strayer, Helen Clymer, A.B. Maryland 

Swank, James Levy, B.S Pennsylvania 

Swartzwelder, Wallace Ray Pennsylvania 

Talbot, Henry Pierce Alabama 

Tayloe, Gordon Bennett, A.B. 

North Carolina 

Teague, Francis Bailey Virginia 

Thompson, Thomas Payne, A.B Maryland 

Tollin, Louis New Jersey 

Totterdale, William Grainger, A.B. -Maryland 
T\miminello, Salvatore Anthony. -Maryland 

Upton, Hiram Eugene, B.S. Vermont 

Voigt, Herman Albert, Ph.G. Maryland 

Von Schulz, Augustine Paul Maryland 

Williams, Palmer Francis C, B.S. -Maryland 

Waesche, Frederick Seton, A.B. Maryland 

Whittington, Claude Thomas.North Carolina 
Williams, Palmer Francis C, B.S. 

Maryland 

Wilner, Joseph Walter New York 

Wollak. Theodore Maryland 

Zinn, Ralph Howard, B.S West Virginia 



Honors 

University Prize — Gold Medal — Thomas Nelson Carey 
Certificates of Honor 
Clarence Wh^liam Peake Charles Edward Gill 

Milton Joseph Goldstein Joseph Osias Birnbaum 

John Frank Hewitt 
In the third year the Dr. Jose L. Hirsch Memorial Prize of $50.00 was 
awarded to Charles Edward Gill for the best work in Pathology during 
the second and third years. 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship awarded to the student 
in the Freshman Class with the highest standing was won by John 
Howard Burns. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 83 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The Advisory Committee of the Alumni recommend the fol- 
lowing members as officers for the year 1927-1928 : 



President 
Frank Keating 

Vice-Presidents 

Dr. J. W. Holland Dr. David E. Hoag 

Dr. Henry Kolb 

Secretary 
Dr. Howard M. Bubert 

Assistant Secreta/ry 
Dr. Nathan Winslow 

Treasurer 
Dr. M. LeRoy Lumpkin 

Executive Committee 
Dr. Charles W. Maxson, Chairman 
Dr. Edgar Friedenwald Dr. E. P. Smith 

Dr. C. R. Edwards Dr. J. Frank Kirby 

Advisory Committee 
Dr. Robert L. Mitchell, Chairman 
Dr. Paul Brown Dr. I. S. Zinbeeo 

Dr. C. Habliston Dr. Wm. R. Bridges 

Hospital Committee 
Dr. Griffith W. Davis Dr. M. Linthicum 

Alvmni Council 
Dr. Charles Bagley 

Members of Editorial Committee 
Dr. Howard M. Bubert Dr. Emil Novak 

Necrologist 
Dr. Wm. S. Love 



84 ENDOWMENT FUND 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund : 

Harry Adler, M.D. John B. Thomas, Ph.G. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 

Stuart Janney Robertson Griswold 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the 
State, its legal title being 'The Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University of Maryland," and is independent and 
self-perpetuating. Its powers are limited to the expenditure 
of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied 
in the discretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. 
Contributions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni 
and friends. They may be made to the general or University 
Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other department of the 
University. If intended for the School of Medicine, they may 
be given to the general medical fund or to some special object, 
as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in 
which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. 
Attention is invited to the *' Charles Frick Research Fund," 
already established in memory of that distinguished investiga- 
tor. Checks should be made payable to J. M. H. Rowland, 
Treas., Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 

To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Mary- 
land, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, 

for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

To Endowment Fund 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated imder the laws of 

the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 85 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 
OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 
Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Frances M. Branley, R.N, 

Instructor in Nursing 
IsoBEL Zimmerman, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Helen E. Wright, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Elizabeth Colbourne, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 

Supervisor of Operation Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 
Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 
Grace Pearson, R.N. 

Mary E. Saulsbury, R.N . Night Supervisor 

Jane Moffatt, R.N Supervisor, Dispensary 

Reba Davis, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetrical Ward 

Alice M. Bennett, R.N Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N Head Nurse, Private Hall 

Fernanda Dennis, R.N Head Nurses, Women's Ward 

Helen Morgart, R.N Head Nurse, Men's Medical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N Head Nurse, Men's Surgical Ward 

Ida Nagel, R.N Assistant in Operating Room 

Charlotte Price, R.N Head Nurse, Children's Ward 

Jane Scott, R.N Head Nurse, Accident Room 

Margaret Fink, R.N Head Nurse, Men's Surgical Ward 



86 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

LECTURES FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy 
C. L. Davis, M.D. 

Physiology 
A. H. Ryan, M.D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Chemistry 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D. 

Materia Medica 
W. H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Medicine 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. J. S. Hogan, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. V. L. Elliott, M.D. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D. 

Pediatrics 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Psychiatry 
R. McClury Chapman, M.D. 

Skin and Veneral Diseases 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Ophthalmology 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Otology 
J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Surgery 
Joseph L. Holland, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology 
E. A. Looper, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
R. TuNSTALL Taylor, M.D. 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Social Service 
Special Lecturers 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 87 

STUDENTS ENROLLED, 1926-1927 

Post-graduate 1 

Graduate 1 

Seniors 17 

Intermediates 24 

Juniors and Preparatory 48 

Total 91 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was estab- 
lished in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
Hospital, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being 
morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing 
about 250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thor- 
ough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing, 
including experience in the operating-room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its 
opportunity for varied experience and in its thorough curricu- 
lum taught by best qualified instructors and members of the 
Medical Staff of the University. 

Admission — Requirements : In order to become a candidate 
for admission to the Training School, application must be made 
in person or by letter, to the Superintendent of Nurses. An 
application by letter should be accompanied by a statement 
from a clergyman testifying to good moral character and from 
a physician certifying to sound health and unimpaired facul- 
ties. No person will be considered who is not in a good physical 
condition between the ages of 18 and 35. She must also show 
that she has a High School education or its equivalent. This is 
the minimum requirement, as women of superior education and 
culture are given preference provided they meet the require- 
ments in other particulars. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety 
of dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of proba- 



88 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

tion, is left to the decision of the Superintendent of Nurses. 
Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neg- 
lest of duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the Super- 
intendent of Nurses, with the approval of the President of the 
University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February, June and Sep- 
tember. 

Hours on Duty : During the probation term the students 
are on duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, 
Intermediate and Senior years the students are on eight-hour 
day duty, with six hours on Sunday and Hohdays, and ten-hour 
night duty. The night-duty periods are approximately two 
months each, with one day at the termination of each term for 
rest and recreation. The period of night duty is approximately 
five or six months during the three years. 

Sickness : A physician is in attendance each day, and when 
ill, all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost 
through illness in excess of two weeks during the three years 
must be made up. Should the authorities of the school decide 
that through the time lost the theoretical work has not been 
sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue in that 
year, it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the 
next class. 

Vacations: Vacations are given between June and Sep- 
tember. A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the 
completion of the first year and four weeks at the competion 
of the second year. 

Expense : A student receives her board, lodging and a rea- 
sonable amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During 
her period of probation she provides her own uniforms made 
in accordance with the hospital regulations. After being ac- 
cepted as a student nurse, she wears the uniform furnished 
by the hospital. The student is also provided with textbooks, 
and in addition to this is paid five dollars ($5.00) a month. 
Her personal expenses during the course of instruction and 
training will depend entirely upon her individual habits and 
tastes. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 89 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First Term 

The Junior Year is divided into two periods. The first term 
is the preparatory period (4 months) and the second the junior 
term. 

In the preparatory term the student is given practical in- 
struction in : 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies. The cost 
of hospital materials, apparatus and surgical instru- 
ments. 
II. Household economics and the preparation of foods. 

HI. The hospital out-patients' department and dispensary. 

During this term the practical work is done under constant 
supervision, and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen- 
rooms, laundry and store-room. 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruc- 
tions divided into laboratory and lecture periods is thirty hours 
and includes courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Dietetics, 
Materia Medica, Personal Hygiene, Drugs and Solutions, 
Household Economics, Short Course in Ethics and History of 
Nursing. 

At the close of the first half of Junior Year the students are 
required to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral tests, 
and failure to do so will be sufficient reason to terminate the 
course at this point. 

SUBSEQUENT COURSE 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary 
period, occupies two and three-fourths years, and students are 
not accepted for a shorter period. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly en- 
gaged in practical work under the immediate supervision and 
direction of the head nurses and instructors. 



90 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Second Term 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruc- 
tion in Massage, Bacteriology, General Surgery and Introduc- 
tory Medicine. Practical instruction is received in the male 
and female, medical, surgical and children's wards. 

INTERMEDIATE YEAR 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes Pedi- 
atrics, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics, Gyne- 
cology and Orthopaedics. The practical work provides expe- 
rience in the nursing of obstetrical and gynecological patients, 
in the operating-rooms and the out-patient department. 

SENIOR YEAR 

During this period the student receives short courses of lec- 
tures on subjects of special interest. This includes a consider- 
ation of the work of institutions of public and private charities, 
of settlements, and various branches of professional work" in 
nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administration work to 
those showing exceptional ability in the Senior Year. With 
these students conferences are held on administration and 
teaching problems. 

Examinations: At the end of the first half year, stu- 
dents are examined in Anatomy, Physiology, Materia Medica, 
Dietetics and Hygiene. At the end of the first year in Surgery 
and Bacteriology. 

During the second year they are examined in Urinalysis, 
Massage, Gynecology, General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, 
Obstetrics and Pediatrics. At the end of the third year the 
final examination in Nervous and Mental Diseases, Diseases of 
Special Senses, Venereal Diseases, Ethics and History of 
Nursing. 

Examinations — which are both written and oral — include 
practical tests, and the standing of the student is based upon 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 91 

the general character of work throughout the year, as well as 
the results of the examinations. Students must pass all sub- 
jects before entering upon the work of the following year. 

Graduation : The diploma of the School will be awarded to 
those who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three 
years and have passed successfully the final examinations. 

Scholarships : One scholarship has been established by the 
Alumnae of the Training School. It entitles a nurse to a six 
weeks' course at Teachers' College, New York. This scholar- 
ship is awarded at the close of the third year to the student 
whose work has been of the highest excellence, and who desires 
to pursue post-graduate study and special work. 

An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary 
Board to the student who at the completion of three years 
shows exceptional executive ability. 

A prize of fifty dollars, known as the ''Edwin and Leander 
M. Zimmerman Prize," is given in the senior class to the stu- 
dent whose practical nursing is of the highest excellency and 
whose interest and sympathy in the patients is greatest. 

An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary 
Board to the student who at the completion of three years 
shows exceptional executive ability. 

GRADUATES, 1927 

Baldwin. Estella Coates Maryland Jackson, Virginia Esther Maryland 

Blackbxirn, Hazel Dorothy Maryland Jarrell, Emma Elizabeth Maryland 

Best, Stella Pearl North Carolina Krouse, Beatrice Lutz Maryland 

Foust, Eva Agnes Maryland Royster, Lucy North Carolina 

Gerber, Theressa Rhae Maryland Seiss, Theodosia Mae Maryland 

Hall, Rebecca Jane Maryland Smith, Iris Nancy Virginia 

Henderson, Jane Grace Missouri Wallis, Louisa Mather Maryland 

Holloway, Ethel Catharyn Maryland Young, Grace Elizabeth Maryland 

Holt, Agnes Louise Delaware 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training the 
University offers a combined Academic and Nursing program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in 
Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), 
consisting of 70 semester hours, are spent in the College of 
Arts and Sciences of the University, during which period the 



92 SCHOOLS OP NURSING 

student has an introduction to the general cultural subjects 
which are considered fundamental in any college training. At 
least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park in order that the student may have her share 
in the social and cultural activities of college life. The last 
three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore. In 
the fifth year of the combined program certain elective courses, 
such as Public Health Nursing, Nursing Education, Practical 
Sociology and Educational Psychology are arranged. 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAM IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Freshmen Year 

Semester I Semester II 

English Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101) 3 3 

Foreign Language 4-3 4-3 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101) 4 4 

Elements of Social Science (Soc. Sci. 101) 3 3 

Elementary Foods (H. E. 101) 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 18 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature or History 3 3 

Organic and Food Chemistry 3 

Nutrition 3 

General Economics (Econ. 105) 3 

Elements of Psychology (Psych. 101) 3 

Gen. Zoology (Zool. 101) 4 

PubHc Speaking (P. S. 101-102) 1 1 

Physical Education (Phys. Ed. 102) 2 2 

Electives 1 5 

17 17 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was organized and 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 1899, 
and has operated successfully for a quarter of a century. 

The course of study is three years, during which time the 
Superintendent of the School assigns each pupil for definite 
periods to the various wards and services. Such practical train- 



SCHOOLS OP NURSING 93 

ing under skilled supervisors best applies the science and most 
adequately teaches the art of nursing. The course of study is 
modified and revised year by year, always with the idea of 
improvement. In schools of nursing, as in all other professional 
schools, changes are necessary, for to stand still is to retro- 
grade. Each year new subjects are introduced or old ones are 
taught in new and more attractive ways. The curriculum em- 
braces a preliminary period of four months, a junior term of 
eight months, an intermediate term of twelve months, and a 
senior term of twelve months. 

Mercy Hospital being attached to the Medical School of the 
University of Maryland, its nurses enjoy the exceptional ad- 
vantage of systematic courses of lectures covering every de- 
partment of nursing. These lectures, given by professors who 
are masters of their subjects, are made to co-operate with the 
school curriculum, thus giving the student nurse a thorough 
knowledge of her profession. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applications for admission to the School of Nursing should 
be addressed to Superintendent of Nurses, Mercy Hospital, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Requirements : Highest moral standard, intelligence, health, 
high-school education. Social references and letters from pas- 
tors and physicians are also required. 

The course comprises three years of theory and practice. 
After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School proper, 
receiving Ten Dollars per month, their education being consid- 
ered their compensation. Board, laundry, etc., furnished by 
the institution. 

Four weeks before admission, candidates should forward 
$50.00 and measurements for uniforms and aprons, which will 
be in readiness on their arrival. No orders will be considered 
until this amount is received. These uniforms are worn 
throughout entire course, thus obviating additional expense 
after the probationary term expires. All clothing should be 
distinctly marked with names. Style No. 28, which may be 
procured from Woven Name Tape Co., Winstead, Conn. On 
admission, $10.00 is deposited on account of books. 



94 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 



Hours of duty: 7 A. M. to 7 P. M., with three hours off and 
one hour for meals, making an eight-hour system; one after- 
noon every week. A period of three weeks' vacation is allowed 
at the completion of the first year, and four weeks at the com- 
pletion of the second year. 

If nurses desire to remain out after 9:30 P. M., permission 
must be secured from the Superintendent. Late permission 
until 11:30 P. M. may be obtained once a week, from June to 
September, and twice a month from September to June. No 
visitors allowed except when off duty. 

The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any cause that 
may be deemed sufficient by the Superintendent of Nurses. 

Dentistry should be attended to prior to entrance. Candi- 
dates should come provided with watch with second hand, 
fountain pen, scissors and comfortable shoes with rubber heels 
not too high ; plain underwear, soap, towels, three laundry bags, 
shoe case and napkin ring. 

Address baggage to Nurses' Home, Mercy Hospital, Pleasant 
and Calvert Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

GRADUATES OF 1927 



CATHERINE BERTIN 
JULIA FRANCES COAKLEY 
BESSIE HELEN CUNNINGHAM 
HAZEL BAKER DE REAMER 
SARA LOUISE FLYNN 
ANNA HALL GOULD 
MARGARET MARY JACKMAN 
ANTOINETTE E. JASINSKI 
DELIA ELLEN KANE 
MARY HELEN KEARNEY 



MARY KATHERINE KERR 

MARY CARMELITA KIRBY 

ANN MEYERS 

MARIA AGNES MONAHAN 

REGINA CATHERINE MONAGHAN 

MIMI PASTERNAK 

HELEN AGNES QUIRK 

JANE CARMELITE SMITH 

ELIZABETH M. THISTLEWOOD 

CLARE LOUISE WINAND 



THE INDUSTRIAL PRINTING COMPANY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Vol. XIII 



JULY, 1928 



No. 1 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




PART TWO 

CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 

SESSION 1928-29 

PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR 

JANUARY, APRIL, JULY AND OCTOBER 

LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 

Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as Becond-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Postoffice at 
Baltimore, Maryland, under the Act of August 24, 1912, 



INDEX 



Page 

Alumni Association 88 

Annual Hospital Appointments 80 

Board of Instruction 8 

Board of Regents 6 

Calendar 4 

Combined Course in Arts and Medicine 74 

Consolidation of Schools 14 

Curriculum, Organization of 39 

Anatomy 40 

Histology 41 

Embryology 41 

Physiology 41 

Bacteriology and Immunology 43 

Biological Chemistry 43 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica. . . 44 

Pathology 46 

Medicine 48 

Clinical Pathology 51 

Gastro-Enterology 52 

Psychiatry 52 

Pediatrics 53 

Neurology 54 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. . . 54 

Medical Jurisprudence 55 

Surgery 56 

Anaesthesia 59 

Dermatology 59 

Orthopaedic Surgery 59 

Roentgenology 60 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy.... 61 

Throat and Nose 61 

Genito-Urinary 61 

Colon and Rectum 62 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy. . . 63 

Obstetrics 63 

Gynecology 64 

Ophthalmology and Otology 64 

History of Medicine 65 

Dispensary Reports: 

Mercy Hospital 32 

University Hospital 24 



Page 
Clinical Facilities : 

Mercy Hospital 25 

University Hospital 17 

Dispensary Staffs : 

Mercy Hospital 30 

University Hospital 21 

Endowment Fund 89 

Expenses, Students' 81 

Fees 75 

Graduates 87 

General Summary of Students 86 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 34 

Mercy Hospital 25 

Baltimore City Hospitals 32 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 37 

University Hospital 17 

Libraries 38 

Matriculates 82 

Medical Council 7 

Prizes 77 

Prizemen 87 

Requirements for Matriculation 71 

Rules 74 

Schedule 67 

Scholarships 77 

Staffs : 

Baltimore City Hospital 33 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital. . 34 

Mercy Hospital 26 

University Hospital 19 

Training Schools for Nurses : 

Mercy Hospital 96 

University Hospital 90 

University Council 6 

University of Maryland, Organization 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of Mary- 
laud, Baltimore Medical College News^ and tlie Journal of 
the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

VOL. XIII JULY, 1928 No. 1 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1928-1929 



BALTIMORE SCHOOLS (PROFESSIONAL GROUP) 
CALENDAR, 1928-1929 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1928 

Monday, September 24 — Registration begins. 

Monday, October 1 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Monday, October 8 — Last day to register without paying fine of $5.00. 

Monday, November 12 — Holiday (Armistice Day). 

Wednesday, November 28 — Thanksgiving recess begins after the last scheduled 
I>eriod. 

Monday, December 3 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

Saturday, December 22 — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

1929 

Thursday, January 8 — Instruction resumed with the first SKsheduled period. 

Saturday, January 26 — First semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Monday, January 14 — Registration begins for second semester. 
Monday, January 28 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 
Saturday, February 2 — Last day to register without paying fine of $5.00. 
Friday, February 22 — Holiday (Washington's Birthday). 
Thursday, March 28 — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 
Tuesday, April 2 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
Saturday, June 8 — Commencement Day. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of 
nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for terms of nine years each. The general administration 
of the University is vested in the President. The University Coun- 
cil is an advisory body, composed of the President, the Assistant to 
the President, the Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. The Univer- 
sity Council acts upon all matters having relation to the University 
as a whole, or to cooperative work between the constituent groups. 
Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean 
and members of its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the in- 
ternal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization : 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistiw and Pharmacy are 
located in Baltimore; the others in College Park, Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman Term expires 1933 

Robert Grain, Esq Term expires 1933 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer Term expires 1932 

Dr. Frank J. Goodnow Term expires 1931 

John E. Raine, Esq Term expires 1930 

C. C. Gelder, Esq Term expires 1929 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary Term expires 1927 

Henry Holzapel, Jr., Esq Term expires 1934 

E. Brooke Lee, Esq Term expires 1935 



Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President and Executive Officer 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President 

H. C. Byrd, B.S Assistant to the President 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Director of the Experiment Station 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng Dean of the College of Engineering 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D. .Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Phar.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. S. Small, Ph.D Dean of the College of Education 

M. Marie Mount, M.A Dean of the College of Home Economics 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., ScD. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.D., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B., M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

EDUARD UHLENHUTH, Ph.D. 

HARRY J. DEUEL, Jr., Ph.D. 



8 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Surgery 

Samuel K. Mebrick, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., LL.D Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Chas. O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeteb, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D,, LL.D Clinical Medicine 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

J. M. Hundley, M.D Gynecology 

George W. Dobbin, M.D Obstetrics 

PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harry J. Deuel, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 

Therapeutics. 
Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 
C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM. (Edinburgh), Professor of Hygiene and 

Public Health. 
John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 
S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 9 

G. Cakroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Hak\iey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 

Roentgenology. 
Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Professior of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of 

Medicine. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Edgab B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and 

Nose. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Elliott Hutchins, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
C. LoRiNG JosLiN, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 
R. W. LocHER, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery. 
H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
Abraham Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
C. C. CoNSLR, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
0. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bebgland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 
W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
C. Reid Edwards, M.D,, Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Eduaed Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
H. S. Sullivan, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
F. A. RiES, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
A. J. GiLLis, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, M. D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
John R. Aberceombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 
W. I. Messick, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of Throat and Nose. 
W. H. Daniels, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Harris Goldman, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
C. A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 
M. J. Hanna, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
A. H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
Babtus T. Baggott, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 11 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

John F. Traband, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clement R. Monroe, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, A.B., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

H. M. Foster, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

M. A. NovEY, A.B., M. D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D,, Associate in Pediatrics. 

W. S. Love, Jr., M.D., Associate in Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 

A. A. SussMAN, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 

Samuel B. Wolfe, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

John F. Lutz, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Wm. J. Todd, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wm. F. Geyer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

George A. Knipp, M.D., Instructor in Physiology and Pediatrics. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

William Michel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

C. F. Horine, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Edward Novak, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Isadore a. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

N. J. Davidov, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. KoppLEMAN, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Insitructor in Pediatrics. 

I. S. Zinberg, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 



X2 BOARD OP INSTRUCTION 

Fredebick B. Dart, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

B. J. Ferry, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

M. G. TuLL, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

ISADORE I. Levy, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Proctology. 

William A. Strauss, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

MosES Gellman, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Arnold Lawson Jensen, B.Sc, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

I. O. Ridgley, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy, Surgery and Pathology. 

E. W. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Ins'tructor in Surgery. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Samuel Glick, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics and Assistant in Pathology. 

M. N. PuTTERMAN, M.D., lustructor in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

A. H. P^NKELSTEiN, M.D., lustructor in Pediatrics. 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics'. 

Robert Hodes, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

M. H. Goodman, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. R. Geraghty, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Clyde N. Mar\t:l, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D., Assistaut in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. H. CoLLiNSON, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy and Surgery. 

A. C. MoNNiNGER, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

John A. O'Connor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

James Brown, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

A. V. BuCHNESs, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmuller, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

L. J. MiLLAN, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

William Emrich, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. H. Woody, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Leo T. Brown, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

C. v. Hooper, Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
James W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 13 



J. HuLLA, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 

Ruth Musser, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology. 

Henry Wasserman, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

K. B. Legge, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

T. B. Aycock, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

F. A. SiGRiST, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

L. T. Lavy, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Benjamin Miller, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

E. V. Teagarden, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Ruth F. Carr, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

W. D. HAWKIN&, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology. 

Maurice Shamer, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institu- 
tions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore 
Medical College, the entire equipment of three large medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United 
States. It was chartered in 1807, under the name of the College 
of Medicine of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. 
In 1812 the College was empowered by the Legislature to annex 
three other colleges or faculties, of Divinity, of Law, and of Arts 
and Sciences, and the four colleges thus united were ''constituted 
an University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland. '^ 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medicine 
of the University of Maryland has always been a leading medical 
college, especially prominent in the South and widely known and 
highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medi- 
cal teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical libraries 
and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837), and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867), and 
of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for ade- 
quate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, 
and in this hospital intramural residency for the senior student 
was first established. 



ORGANIZATION 15 

In 1913, juncture was brous^ht about with the Baltimore Medical 
College, an institution of 32 years' growth. By this association the 
facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, equip- 
ment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated under 
Legislative enactment in 1872, and established on Hanover Street 
in a building afterwards known as the Maternite, the first obstetri- 
cal hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was affected with the 
Washington University School of ^ledicine, in existence since 1827, 
and the college was removed to its present location at Calvert and 
Saratoga Streets. By this arrangement medical control of the City 
Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, and on this founda- 
tion in 1899 the present admirable college building was erected. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES 

The Laboratories 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of build- 
ings at Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South 
Paca Street. The schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory 
periods are placed with a view of obviating unnecessary move- 
ment on the part of the classes. The building known as Gray 
Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses three depart- 
ments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top floor, 
where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric lighting 
gives adequate illumination of the subjects. On this floor are the 
oflice of the department and the necessary preparation rooms. The 
Department of Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is 
a large room for the general student laboratory, which is thoroughly 
equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in addition 
contains many instruments of unique and original design. With 
oflice and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is complete for 
student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray Laboratory is 
the Department of Physiology. In addition to the large student 
laboratory, which is constructed for sections of forty-five students, 



16 ORGANIZATION 

there are rooms for the departmental office, preparation of material, 
and storage of apparatus. An additional room is devoted exclu- 
sively to mammalian experiments. In this building there is main- 
tained an animal room where is kept an abundance of material for 
experimental purposes. The embalming and storage plant for the 
Department of Anatomy is in physical connection with the building 
and its special departments. The laboratories of physiology and 
pharmacology are completely equipped with apparatus lockers so 
that in accord with the best ideas of instruction, the students work 
in groups of two each, and each group has sufficient apparatus so 
that the experimental work can be carried on without delay or re- 
course to a general stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology and Biochemistry are located on 
the third floor of the Dental Building. The former department has 
a large student laboratory with a capacity of ninety; the tables 
are so placed as to secure the most satisfactory illumination for 
microscopic work, in addition, all of the tables are electrically 
equipped for substage illumination. This equipment is also pro- 
vided for all laboratories where microscopic work obtains. The 
museum of the Department of Pathology adjoins the student labora- 
tory. Here are available for demonstration about fifteen hundred 
carefully prepared and mounted specimens, and for laboratory in- 
struction and study, an abundance of autopsy material with com- 
plete clinical histories. Several preparation, research, and office 
rooms communicate with the other rooms of this department. The 
laboratory of Biochemistry is constructed and equipped for sec- 
tions of fifty. The laboratory is completely equipped for the facili- 
tation of work. The office and stockroom adjoin. In the Main 
Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged for student 
reference, specimens which represent the careful selection of mate- 
rial over a period of many years. In the University Hospital is 
the Student Laboratory for the analytical studies by those students 
who are serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar labora- 
tory is maintained in the building at the northwest corner of Sara- 
toga and Calvert Streets, for the student work on the wards of the 
Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are two laboratories for Bacteri- 
ology, Histology, and Clinical Pathology. The two laboratories 
accommodate one hundred and twenty -five students or the full class, 



CLINICAL FACILITIES I7 

and are equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and ap- 
paratus. Each of the departments housed in this buiUling are pro- 
vided with their individual offices, preparation and stockrooms. 

Clinical Facilities 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
The University Hospital, which is the property of the University 
of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in 
the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 1823, under 
the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that time consisted 
af but four wards, one of which was reserved for the eye cases. 

The present hospital has a capacity of 275 beds devoted to gen- 
eral medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical and sur- 
gical specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly modern X-ray 
department and clinical laboratory, and a post-mortem building 
which is constructed with special reference to the instruction of 
students in patJiological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings so 
that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture halls 
and laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary and 
wards. 

Owing to its situation, being adjacent to the largest manufactur- 
ing district of the city and the shipping district, large numbers of 
accident cases are received. These combined with the cases of 
many sick seamen and with patients from our own city furnish a 
large amount of clinical material. Accommodations for thirty 
obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital for the purpose of 
furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each member of the 
graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor obstetrical 
clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful pre-natal super- 
vision, is attended during labor by a senior student, supervised by 
a hospital physician and assisted by a graduate nurse, and is visited 
during the puerperium by the attending student and graduate 
nurse. Careful pre-natal, labor and puerperal records are kept, mak- 
ing this work of extreme value to the medical student, not only 
from the obstetrical standpoint, but in making him appreciate the 
value of social service and public health work. 



18 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

During the year ending December 31, 1927, 458 cases were deliv- 
ered in the hospital and 1094 cases in the outdoor department. 
Students in the graduating class delivered an average of fourteen 
cases, each student being required to deliver twelve cases. 

The dispensaries associated Avith the University Hospital and 
the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order that 
the teaching may be the same in each. Each dispensary has the 
following departments: Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Children, 
Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, 
Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctolog}^, Dermatology, Throat and 
Nose, Tuberculosis and Ps^^chiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special departments 
one hour each day. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 19 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean. 

M. C. PiNcoFFS, S.B., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, President of the Board of Regents. 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurs^es. > 

J. Allison Muir, 

G. M. Shriver, 

W. B. Brooks, 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff 
J. W. Holland, M.D. C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni 
Charles W. Maxson, M.D. G. Milton Linthicum, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

Physicians 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 
R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatrician 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Pathologists 
Hugh R. Spexcer, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Surgeons 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 
Edward A. Loopeb, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 
R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Henry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Bronchoscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Anaesthetists 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D. Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S. 

W. G. Queen, M.D. 

Ol)stetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. NovEY, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

ISADOR H. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

William Tarun, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Gynecologists 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D. W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

Hugh Brent, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 21 

RESIDENT STAFF 1928-1929 

Resident in Surgery L. U. Lumpkin, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery C. F. Kabns, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery H. V. Davis, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery J. R. Phillips, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Roentgenology Samuel Weinstein, M.D. 

Resident in Medicine C. E. Gill, M.D. 

Resident in Obstetrics William Linthicum, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Obstetrics Theodore Wollaki, M.D. 

Resident in Gynecology J. R. Hibbitts, M.D. 

INTERNES 

Dr. Hugh A. Bailey Dr. Luther E. Little 

Dr. George A. Duncan Dr. M. C. Smoot 

Dr. Creed C. Greer Dr. William H. Varney 

Dr. Georg K. Gulck Dr. C. Gardner Warner 

Dr. Lewis P. Gundry Dr. E. Eldon Baum 

Dr. Joseph G. Laukaitis Dr. Bryan N. Roberts 
Dr. Earl F. Limbach 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Medicine 

H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
William Michel, M.D. W. H. Triplett, M.D. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D. Joseph Rosenblatt, M.D. 

S. B. Wolfe, M.D. Leo Lally, M.D. 

Thomas Coonan, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 
J. H. Ullrich, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. N. J. Davidov, M.D. 

Leo T. Brown, M.D. C. Vance Hooper, M.D. 

Neurology 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D. Robert Hodes, M.D. 

Mental Hygiene 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Director 

G. H. Preston, M.D. 



22 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



Diseases of the Lungs 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Cardiovascular Diseases 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Feanklin Eledee, M.D. 

Allergy Clinic 
H. M. BUBEET, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Pediatrics 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics 
C. LoRiXG Joslix, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
JoHX H. Trabaxd, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Clarence E. Macke, M.D. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D. 
William J. Todd, M.D. 
F. Steatnee Orem, M.D. 
William G. Geyee, M.D. 
Geoege a. Knipp, M.D. 
Beenaed J. Ferry, M.D. 
I. J. Feinglos, M.D. 
Feedeeick B. Daet, M.D. 
S. C. Feldman, M.D. 



R. M. Hening, M.D. 
Maeie Kovnee, M.D. 
Clewell Howell, M.D. 
Samuel Glick, M.D, 
Elizabeth Sherman, M.D. 
M. N. Putterman, M.D. 

A. H. FiNKELSTEIN, M.D. 

Louis T. Lavy, M.D. 
Benjamin Miller, M.D. 
E. V. Teagaeden, M.D. 



Surgery 
Charles Reid Edwaeds, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. M. Fostee, M.D. E. S. Johnson, M.D. 

C. A. Reifschneidee, M.D. W. R. Johnson, M.D. 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. James Beown, M.D. 

F. A. SiGEiST, M.D. S. H. Culvee, M.D. 

J. H. WiLKEESON, M.D. A. C. MONNINGEE, M.D. 



Orthopaedic Surgery 

R. Tunstall Tayloe, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 
CoMPTON Riely, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Harey L. Rogees, M.D. Clement R. Moneoe, M.D. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, A.B., M.D. Moses Gellman, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 23 

Genito-Urinary 

W. H. TouLSOX, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Harris Goldman, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

J. H. CoLLiNsoN, M.D. H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D. L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

LYLE J. MiLLAN, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatology 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. E. Gately, M.D. 

Nose and Throat 

E. A. Looper, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

F. a. Holden, M.D. Thomas O'Rourke, M.D. 

Charles H. Cahn, M.D. Edward Talbott, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. 

Colon and Rectum 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Gynecology 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. George L. Wissig, M.D. 

William J. Fulton, M.D. 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Dudley Pleasants Bowe, B.A., M.D. M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

Majxwell Mazer, M.D. Maurice Shamer, M.D. 

Eye and Bar 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Charles Cahn, M.D. John G. Runkel, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



24 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

October 1, 1926, to September 30, 1927. 

( Cases ^ 

Department New Old Total 

Pediatrics 2,667 19,189 21,856 

Dermatology 5,382 9,644 15,026 

Surgery 1,987 6,723 8,710 

Medicine 1,947 5,223 7,170 

Obstetrics 1,624 5,233 6,857 

Genito-Urinary 821 5,010 5,831 

Eye and Ear 1,324 4,085 5,409 

Gynecology 1,182 2,644 3,826 

Nose and Throat 1,046 991 2,037 

Orthopaedic 236 1,604 1,840 

Gastro-Intestinal 200 845 1,045 

Neurology 181 666 847 

Cystoscopy 60 277 337 

Psychiatry 139 169 308 

Proctology 94 212 306 

Tuberculosis 126 177 303 

Cardiology 70 173 243 



Total 19,086 62,865 81,951 

In addition to the above, there were treated in the State Venereal Clinic 
21,035 cases. 



MERCY HOSPITAL 25 



MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Wash- 
ington University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital 
came under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
but the Sisters continued their work of administering to the 
patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the 
rapidly growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 
that the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the corner- 
stone of the present Hospital. This building was completed and 
occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing demands for more 
space has compelled the erection of additions, until now there are 
accommodations for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital 
to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 800,000 
inhabitants. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

It adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients from 
the public w^ards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates 
the clinical teaching, as there is no time lost in passing from one 
to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Eailways and Elec- 
tric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania 
Kailroad Company and its branches. 



26 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman 
Sister M. Carmelita Dr. Alexius McGlannan 

SiSTEB M. Siena Dr. Walter D. Wise 

Sister M. Hildegabde Dr. Thomas K. Galvin 

Sister M. Anita Dr. Andrew C. Gillis 

Sister M. Joan Dr. Standish McCleaby 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

SURGICAL DIVISION 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D. Elliott Hutchins, M.D. 

W. D. Wise, M.D. A. M. Evans, M.D. 

C. F. Blake, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

Associate Sturgeons 
R. H. Locher, M.D. I. O. Ridgley, M.D. 

T. R. Chambers, M.D. N. C. Marvel, M.D. 

F. X. ICearney, M.D. D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Assistant Surgeons 
Charles Maxson, M.D. Dwight Mohr, M.D. 

A. B. McElwain, M.D. H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D. J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 

H. K. Fleck, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Rhinologists and Laryngologists 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D. Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

Associate 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Assistant 
K. W. Golley, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



27 



Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis, M.D. 

Assistant 
Kenneth B. Legge, M.D. 

Dentist 
John Frederick, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 



Cart B. Gamble, M.D. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 



Associates 



Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 
C. C. W. JuDD, M.D. 
H. R. Peters, M.D. 
Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 



Oastro-Enterologist 
Julius Fbiedenwald, M.D. 



George McLean, M.D. 
A. A. SussMAN, M.D. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 
John E. Legge, M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

F. B. Smith, M. D. 



Associates 



Assistants 



Pediatricians 



Assistants 



Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 



T. F. Daniels, M.D. 



Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 
MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



28 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. B. P. Smith, M.D. 

A. Samuels, M.D. J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

G. A. Strauss, M.D. E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 

William S. Gardner, M.D, E. P. Smith, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. Abraham Samuels, M.D. 

T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Associate 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

Assistant 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 
Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. Collenberg 

H. R. Peters, M.D. Emll G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians 

Sister M. Joan, Pli.G., R.N. Anna Chenoweth, R.N. 

Frances Donovan, R.N. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographers 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. W. GOLLEY, M.D. 

Technician — Sister M. Antonia, R.N. 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 



29 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Resident Surgeon 
John L. Winstead, M.D. 



Assistant Resident Surgeons 



E. Prefontaine, M.D. 
Francis W. Gillis, M.D. 



.Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 
J. Benesunes, M.D. 



Resident Physician 
T. N. Cabey, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist 
Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



J. P. Barnes, M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 
J. H. Rutter, M.D. 
F. T. Zimmerman, M.D. 



Internes 



C. P. Roetling, M.D. 

M. SCHAPIRO, M.D. 

David Tenner, M.D. 
M. Levinsky, M.D. 



30 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 

Surgery Supervisors 



AiExius McGlannan, M.D. 



D. H. MoHB, M.D. 

I. O. RIDGLEY, M.D. 

John O'Connor, M.D. 



A. J. GiLLis, M.D. 



Albebtus Cotton, M.D. 



W. F. LoCKwooD, M.D. 



Attending Surgeons 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 
Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

K. W. GOLUEY, M.D. 

Medicine Supervisors 



W. D. Wise, M.D. 



D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

H. F. BONGABDT, M.D. 

T. J. TouHEY, M.D. 



K. B. Legge, M.D. 



Habry L. Rogers, M.D. 



M. C. PlNCOFFS, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 
A. W. Kelly, M.D. 



Attending Physicians 
A. A. SussMAN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

S. Snyder, M.D. 
Harry G. Miller, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
A. A. SussMAN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lungs 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 



31 



Diseases of Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 



Attending Physicians 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 
M. Feldman, M.D. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 



Joseph Sindler, M.D. 
A. Eisenberg, M.D. 
I. I. Levy, M.D. 



Esophagoscopist 
W. F. Zinn, M.D. 



MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 



Nervous Diseases 
Snipervisor, A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 



Robert Hodes, M.D. 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 



Diseases of Women 
Supervisors 



A. Samuels, M.D. 



E. P. Smith, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 



W. F. Zinn, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



H. F. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



Attending Surgeons 

E. Edlavitch, M.D. 
Diseases of Nose a^id Throat 

B. McGowAN, M.D. 
Diseases of Eye and Em 

Bernard Wess, M.D. 

Dermatology 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

Assistant 
William G. Coppage, M.D, 



T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

C. F. J. COUGHLIN, M.D. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 
Louise Small, M.D. 



M. Raskin, M.D. 

F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Social Service Department 



Sister M. Helen, R.N. 



Elise Linfert, A.m. 



32 MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

( Cases- 
Old 

Surgical 2,729 

Medical 1,849 

Gynecology 798 

Eye and Ear 741 

Nose and Throat 526 

Neurological 367 

Children 56 

Gastro-Intestinal 494 

Dental 80 

Rectal 35 

Orthopaedic 977 

Skin 403 

Genito-Urinary 3,918 



New 


Total 


1,013 


3,742 


1,161 


3,010 


325 


1.123 


374 


1,115 


691 


1,217 


132 


499 


90 


146 


126 


620 


70 


150 


22 


57 


201 


1,178 


178 


581 


679 


4,597 



Total 12,973 5,062 18,035 

OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 
THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals to be 
used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily visits 
and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the Hospitals. 
The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in amount, 
thoroughness in study, and the use made of it in medical teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following separate 
hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 180 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 
The Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 



STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL 33 

STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

VISITING STAFF 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

C. C. Hablistox, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Tuberculosis Hospital. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Physiciavrin-Charge of the Detention Hospital for 

the Insane. 
Wiley D. Forbus, A.B., M.D., Visiting Pathologist. 
W. D. Hawkins, A.B., M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

Otologist 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Gynecologists 

R. G. WiLLSE, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngologists 

H. R. Slack, M.D. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Pediatrician 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

^Neurologist 
Oliver Smith, A.B., M.D. 

Psychiatrists 

Henry J. Berkley, M.D. 

Adolph Meyer, M.D. 

Orthopaedist 
H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Proctologist 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.B., M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Physician 
Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

C. A. Reifschnteider, M.D. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D. 



34 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF MARYLAND 

FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution contains 100 beds for the active treatment of 
deformities, a new fire-proof building having been recently added, 
with every possible facility for the operative and physical treat- 
ment of these cases. It owns an estate known as ^'Radnor Park," 
of colonial origin, comprising 75 acres, at Hillsdale, within the 
northwestern city limits, and may be reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds and 
rooms with private baths and terraces adjacent, overlooking a beau- 
tiful park-like environment, especially adapted for heliotherapy in 
tuberculosis, rachitic, osteomyelitic and arthritic conditions. A 
dairy and farm are maintained in connection with this hospital. 
The dispensary of this hospital is maintained across the street from 
the University Hospital, with which this institution is in close 
affiliation, for didactic, clinical, dispensary and bedside instruction. 
It is the Orthopaedic Department of the University of Maryland, 
and maintained in connection with it is a well-equipped Physio- 
therapy branch, affording the student an opportunity to familiarize 
himself with the newer methods in the application of actinotherapy, 
diathermy, thermotherapy, electricity and hydrotherapy. 

STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director 

R. TuNSTALL Taylor, A.B., M.D. 

Associate Surgeons 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Clement R. Monroe, M.D. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, A.B., M.D., D.T.M.&H. (London) 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 35 

Assistant and Dispensary Surgeons 

CoMPTON RiELY, M.D. ARNOLD Lawson Jensen, B.Sc, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S. (Eng. Ire.) Hon. 

Randolph Winslow, A.B., M.A., M.D., LL.D. 

Surgeon 
Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Plastic Surgeon 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Nduro-Surgeon 
Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist and Aurist 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D., LL.D. 

Oculist and Aurist 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Laryngologist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Assistant Laryngologists 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. Allen Holden, M.D. 

Everett L. Bishop, M.D. Marshall P. Byerly, M.D. 

Dentists 
J. B. Bell, D.D.S. C. Merle Dixon, Jr., D.D.S. 

Consulting Physicians 
Lewellys F. Baricer, A.B., M.D. Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Fltcher, A.B., M.D. William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist 
Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologist 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 



36 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 

Pathologist 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Resident Surgeon 
Clement R, Monroe, M.D. 

Resident Student Interne 
Samuel Philip Sardo 

Head Nurse 
Miss Grace Lovell Elgin, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse 
Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapists, Masseuses and Instructors in Corrective Gymnastics 
Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Miss Elizabeth Emory Miss Florence Grape 

Roentgenologists 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instructors in Grammar School 
Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal Miss Mary Sampson, Assistant 

Superintendent and Business Manager 
Mrs. M. E. Lane 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 



37 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland 
by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school 
to present to its students liberal opportunities for the study of 
diseases of infants and children. 



STAFF 



Obstetrician 
Dr. L. H. Douglass 



Dr. W. C. Bacon 

Dr. C. R. Goldsborough 



Pediatricians 



Dr. W. H. Ingram 
Dr. C. L. Joslin 



Surgeon 
Dr. N. Win slow 

Dermatologist 
Dr. J. A. BucHNESS 



Dr. C. a. Clapp 



Oculists 



Dr. F. B. Anderson 



Orthopedic Surgeon 
Dr. W. H. Daniels 

Physician 
Dr. C. p. Clautice 



Epidemiologist 
Dr. H. E. Reifschneider 



38 LIBRARIES 



LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the 
collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 28,398 volumes, a 
file of 70 current (medical) journals, and several thousand pam- 
phlets and reprints. It is well stocked with recent literature, in- 
cluding books and periodicals of general interest. The home of the 
Library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious building 
in close proximity to the classrooms and the Laboratories of the 
Medical Department. The Library is open daily during the year, 
except in August, for use of members of the Faculty, the students, 
and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
containing 50,000 volumes, is open to the students of the school. 
The leading medical publications of the world are received by the 
Library, and complete sets of many journals are available. Other 
Libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (254,547 volumes) and the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library (558,324 volumes). 

All these Libraries are open to the students of the school with- 
out charge. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision of 
teaching in this school in order to meet modern requirements. The 
multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery necessitates a 
very crowded course and the introduction of electives will very soon 
be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments : 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in 
the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory work 
occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of instructors insures attention to the 
needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is determined 
largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work car- 
ried on throughout the course. 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 
AND EMBRYOLOGY 

C. L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uiilexhuth, Ph.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Wm. R, Joh-xsox, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

RoBT. W. JOHXsox, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.B Assistant in Histology 

JAS. W. Nelsox, M.D Assistant in Histology 

J. Bulla, M.D Assistant in Histology 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Three to four hours every day 
for approximately 30 weeks. The entire course centers around the 
dissection of the human body. Each student is given opportunity 
of dissecting an entire half (left or right) of the body. The dis- 
section is supplemented by lectures and informal discussions. 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being 
laid on the human species as contrasted to animal morphology. An 
attempt is made to familiarize the student with the elements of 
anthropometry, with sj^stematic and regional anatomy, with the 
principles of topographical anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of the 
body surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided for 
taking representative measurements of the head, face, trunk and 
limbs and of acquiring a knowledge of using anthropometric instru- 
ments. Throughout the dissection the student is encouraged to take 
measurements and weights of all the major organs, including the 
brain and the endocrine organs, and to obtain a knowledge of the 
proportions of each organ to the body as a whole as vv^ell as to the 
variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to topographical regions 
of the body, but systematic relations are continuously emphasized 
and, wherever possible, brought out by actual dissection. 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the 
muscles and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto- 
muscular apparatus. Each student is provided with a set of bones 
to aid him in his homework. A charge of |6 is made for each set, 
|4 of which is returned at the end of the year, while the remaining 
|2 are used for the upkeep of old and the purchase of new skeletal 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 41 

material. Fifty complete and perfect skeletons of the whole body 
and about as many of the limbs are available for reference and spe- 
cial advanced work. 

At the end of the course the entire work is reviewed in a series 
of lectures presenting the entire anatomical basis of the most rep- 
resentative physiological activities, such as respiration, secretion, 
digestion, endocrine activity, parturition, etc. 

As a continuation of the knowledge gained from the dissection 
of the peripheral spinal and autonomic nervous system and as an 
introduction to neuroanatomy, each student is given an opportunity 
to dissect a complete human brain. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided for 
advanced special dissections and for research work in every branch 
of anatomy. Dr. Eduard Uhlenhuth. 

Histology and Embryology 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, eight 
hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Histology and embryology are 
taught as a common subject, the histogenesis of a part preceding its 
histological study. 

The most important part of the work will be done in the labora- 
tory, where each student will be provided with apparatus, staining 
fluids and material necessary for the preparation of specimens for 
microscopial examination. An important aid to the course is the 
projection microscope and balopticon which are used for the pro- 
jection upon a screen of magnified images of the specimens actually 
used in the laboratory, and of illustrations from standard text-books. 

Each student is provided with a loan collection of histological 
slides, for which a deposit of |10 is required. This deposit is re- 
funded upon the return of the slides in a satisfactory condition. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Harry J. Deuel, Jr., Ph.D Professor of Physiology 

Ferd a. Ries, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

Samuel B. Wolfe, M.D Associate in Physiology 

George A. Knipp, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

1. The required course consists of lectures, recitations, labora- 
tory work, demonstrations and conferences in the first and second 
years. 



42 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

First Year. One hour a week is devoted to the subject during the 
first year. The lectures are devoted to a general survey of the sub- 
ject and to the physiology of digestion and blood. 

Second Year, Three one-hour periods weekly throughout the year 
are devoted to lectures and recitations. At these lectures, charts, 
lantern slides and demonstrations are used. Three hours weekly 
during the first semester and six hours per week during the second 
semester are spent in the laboratory. 

The laboratory work of the second year begins with a study of 
irritability and contractility and with methods of making precise 
quantitative physiological observations and controls^ curve plotting, 
interpretation of data and the use of physiological apparatus. 
Students work in groups of two at completely equipped desks, and 
the material consists largely of the frog and turtle. 

This is followed by experiments in which the students work in 
groups of four to six, largely upon mammals as well as themselves, 
and includes the subjects: circulation and body fluids, respiration, 
digestion, secretion, metabolism, internal secretion, central nervous 
system and special senses. Specially equipped laboratories are used 
for certain parts of the work. Students are taught to treat animals 
with the same consideration and interest as patients. 

The work is arranged to illustrate fundamental principles of 
physiology and at the same time familiarize the students in methods 
of thought and technique essential to diagnosis and directly appli- 
cable to the clinic and bedside. 

2. Clinical Physiology. During the second semester of the 
second year a one-hour clinic is held each week by the Department 
of Medicine to correlate physiology and medicine and serve as an 
introduction to the work of the clinical years. 

3. Elective Work. This is offered to students of the third and 
fourth years, without credit, in the following subjects: basal 
metabolism, internal secretions and central nervous system. 

4. Research. Hours to be arranged. The facilities of the lab- 
oratory are available to qualified persons to undertake original 
investigation, the laboratory bearing all reasonable expense for 
material. 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 43 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Bueitner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the second year during the first semester. This in- 
cludes the various methods of preparation and sterilization of cul- 
ture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bacteriological 
examination of water and milk. The bacteriological diagnosis of 
the communicable diseases is also included in this course. Animal 
inoculations are made in connection with the bacteria studied. The 
most important protozoa are also studied in the laboratory. The 
principles of general bacteriology are taught by quiz, conference 
and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes, 
conferences and lectures to the second-year class throughout the 
second semester, and practical experiments are carried out by the 
class in laboratory sessions of three hours each, held twice weekly 
during the semester. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H, Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Ruth F. Care, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

Instruction in biological chemistry comprises laboratory work, 
lectures and conferences. 

The laboratory work consists in the study of important indi- 
cators, volumetric solutions, buffer solutions, colloids and membrane 
phenomena followed by experiments illustrating the physical and 
chemical properties of carbohydrates, proteins and lipins. Sub- 
sequently, the examination of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, 
gastric contents, tissues of the body, bile, milk and the investigations 
of blood and urine chemistry conclude the assigned experimental 
work. 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The lectures treat of laboratory technique, the chemistry of indi- 
cators, hydrogen-ion concentration, the physical chemistry of the 
cell, osmosis, diffusion, dialysis, the law of mass action, reversible 
reactions, catalysis and enzymes. The following lectures refer to 
the metabolism of water, salts, other inorganic substances, carbo- 
hydrates, proteins and lipins, vitamins and deficiency diseases, 
dietary requirements, basal metabolism, acid-base balance and, 
finally, the secretions and excretions. 

The conferences are conducted by one of the instructors and take 
the form of short, written examinations and informal oral quizzes. 



PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA 

William Henry Schltltz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

O. G. Harne, A.B Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne Assistant in Pharmacology 

Ruth Mussee, A.B Assistant in Pharmacology 

1. Materia Meuica and Pharmacology. Fifty-six hours re- 
quired. 

The methods now used in presenting the subject-matter of 
IMateria Medica and Prescription Writing have evolved as a result 
of some years of practical teaching. The science of Pharmacology 
has introduced methods of critical analysis in the choice of drugs 
proposed for use as medicine. As aids in determining the particu- 
lar drugs chosen for study, use is made of the '^United States 
Pharmacopoeia" and "New and Non-Oflficial Remedies." 

Official titles, whenever practicable, are expressed in English and 
all quantities are stated in terms of the metric system. The only 
way to get away from the unscientific system of English weights 
and measures, and from a Latin system which few ever learn cor- 
rectly, is to refuse to teach either one of them. 

When possible, drugs are grouped according to their chemical 
composition and the influence of various radicals and side chains 
emphasized, whereas drugs, the chemistry of which is not definitely 
established, are grouped according to their dominant physiological 
action. Follo^\ing the Pharmacology of a given group, their place 
in practical medicine is indicated, and the student is requested to 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

prescribe same in suitable form. Thus a Materia Medica is de- 
veloped tlirougliout the course, based upou Pharmacological action 
of drugs. 

2. Systematic Pharmacology. Ninety-six hours required. Sec- 
ond year. In this portion of the course the student is taught Phar- 
macology as a pure science. The aim is to attain a mean between 
that which has a purely scientific bearing and that dominantly prac- 
tical, so that both a critical attitude toward drugs and an under- 
standing of the principles of dosage may be acquired. This is ac- 
complished by lectures, quizzes, conferences and the following course 
of laboratory exercises. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. Niuety-six hours. Second Year. This 
laboratory course runs parallel with Pharmacology 2. Many of 
the most important problems of Immunology, Parasitic intoxica- 
tions, and of Chemotherapy are essentially Pharmacological. In 
the first part of the course the experiments are upon normal animals, 
hence, primarily toxicological in character. In the latter part of 
the course more and more emphasis is laid upon what is now des- 
ignated as chemo-therapeutic index of drugs. 

4. Pharmacology of General and Local Anesthetics and 
Soporifics. Four weeks, three lectures, three laboratory periods a 
week. This is a special course designed to meet the needs of physi- 
cian and graduate nurse who wish to acquire a knowledge of the 
more recent developments in the pharmacology of depressant and 
sleep-producing drugs. The course is so arranged that those properly 
qualified may continue the work under expert anesthetists in the 
wards of the hospitals connected with the universit}'. Professor 
Schultz. 

5. Eesearch in Pharmacology and CHEMo-THERAPl^ Properly 
qualified students are admitted to the laboratory with a view to 
their carrying on original investigations in drug action. Thoroughly 
equipped laboratories are well adapted for post-graduate study and 
research in Pharmacology. Hours will be arranged to suit the ap- 
plicant. Professor Schultz. 



46 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

Robert B. Wright, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D Associate in Pathology 

M. Alexander Novey, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

A. A. Sussman, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Howard M. Hubert, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

M. H. Goodman, M.D Ins1:ructor in Pathology 

Walter C. Merkel, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Samuel Glick, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

W. D. Hawkins, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in Pathology are given during the second 
and third years. These courses are based on previous study of nor- 
mal structure and function and aim to outline the natural history 
of disease. Instruction is made as practical as possible that the 
student may become familiar with the appearance of tissues in 
disease and may be able to correlate anatomical lesions with clinical 
symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology and Histo-Pathology. This course is 
given to second-year students. It includes the study and demonstra- 
tion of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances of structure, 
nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of fat, carbohydrate 
and protein metabolism, disturbances in pigment metabolism, in- 
flammation and tumors. The laboratory course consists in a daily 
preliminary talk on the subject for study, following which the 
student takes up the study of microscopical sections. Gross mate- 
rial from autopsy and from the museum is demonstrated in con- 
junction with the microscopical sections. 

2. Applied Pathology, Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. Third-year students. In this course the special 
relationship of the gross and microscopical lesions to clinical symp- 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CUKRICULUM 47 

toms and signs is emphasized. Fresh material from autopsy col- 
lected at the various hospitals is demonstrated and supplemented 
by a study of the respective autopsy protocols. 

3. Autopsies. Third Year. Autopsy technique is taught to small 
groups of students by special instruction at autopsies performed 
at the various hospitals. Students are required to assist at the 
autopsy, study the organs, examine the microscopical sections, make 
cultures and prepare autopsy protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathology Conference. Fourth Year. In col- 
laboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from au- 
topsies is studied with reference to the correlation of the clinical 
aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified students 
will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work along the 
lines of experimental pathology. 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. GiCHNER, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Habvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

H. D. McCarty, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean^, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

C. C. Habliston, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D Associate in Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Associate in Medicine 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Associate in Medicine 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate in Medicine 

A. A. SussMAN, M.D Associate in Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

William Michel, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Edward Novak, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

M. G. GicHNER, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

William A. Strauss, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

W. H. Woody, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Assistant in Medicine 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

GENERAL OUTLINE 

Second Year 

Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 
(1 hour a week, first semester.) 

(2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 

I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient department 
and in the clinical laboratory. 

II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neu- 
rology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical 
therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year 

The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical exami- 
nation, laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned 
cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 

(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week.) 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University 
Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student 
spends two periods a week of two hours each in dispensary work. 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The work is done in groups of four to six students under an in- 
structor. S^^stematic history-taking is especially stressed. Physical 
findings are demonstrated. The student becomes familiar with the 
commoner acute and chronic disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in 
topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each 
section receives instruction for four hours a week for the entire 
session in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The large 
clinical material of the dispensaries and hospitals is utilized to 
give each student the opportunity to familiarize himself with the 
common types of bodily structure, with the normal variations in 
physical signs and with the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, 
circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are taken 
up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the prac- 
tical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the chief diseases 
is then reviewed. Two hours a week. Dr. Lockard. 

The principles of physical therapy are taught in a special lecture 
and demonstration course consisting of six one-hour periods. Dr. 
Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical ap- 
plication of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the chief 
therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in 
physical diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sections 
of the class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Stress is laid 
upon the recognition of the physical signs of the disease, as well 
as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis will be 
dealt with in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic management 
of syphilis will be offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D .Instructor in Medicine 

William A. Strauss, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the 
technique of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able 
to perform all routine examination which may be called for during 
his fourth year, in connection with the work in the wards and 
dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lec- 
tures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the 
department takes an active part. The microscopical and chemical 
study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric juice, spinal fluid, 
feces and urine are successively taken up, and special attention 
directed to the clinical significance of the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent 
and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has his 
own microscope and is provided with blood counters and hemo- 
globinometer for his exclusive use, and every two students with a 
special laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned 
during the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affiliated 
hospitals. He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which is 
sufficiently complete to enable him to work independently of the 
general equipment. Special instructors are available during certain 
hours to give necessary assistance and advice. 



52 ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Associate Professor of Gasi;ro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. KoppELMAN, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

N. J. Davidov, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert Eisenberg, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

I. S. ZiNBERG, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Isidore I. Levy, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Leo T. Brown, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Vance Hooper, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year, Clinics, recitations and demonstrations to the class 
for one hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary instruction 
to small groups throughout the entire session. Practical instruction 
in the differential and clinical diagnosis and demonstrations of the 
newer methods of diagnosis in gastro-intestinal affections. 

PSYCHIATRY 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen clinical 
lectures and five clinics which are designed to be introductory to 
the more intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical con- 
ferences on selected groups of cases. Each student may work for a 
short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic, and thus 
gain practical experience of the problems of history-taking, exami- 
nation, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



53 



PEDIATRICS 



Charles L. Summers, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

C. LoRixG JosLiN, M.D Clinical Professor of Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

William J. Todd, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Obem, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

William G. Geyer, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

George A. Knipp, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Bernard J. Ferry, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

I. J. Feinglos, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

R. M. Hening, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Marie Kovneb, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Clewell Howeld, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Samuel Click, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

M. N. Putterman, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Louis T. Lavy, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Benjamin Miller, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

E. V. Teagarden, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

S. C. Feldman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 



Third Year. Instruction during the tliird year consists of one 
lecture each week in which infant feeding and the most important 
diseases of infancy and childhood are especially emphasized. Drs. 
Summers and Friedenwald. 



Fourth Year. During this year a weekly clinical lecture is given 
where the character of disease is fully demonstrated and the stu- 
dents are afforded an opportunity for personal examination of all 
cases. In addition, ward classes are held weekly where bedside in- 
struction is given. A section of the class also works daily at the 
Babies' and Children's Clinic. This clinic, which is under the di- 
rection of Dr. Summers, has a yearly attendance of more than 
twenty thousand, and offers an excellent opportunity for study and 
observation of a wide variety of cases under competent instructors. 

Instruction is also given on the Children's Ward at the Mercy 
Hospital. 



54 ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., 

Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology 

MiLFORD Levy, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Robert Hodes, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week to the 
entire class. Instruction in clinical neurology two hours a week 
at the City Hospital to small groups. By means of didactic lectures 
and clinical conferences, there are considered the commoner types 
of diseases of the nervous system, the methods of neurological 
examination, and the relationship of signs and symptoms to patho- 
logical conditions. The material at the University and Mercy Hos- 
pitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the en- 
tire class. This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hos- 
pitals. All cases presented at these clinics are carefully examined; 
complete written records are made by the students who demonstrate 
the cases before the class. The cases are usually assigned one or 
two weeks before they are presented, and each student in the class 
must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close 
personal contact with the cases in the wards under the supervision 
of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four afternoons 
each week. In this way students are brought into contact with 
nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later manifestations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

M. G. TuLL, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 55 

TMrd Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. The 
lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: air, water, soil, 
food, disposal of wastes, communicable diseases, state and federal 
public health laws, and industrial diseases. Small groups visit the 
Sydenham Hospital weekly and are given practical instruction in 
the diagnosis, treatment and isolation of the contagious diseases. 

Fourth Year. Small groups visit the City Board of Health Lab- 
oratories for practical instruction in the laboratory, field and ad- 
ministrative aspects of public health work. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. One hour each week for one semester. 

Inasmuch as Medical Jurisprudence teaches the application of 
every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, civil or 
criminal, this course embraces the following: Proceedings in crimi- 
nal and civil prosecution ; medical evidence and testimonj^ ; identity 
in its general relations; sexual abnormalities; personal identity; 
impotence and sterility; rape; criminal abortions; signs of death; 
wounds in their medico-legal relations; death, natural and homi- 
cidal; malpractice; insanity and medico-legal autopsies. 



56 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Elliot H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D. . . .Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Surgery 

E. S. Johnson, M.D Associate in Surgery 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate in Surgery 

M. J. Hanna, M.D Associate in Surgery 

H. M. Foster), M.D Associate in Surgery 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate in Surgery 

C. F. HoKiNE, M.D ^ Instructor in Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

I. O. Ridgely, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

H, F. BoNGARDT, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Dwight Mohr, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. R, Geraghty, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde Mar\-el, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. M. McElwain, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

James Brown, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. BuCHNESS, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Thomas B. Aycock, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the Anatomical Laboratory and the dis- 
pensaries, wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the 
University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and dead-house 
of the Baltimore City Hospital. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispensary 
work, bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The work 
begins in the second year, and continues throughout the third and 
fourth years. 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 57 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. Ten hours a week for the 
fust semester. The course is designed to bridge the gap between 
anatomy in the abstract, and clinical anatomy as applied to the 
study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students 
are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the 
cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected when necessary to bring- 
out outlines and relations of structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, aug- 
mented by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross section. 
Dr. Holland. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours a week for 8 weeks. Dr. Hanna, 
assisted by Drs. Brady, Uundley, Boyd, Jacobson, and Mr. Clark. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, 
records of physical examinations and of operations and progress 
notes; the preparation of surgical dressings, suture materials and 
solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, 
fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage and shock; the use of splints, bed 
frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local anaesthesia and the 
preparation of patients for operations. Lectures and conferences. 
Two hours per week for one semester to the entire class. Dr. 
Edwards. 

Third Year 

General and Eegional Surgery. Principles of surgery and gen- 
eral surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the entire 
class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Dr. Shipley. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in histor^^- 
taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the bedside and 
in the dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospital. Drs. Shipley, 
Lynn and Beifschneider. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery 
upon the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, 
and each section is given practical and individual work under the 
supervision of the instructors. Dr. Frank S. Lynn, assisted by Drs. 
Nathan Winslow, Hayward, E, S. Johnson, Foster, Geraghty, 



58 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Demarco, Horine, Pessagno, Onnen, Maxson, W. E. Johnson, Buch- 
ness, Hanralian, Brown, Steinmneller, Sigrist, Walker and Jensen. 

Fractures and Dislocations. Twenty-four hours to the entire 
class. This course consists of instruction in the various forms of 
fractures and dislocations and their treatment, and serves as a 
preparatory course for clinical work. Drs. Wise and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes the 
history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diagnosis, 
and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of the ambulatory 
surgical cases in the University and in the Mercy Hospitals. Mercy 
Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Kidgely, Passagno, Bongardt and 
McElwain. University Hospital — Drs. Holland, Lynn, Nathan 
Winslow, Edwards, E. S. Johnson and Foster. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic will be given at the Mercy and at the 
University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. As 
far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — Dr. 
McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the operating- 
room and museum are studied in the gross and microscopically, in 
relation with the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment of 
accident cases, with instructions as to the relationship between the 
state, the employee, the employer, and the physician's duty to each. 
One hour a week to sections of the class throughout the year. Dr. 
Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of University and of Mercy 
Hospitals, history-taking, and physical examination of patients, 
laboratory examinations, attendance at operations and observation 
of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will con- 
sist of ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the after-care 
of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlannan, Wise, Elliot 
Hutchins, Evans and Jennings. University Hospital — Drs. Shipley, 
Holland, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 59 

ANAESTHESIA 

Second Year 

Lectures on history of anaesthesia : Ancient and Modern. General 
physiology of anaesthesia. Special physiology of each anaesthetic 
agent. Different methods for producing general anaesthesia, with 
a detailed description of each. The selection of the anaesthetic and 
method best suited for its administration in particular cases. Diffi- 
culties and accidents during and following anaesthesia, their causes, 
prevention and control. Different methods of resuscitation. Blood 
pressure : Its significance and bearing on selection of the anaesthetic 
and use as a guide during anaesthesia. 

Eight hours to the entire class. Drs. S. Griffith Davis and W. G. 
Queen. 

Fourth Year 

During the clinics and operations before small groups, each stu- 
dent will be required to observe the administration of anaesthetics 
and to keep a chart recording blood pressure, pulse and respiration 
under the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

A. C. MoNNiNGER, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Harry Wasserman, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of the 
skin. 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital, Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the common 
skin diseases. Drs. Abercrombie, Robinson and Gately. Dispensary 
instruction, Mercy Hospital. Dr. Eosenthal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 



60 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Clement R. Monroe, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, B.S., M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Arnold Lawson Jensen, B.Sc, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary and 
Kernan Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children at 
''Radnor Park" and in the Dispensary of the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics will be held at each of the hospitals named 
in town once a week. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic will be 
held for small sections of the class at '^Radnor Park" and Mercy 
Hospital. Sectional quizzes are held at stated intervals with mid- 
year and final examinations. 

The course will cover instruction in the special methods of exami- 
nation, pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. X-ray 
interpretation will be stressed. The lectures will cover: 

Tuberculosis of the spine, bones and joints; non-tuberculous affec- 
tions of the spine, bones and joints; fractures, non-union, mal-union, 
pyogenic infections, malignancy, abnormalities and the arthritides. 
Arthrodesis and arthrolysis. Rickets and scurvy. Osteomalacia, 
chondrodystrophies and osteitis deformans. Torticollis and the 
paralyses. Bursal, tendinous and muscular affections. Surgery of 
the hands and feet. 

A brief outline and demonstration will also be given of the 
apparatus employed in Physiotherapy in using Actinotherapy, Ther- 
motherapy. Electrotherapy, Hydrotherapy, Massage and Corrective 
Gymnastics in treating bone, joint and muscular disabilities. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

AxBERTus Cotton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D Assistant in Roentgenology 

An effort is made to familiarize the student with the appearance 
of normal Roentgenograms, after which instruction is given in the 
interpretation of the more common pathological lesions seen on the 
X-ray films and fluoroscopic screen. The history, physics and prac- 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 61 

tical application of Roentgen Rays are alluded to, but not stressed. 
Weekly demonstrations are given to sections of the fourth year class. 

DIATHERMY AND RADIUM THERAPY 

Charles Reid Edwards_, M.D., 
Associate Professor of Surgery 

Students are taken in groups and are taught the indications for 
the use of radium in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant 
conditions. The course also includes the use of diathermy in the 
treatment of disease. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE 

Edward A. Loopee, M.D. . .Clinical Prof, of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. .Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common 
diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially directed 
to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance of focal infec- 
tions in the etiology of general diseases and modern methods of 
diagnosis. Lectures are illustrated by lantern slides. Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily to small sections at 
the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student is given oppor- 
tunity to study, diagnose and treat practical cases under an instruc- 
tor. Ward classes and clinical demonstrations are given one and 
one-half hours weekly throughout the session in the University and 
the Mercy Hospitals. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. GiLLis, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Harris Goldman, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Austin H. Wood, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. C. Knapp, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary 



62 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

H. T. CoLLENBERG, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

J. H. CoLLisoN, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. J. MiLLAx, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

William Emrich, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

K. D. Legge, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

TMrd Year. Eight hours to the entire class. This course is a 
didactic one in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. 
Toulson. 

Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystoscopy, 
ureter catheterization, renal functional tests, urography, urine cul- 
tures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the amphitheater, ward 
rounds, and attendance by members of the Senior class upon our 
patients in the dispensary. The dispensary classes are carried on 
both at the Mercy and the University Hospital dispensaries. In the 
latter institution the Maryland State Department of Health con- 
ducts a venereal-disease clinic, in which 20,133 visits were paid last 
year. Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered, and this 
rich wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. In addi- 
tion to this, a cystoscopic clinic is conducted in another part of the 
dispensary, where the students are given practical instruction in the 
modern diagnostic methods. 
V 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM 

G. Milton Lixthicum, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
L. J. Rosenthal, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Monte Edwards. M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

TMrd Year. Six hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum and 
anus, and \nl\ cover the essential features of the anatomy and 
physiology of the large intestine as well as the various diseases to 
which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 63 

The class is divided into sections for clinical instruction in the 
Baltimore City Hospital. Dr. Linthicum. 

Fourth Year. Ward and Dispensary instruction is given in the 
University and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of the 
various diseases are taught by direct observation and examination. 
The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope and examination of 
the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar to each student. Mercy 
Hospital — Drs. Blake and Rosenthal. University Hospital — Drs. 
Linthicum and Reeder. 

BRONCHOSCOPY AND ESOPHAGOSCOPY 

Waitman F. Zinn^ M.D. 
Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Clinical Lectures and Demonstrations once weekly at Univer- 
sity and Mercy Hospitals. 

Etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis and prophylaxis of foreign 
bodies in the air and food passages. Bronchoscopy as an aid in the 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs. Bronchoscopy as 
an aid to the surgeon. Diseases of the trachea. Diseases of the 
esophagus. All the phases of these subjects that the general prac- 
titioner should know are demonstrated clinically. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E, Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

J. McF. Bergland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

M. A. No\t:y, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Dudley Pleasants Bowe, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

J. J. Erwix, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Isadore a. Siegel, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Maurice Shamer, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Knight Reynolds, B.S., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 



64 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by Drs. 
Bergland, Novak, Murray, Douglass and Kowland to entire class. 
Manikin Work, Drs. Brack, Smith and Erwin to sections of class at 
Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Keese, Novey, Siegel and 
Eowland at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week. Drs. 
Kowland, Douglass, Murray and Lazenby. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sections of 
class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese, Novey, Reynolds 
and Rowland. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Work. A course of thirty lectures and 
recitations. 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward, makes a general physical examination, including the blood and 
urine, before the patient is brought before the class. One student 
under supervision gives the anaesthetic, a pelvic examination is made 
by six students, and any operation required is then done before a 
section of the class small enough to see clearly what is being done 
and how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole group examines, 
microscopically, sections prepared from material removed from 
patients that have been before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Dow^-EY, M.D Clinical Professor of Otology 

M. Raxdolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate In Ophthalmology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 65 

Third Year. First semester, Course in Diseases of the Eye. 
Dr. Kandolph Kahn. Second semester, Course in Diseases of the 
Ear. Dr. Downey. 

Practical Course in Ophthalmoscopy_, once weekly, in sections. 
Dr. Kemler. 

Fourth Year. Clinics in Diseases of the Eye and Ear_, weekly. 
Drs. Harry Friedenwald and Downey. 

Ward Studies of ocular and aural lesions associated with general 
medical diseases, once weekly in sections. Dr. Friedenwald. 

Dispensary Instruction^, daily to small sections. Drs. Downey, 
Kahn, Fleck and Kemler. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are designed to 
familiarize the students with the common diseases of the eye and 
ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view to meet the needs 
of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is laid upon the rela- 
tion between diseases of the eye and the ear and systemic diseases 
and diseases of other organs. 



THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver^ A.B., M.D., Ph.D. 
Professor of the Hi story of Medicine 

During the past year a series of lectures was given from March 
to May, inclusive. It was found impossible to get together a group 
of students for seminary work but this idea is not given up but 
merely postponed. The lectures of this year began with the later 
years of the Revival of Learning and have dealt chiefly with the 
Seventeenth Century. Harvey, von Helmont and Sydenham have 
been studied in detail as w^ell as the beginnings of medical life and 
practice in the American Colonies. Next year we hope to cover the 
Eighteenth and at least the first half of the Nineteenth Century. 
Our present scheme is to cover the entire field of the History of 
Medicine in four series of lectures so that each medical student if 
he attends every year will have at the end of his four year course a 
fairly complete review of the History of Medicine. As formerly, 



66 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

the lectures this year have been illustrated with lantern slides and 
the thanks of the Department are especially due to the Surgeon 
General's Library in Washington which has allowed us to photo- 
graph some of their valuable items for our slides. During the lec- 
tures also the students have been allowed to handle and look through 
copies of the most important works of all those medical authors who 
have been mentioned in the lectures. 







SCHEDULE 

FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

SESSION 1928-1929 




67 


Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

9-10 


Histology 

And 

Embryology 

Laboratory 
and 
C.H. 


Histology 

And 

Embryology 

Laboratory 


Histology 

And 

Embryology 

Laboratory 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 
Section A. 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 
Section B. 


Oct. 1, 1928 
To 

Apr. 1, 1929 


10-11 


Anatomy 


11 to 12 


Physiology 
C.H. 


Laboratory 
and 
C.H. 


12 M. 

to 

1P.M. 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


AFTERNOON SCHEDULE 
FROM OCTOBER 1, 1928, TO APRIL 1, 1929 


1-2 


Anatomy 
Laboratory 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 

Laboratory 

A.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 








2-3 


Anatomy 
Laboratory 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
Laboratory 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
Laboratory 
C. H. & A. H. 




' 8-4 




t 

4-5 




AFTERNOON SCHEDULE 
FROM APRIL 2, 1929, TO END OF SCHOOL YEAR 


"\ 1-2 


Neural 
Anatomy 

Laboratory 


Neural 
Anatomy 

Laboratory 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 




\ 2-3 


Physiology 
C.H. 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 

Section A. 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 

Section B. 




S-4 








il 





LOCATIONS OF LECTURE HALLS AND LABORATORIES: 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

C. H.^Chemical Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and Greene Streets.. 

Histology and Embryology Laboratory — 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 



SCHEDULE 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— First Semester, 1928-1929 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

9-10 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A. 

Pharmacology 
Section B. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B. 

Pharmacology 
Section A. 


No Classes 
Scheduled 


10-11 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 




11 to 12 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Bacteriology 
A.H. 




12 M. 

to 

12.30 P. M. 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(12-1 P.M.) 
Lunch 


(12-1 P.M.) 
Lunch 


(12-1 P.M.) 
Lunch 




12.30 
1.30 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


(1-2 P. M.) 

Medicine 

A. H. 


(1-2 P. M.) 

Surgery 

A.H. 


(1-2 P. M.) 

Surgery 

A.H. 




1.30 
2.30 




(2-4 P.M.) 
Bacteriology 

Laboratory 


(2-4 P.M.) 
Bacteriology 

Laboratory 


(2-4 P.M.) 

Physical 

Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 

Disp. 




2.30 
3.30 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A. 

Pharmacology 
Section B. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B. 

Pharmacology 
Section A. 




3.30 
4.30 

4.30 
5.30 













SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE— Second Semester, 1928-1929 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 
9.30 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
A.H. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A. 

Pharmacology 
Section B. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B. 

Pharmacology 
Section A. 




9.30 
10.30 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 


Pharmacology 
A.H. 




10.30 
11.30 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Immunology 
A.H. 




11.30 
12 M. 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(11-12 M.) 
Surgical 
Anatomy 


12-1 P. M. 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


A.H. 


(12-1 P.M.) 


1-2 


Medical 
Clinic 


t- 


2-3 


Immunology 
Laboratory 


Immunology 
Laboratory 


Immunology 
Laboratory 


Immunology 
Laboratory 




Amp. 


•E 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

A.H. 




t 


3-4 










s. 


4-5 




1 


2-3 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

A.H. 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Laboratory 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Laboratory 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

A.H. 




3-4 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Laboratory 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Laboratory 




< 


4-5 





A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H.— Chemical Hall — Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Laboratories : 

Bacteriology— Sixth Floor, 32-34 S. Paca Street. 

Immunology— Sixth Floor, 32-34 S. Paca Street. 

Pathology — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Surgical Anatomy — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Univ. Hosp. Disp. — Dispensary, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 



SCHEDULE 



69 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SESSION 1928-1929 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Pathology 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Obstetrics 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Therapeutics 
C.H. 


10.30 to 
1 P.M. 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 

Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 
Lunch 


1 to 2 


Medical 
CUnic 
Amp. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 34 


Gynecology 

P. & S. 34 


1.15 to 4.15 

Clinical 
Pathology 
Laboratory 


Transfer 


2.15 to 
3.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


2.30-4.30 

Section A 

Clinical 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


*2 to 3.15 

Eye 
P. & S. 34 


2-4 
Section B 
Clinical 
Medicine 


3.15 to 
4.15 


Clinical 
Pathology 
P. & S. 34 


32-34 
S. Paca St. 
6th Floor 


Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


4.15 
to 
5.15 


Pediatrics 
A.H. 


♦Obstetrics 
C.H. 

**Ear 
C.H. 


2.15-4.15 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
Practical 
Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 

Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 

P. & S. 34 


Preventive 

Medicine 

C.H. 





From 10.30 A. M. to 1.00 P. M. the class is divided into two sections, one section reporting at 
Calvert and Saratoga Streets, the other at Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 

At the beginning of the second semester Section "A" at Bay View on Saturdays, 2-4 P M and 
University Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.15-4.15 P. M. : Section "B" at Bay View on Wednesdays, 

* First Semester. »^ 

*• Second Semester. 



70 



SCHEDULE 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

SESSION 1928-1929 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


"Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A M 


tVard Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


iVard Classes 


Ward Classes 


8.30 to 
11.00 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 
Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 






Medical 












Orthopaedic 


CUnic 


Clinical 


Surgical 


Medical 


Pediatrics 


11.00 


Surgery 


Uniy.Sec.Amp 




Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


to 






Conference 








12.00 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Surgical 


Univ.Sec.C.H. 
P. & S. Sec. 84 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 




P. & S. Sec. 51 


Pathology 
P. & S. Sec. 40 


P. & S. Sec. 51 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec 34 




Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 






Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


Dispensary 


12.00 to 2 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 


Lvmch 


Transfer 






Dermatology 


Neurology 
Clinic 


Eye and Ear 


Obstetrical 


Gastro-Enter- 




2.16 
to 


Clinic 
(Full Class at 


Clinic 
(Full Class at 


Clinic 
(Full Class at 


ology Clinic 
(Full Class at 


Genito- 

Urinary 

Clinic 

P. & S. Sec 51 


3.15 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec 34 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp. ) 




Amp. 




Amp. 


Amp. 


Amp. 














Ward Classes 










P. & S. Sec. 


iVard Classes 








P. & S. Sec. 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 




Neurology 




8.30 


Ward Classes 








Psychiatry 




to 




Therapeutics 


Medicine 


Mose & Throat 


U. H. 




6.00 


Medicine 
Urology 


Proctology 

Radiotherapy 


Roentgenology 
Preventive 


Physical 


Orthopaedic 
Surgery 






Eye and Ear 




Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Keman 
Hospital 












5 to 6 P. M. 








Univ. Sec. 




Univ. Sec. 


March, 






8.80 


Ward Classes 




Ward Classes 


April and 
May 






to 

6.00 


Medicine 




Medicine 






Urology 




Roentgenology 


History of 












Eye and Ear 


Medicine 
C. H. 












„^_^^. ., ^ 









The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
the other at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. These 
groups will rotate on the following dates: 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

1st period, Oct, 1 — Nov. 3. 1st period, Jan. 28 — Mar. 2. 

2nd period, Nov. 5 — Dec. 8. 2nd period. Mar. 4 — April 6. 

Srd period, Dec. 10 — Jan. 26. 3rd period, April 8 — May 11. 

C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 
P. & S., 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51— Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 71 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Registrar on the 
basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and is essential for 
admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical Stu- 
dent Certificate are : 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or 
the equivalent, and, in addition, at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits, including 
chemistry, biology, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this University. 

(A) HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation from an accredited high or preparatory school, after 
pursuing a four-year course based upon an eight-year elementary 
course, or its full equivalent as demonstrated by entrance examina- 
tions. 

At least fifteen units must be offered.! 



SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED OR ACCEPTED 

FOR ENTRANCE TO THE PREMEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Subjects Units* Required 

Group I, English— (I— II— III— IV) — 

Literature and Composition 3 3 

Group II, Foreign Languages — 

Latin 2-4 1 

Greek 2-3 I 

French or German 2-4 | ^ 

Other foreign languages 2-4 J 

Group III, Mathematics — 

Elementary algebra 1 1 

Advanced algebra ^.-1 

Plane geometry 1 1 

Solid geometry i^ 

Trigonometry i^ 



72 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 



Gboup IV, History and Economics — 

Ancient history 1 

Medieval and modern history 1 

English history 1 

American history i^-l 

Civil government %-l 

Economics %-l 

Group V, Science — 

Botany %-l 

Zoology 1^-1 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Physiography i^-l 

Physiology i^-l 

Astronomy % 

Geology %-l 

Group VI, Miscellaneous — 

Vocational — including agriculture, commercial, home 

economics, industrial, etc 1-4 



*A unit is the credit value of at least thirty-six weeks' work of four or 
five recitation periods per week, each recitation period to be not less than 
forty minutes. In other words, a unit represents a year's study in any 
subject in a secondary school constituting approximately a quarter of a full 
year's work. A satisfactory year's work in any subject cannot be accom- 
plished under ordinary circumstances in less than 120 sixty-minute hours, 
or their equivalent. 

fBoth of the required units of foreign language must be of the same 
language, but the two units may be presented in any one of the languages 
specified. 

JOf the fifteen units of high school work, nine units are required, as 
indicated in the foregoing schedule; the remainder may be made up from any 
of the other subjects in the schedule, provided that at least eleven units 
must be offered in Groups I-V. 



(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two college 
sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual instruction, 
including final examinations. 

&. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this pre- 
liminary college course shall be equal to the work done in the fresh- 
man and sophomore years in standard colleges and universities. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 73 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in physics, 
chemistry, biology and English, each course to embrace at least six, 
eight or twelve hours of work in each subject, as shown in the 
schedule following: 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PREMEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Semester 
Required Courses: Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 

A modern foreign language 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy 
Psychology 
Social science 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of 
one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less than 
fifty minutes' duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work to be 
considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required of which at least 
eight semester hours must be in general inorganic chemistry, includ- 
ing four semester hours of laboratory w^ork, and four semester hours 
in organic chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis 
may be counted as general inorganic chemistry. 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at least 
two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes a knowledge 
of plane trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four must 
be laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course 
of eight semester hours in either general biology or zoology, or by 
courses of four semester hours each in zoology and botany, but not 
by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual introduc- 
tory college course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, is 
required. 



74 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum is offered, leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first 
three years are taken in residence at College Park, and the last four 
years in Baltimore, at the School of Medicine. The premedical cur- 
riculum constitutes the first two years' work, and the third year 
follows a general outline of prescribed and elective courses approved 
by the chairman of the premedical committee and the dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of 
Medicine, and upon the recommendation of the dean, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the College of Arts and 
Sciences at College Park. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this com- 
bination course offers over the minimum requirements of the two 
years. By completing three years the training may be gradually 
broadened by a wider latitude in the election of courses in the arts 
subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior 
year without being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, with- 
out examination, may receive a certificate of attendance on com- 
pleting the full course satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth-year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
are the same as those enforced against undergraduates admitted to 
advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses — In the April number of the 
Bulletin detailed announcement will be made of the Post-Graduate 
Summer Courses. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course, 
he must pay regular fees. 



RULES AND FEES 75 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at the 
end of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of 
the fourth year and to take examination in such other branches as 
may be required should he again be permitted to enter the school as 
a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his 
examination. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the University 
of Maryland are required to provide themselves with microscopes 
of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spencer 
Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, will fill 
the requirements : 

Triple nose piece 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe) 1.9mm. 1.25 N.A. Oil Immersion 

Lens 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 8th, 1921>, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, the requirements for graduation, the 
fees and in any of the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it 
expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 300.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 450.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 20.00 

Special and re-examination fee 5.00 

Graduation fee 15.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution in any class for the session beginning October 1st, 1928. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register 
at the Registrar's Office. The last date of registration is October 
8th, 1928. 



76 RULES AND FEES 

Matriculation, laboratory and tuition fees for the first semester 
shall be paid at the time of registration, and for the second semester 
on or before February 2nd, 1929. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar the 
student from attendance on classes and other privileges of the 
University. 

Students who fail to pay the tuition and other fees on or before 
the last day of registration for each term or semester, as stated in 
the catalogue, will be required to pay as an addition to the fees 
required the sum of Five (^5.00) Dollars, and if the payment so 
required shall not be paid before twenty (20) days from the begin- 
ning of said term or semester, the student's name shall be stricken 
from the rolls. 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, 
if at the time of their registration their parents or guardians have 
been residents of this state for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their first registration they have been residents of this state 
for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time 
of his first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be 
changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents or guar- 
dians move to and become legal residents of this state. 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 77 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the high- 
est average during the four years of his course. Certificates of 
Honor are awarded to the five candidates standing next highest. 

DR. JOSE L. HIRSH MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $50.00 is given each year by Mrs. David Myers as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsh, formerly Professor of 
Pathology in this School, to the student in the third year who has 
done the most satisfactory work in Patholog}' during his second and 
third years. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of 
this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University each year upon nomination by the Medical Council "to 
a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student who has successfully completed one year's work in this 
school, and no student may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 
(Value, $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School 
of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of 
the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the 
Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by the Medical 



78 SCHOLARSHIPS 

Council to students who have meritoriously completed the work of 
at least the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to 
the Faculty satisfactory evidence of a good moral character and of 
inability to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 

(Value, $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Kandolph Winslow, 
M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to a 
^'needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the 
Medical School." 

^'He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

^'He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship 

(Value, $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky 
as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an 
alumnus of this University. 

The scholarship is awarded to a second-year student who at the 
end of the first year passes the best examination in Anatomy, 
Histology, Embryology and Bacteriology. 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University. One to a student 
of the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the President, to 
be held for only one year; the other, which entitles the holder to 
exemption from payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded 
annually by the Medical Council to a student of the Senior Class 
who presents to the Medical Council satisfactory evidence that he is 
of good moral character and is worthy of and in need of assistance 
to complete the course. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 79 

Frederica Gehmiann Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late Mrs. 
Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to a third-year 
student who at the end of the second year passes the best practical 
examination in Anatomy, Physiology, Biological Chemistry, Phar- 
macology, Pathology, Immunology and Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 

(Valuation, $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from the 
income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships will be available to 
students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. Preference 
is given to students from the counties of the State of Maryland 
which the Medical Council may from time to time determine to be 
most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, after gradu- 
ation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the practice of 
medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to which the student 
is accredited or in a county selected by the Council. In the event 
that a student is not able to comply with the condition requiring him 
to practice in the county to which he is accredited by the Council, 
the money advanced by the Eegents shall be refunded. 

Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen Scholarship 

(Value, $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in 
memory of her parents, Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen. Terms and 
conditions : 

This scholarship will be available to students of any one of the 
classes of the course in Medicine; preference is given to students of 
the counties of the State of Maryland which the Medical Council 
may from time to time determine to be most in need of medical prac- 
titioners. Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, 
after graduation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the 
practice of medicine for a term of two years in the county to which 
the student is accredited, or in a county selected by the Council. 



80 HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

On February 1st of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school : 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons Two Resident Obstetricians 

Two Resident Physicians Thirteen Junior Residents on a 

One Resident Gynecologist Rotating Service 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for the 
summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician One Resident Gynecologist 

One Assistant Resident Physician One Resident Obstetrician 

Chief Resident Surgeon Eight Junior Residents on a Rotat- 

Five Assistant Resident Surgeons ing Service 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 81 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in Balti- 
more as in any large city in the United States. The following esti- 
mates of a student's personal expenses for the academic year of eight 
months have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual 
experience ; 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 75 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Secretary 
of Student Y. M. C. A., who may be found at his office on the 
premises, will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient 
boarding-houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland^ M.D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



MATRICULATES— 1927-28 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, 1927-1928 



FOURTH 

Baer, Adolph New York 

Bailey, Hugh Alvin, A.B. . . .South Carolina 

Bedri, Marcel Rechtman Palestine 

Berger, William Adolph, B.S...New Jersey 

Blecher, Irving Ezra New York 

Bonelli, Nicholas WiUiam, A.B..New Jersey 

Brager, Simon Maryland 

Ohor, Herman, A.B Maryland 

Christian, William Pennsylvania 

Clemson, Earle Princeton Maryland 

Duckwall, Frederick Mooman, 

West Virginia 
Duncan, George Andrew, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Friedman, Bernard New York 

Garred, Herbert WiUiam D., B.S., 

West Virginia 

Gilbert, Jacques Saul Rhode Island 

George, Jessie Ethelvryn, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Goldberg, Victor, Ph.G Maryland 

Goodman, Jerome Edward, Ph.G . Maryland 

Greer, Creed CoUins, B.S West Virginia 

Grollman, Aaron Isaac, A.B Maryland 

Giilck, Georg Krohn, B.S Denmark 

Gundry, Lewis Perkins, A.B Maryland 

Hankin, Samuel Jay Maryland 

Hayes, Paul Maryland 

Herold, Lewis Jacob, Ph.G New York 

Johnson, Walter Brenaman, A.B.. Maryland 

Jones, Henry Alvan, Ph.G Maryland 

Kaufman, Israel, B.S New York 

Kaye, Philip Louis New York 

Kohn, Theodore, B.S South Carolina 

Kotch, Nathan Hersh New York 

Lampert, Hyman New York 

Lamstein, Jacob Irwin, B.S New York 

Laukaitis, Joseph George Maryland 

Lerner, Morris New York 

Levinsky, Maurice Connecticut 

Levinson, Louis Jack New York 

Limbach, Earl Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Litsinger, Edward Andrew, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Little, Luther Emanuel, Ph.G. .. .Maryland 

Littman, Irving Isaac Maryland 

Lyon, Isadore Bernard, A.B Maryland 

Mace, John, Jr., B.S Maryland 

Maddi, Vincent Michael, A.B New York 

Maged, Alan John, A.B New York 

McCeney, Robert Sadler, A.B Maryland 



YEAR CLASS 

McDowell, Roy Hendrix, A.B., 

North Carolina 
McFaul, William Neal, Jr., A.B. .Maryland 
McGee, William Buster, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Mee, Robert Amos, A.B., B.S., 

New Hampshire 

Meister, Aaron New York 

Merksamer, David, A.B New York 

Merlino, Frank Anthony New Jersey 

Messina, Vincent Michael Maryland 

Mostwill. Ralph New Jersey 

Piacentine, Pasquale Anthony ... New York 

Pileggi, Peter New Jersey 

Rascoff, Henry Morris New York 

Rich, Benjamin Sunderland, A.B.Maryland 

Roetling, Carl Paul Maryland 

Rosen, Marks Julius New York 

Rubinstein, Hyman Solomon, Ph.G., 

Maryland 

Rutter, Joseph Howard Florida 

Saffron, Morris Harold, A.B New Jersey 

Sardo, Samuel Robert, B.S... .Pennsylvania 

Shaw, Cecil Curry, A.B Alabama 

Silver, Abraham Alfred Connecticut 

Singer, Jack Jerome Maryland 

Smoot, Aubrey Cannon, A.B Mai-yland 

Smoot, Merrill Clayvelle, B.S Maryland 

Stacy, Theodore Edwin, Jr., Ph.G., 

Maryland 

*Tannenbaum, Morris, B.S New York 

Taylor, Charles Vivian, A.B Maryland 

Temple, Levi V/ade, Jr., B.S., 

South Carolina 

Tenner, David, Ph.G Mai-yland 

Varney, William Henry Maryland 

VeiTiaglia, Anthony Paul New York 

Vogel, S. Zachary New York 

Warner, Carroll Gardner, A.B Maryland 

Weintraub, Fred Siegfried, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Weisenfeld, Nathan, B.S Connecticut 

Weiss, Aaron New York 

Wells, Samuel Robert, B.S..West Virginia 
Wilkerson, Albert Russell, Ph.G. . .Maryland 

Wolf, Frederick Samuel Maryland 

Wurzel, Milton New Jersey 

Yarbrough, Oscar DeMelle Alabama 

Zimmerman, Frederick Thomas, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 



♦Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES— 1927-28 



83 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 



Abramowitz, Max, B.S New York 

Ackerman, Jacob Harold, A.B...New York 

Alessi, Silvio A., Ph.G Maryland 

Amos, Hugh, B.S Ohio 

Anderson, Walter Anders, Ph.G., D.D.S., 

Maryland 

Bardfeld, Benjamin B New Jersey 

Barland, Samuel, Jr., B.S New York 

Birely, Morris Fi-anklin, A.B Maryland 

Bongiorno, Henry Domenic, Ph.G., 

New Jersey 

Botsch, Bernard, B.S Ohio 

Bowen, James Poore, B.S.. South Carolina 

Brauer, Selig Leo New Jersey 

Galas, Andres Eladio Cuba 

Chambers, Earl LeRoy Maryland 

Chapman, William Hardee Maryland 

Ciccone, Arnold William Rhode Island 

Clark, Francis Alden, B.S... West Virginia 

Cohen, Herman New Jersey 

Cohen, Paul Henry, A.B Maryland 

Conn, Jacob Harry, A.B Maryland 

Corsello, Joseph Nicholas, B.S... New York 

Dailey, William Paul Pennsylvania 

Daniels, Willard Floyd, B.S., 

West Virginia 
DeBarbieri, Fred Louis, A.B. .Pennsylvania 

Draper, William Bateman Maryland 

Farbman, Meyer David, B.S New York 

Fargo, William Russell, A.B Maryland 

Fattel, Henry Charles, B.S New Jersey 

Feingold, Charles Rodin, B.S New York 

Feit, Emanuel, B.S New York 

Fifer, Jesse Showalter, A.B Delaware 

Garber, Jacob S New York 

Givner, David, A.B Maryland 

Gouldman, Edwin Foster, B.S Virginia 

Guiglia, Sascha Facchetti New York 

Haney, John James New Jersey 

Heck, Leroy Savin, B.S Maryland 

Helms, Samuel Thomas, B.S Virginia 

Holroyd, Frank Jackson, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 

Horowitz, Morris, A.B Massachusetts 

Husted, Samuel Harley New Jersey 

Isern, Rafael Angel Vilar, B.S. .Porto Rico 

Jackson, Murray Elliot, B.S New York 

Jacobs, Abraham, B.S New York 

Kelly, Clyde Ernest, A.B Pennsylvania 

Kendall^ Benjamin Horton, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Knight, Walter Phillips Pennsylvania 



Levi, Ernest, Ph.G Maryland 

Levy, Walter Howard New York 

Lynn, Irving, B.S New Jersey 

Lynn, John Galloway, 4th Maryland 

Matsumura, Junichi Hawaii 

McAndrew, Joseph Theodore. West Virginia 
McGowan, Joseph F-rancis. .. .Pennsylvania 

Meranski, Israel Peter, B.S Connecticut 

Morgan, Isaac Joseph, B.S. . .Pennsylvania 
Moser, Charles Yarnall, B.S. West Virginia 

Murphy, John Edward Pennsylvania 

Neistadt, Isidore Irving, A.B Maryland 

Neuman, Finley Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Newman, Saul Charles, B.S. .. .Connecticut 
Nickman, Emanuel Harrison.. .New Jersey 

O'Dea, John Francis, A.B New York 

Overton, Lewis Marvin, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Penchansky, Samuel Joseph, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Porterfield, Maurice Coleman Maryland 

Prager, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Reeder, Paul Arlington, B.S. West Virginia 

Reilly, John Vincent New Jersey 

Roberts, Eldred, B.S Maryland 

Safer, Jake Victor Florida 

Safford, Henry Towne, Jr Texas 

Schreiber, Morris Bernard New York 

Schwartzbach, Saul, A.B., 

District of Columbia 

Seibel, Jack, B.S New York 

Sekerak, Raymond Andrew Connecticut 

Serra, Lawrence Mario, Ph.G. .. .Maryland 
Sikorsky, Albert Edward, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Silver, Mabel Irene, B.S Maryland 

Soifer, Albert Alexander, B.S Maryland 

Solomon, Milton, B.S New York 

Speicher, Wilbur Glenn Maryland 

Spencer, Ernest Maryland 

Spurrier, Oliver Walter, A.B Maryland 

Staton, Leon Raphael, A.B. North Carolina 

Stevenson, Charles Calvert Utah 

Sullivan, William Joseph Rhode Island 

Ullrich, Henry Franz Maryland 

Vann, Homer King Florida 

Vestal, Tom Fletcher North Carolina 

Volenick, Lee Joseph New York 

Wallack, Charles Albert, B.S. ..New Jersey 

Ward, Hugh Walter, A.B Maryland 

Waters, Zack James, B.S . . . North Carolina 
Yeager, George Herschel, B.S. .. .Maryland 
Yudkoff, William, B.S New Jersey 



84 



MATRICULATES— 1927-28 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 



Aronofsky, Milton Robert, Ph.B., 

Connecticut 

Ashman, Harry, B.S Maryland 

Baumgardner, George M., A.B. . .Maryland 

Baylus, Meyer Milby, Ph.G Maryland 

Belinkin, William, B.S New York 

Benfer, Kenneth Louis, A.B Maryland 

Benson, Alvan Homer Maryland 

Berkowitz, Rudolph, A.B New York 

Blum, Joseph Sydney, Ph.G Maryland 

Borow, Henry North Dakota 

Burns, John Howard, A.B Maryland 

*Cannon, David Clayton, Jr., B.S,, 

Pennsylvania 

Chenitz, William, B.S New Jersey 

Cohen, Archie Robert, Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Irvin Joseph, Ph.G Maryland 

Cohen, Max Hurston, Ph.G Maryland 

Coppola, Matthew Joseph, B.S... New Yoork 

Durrett, Clay Earle, B.S Maryland 

Dyar, Edna Gerrish, Ph.D., 

District of Columbia 

Edmonds, Henry Jeter Virginia 

Farinacci, Charles Joseph, A.B Ohio 

Faw, Wylie Melvin, Jr Maryland 

Feman, Jacob George, A.B New York 

Fiocco, Vincent James, B.S New York 

Fisher, Samuel New Jersey 

Flescher, Julius, Ph.G Maryland 

Garey, James Ljmaan, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Garfinkel, Abraham, B.S New York 

Gerner, Harry Ezekiel, B.S....New Jersey 

Gersten, Paul Francis New York 

Ginsberg, Leon, Ph.D New York 

Goldman, Lester Milton, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Goldstein, Jacob Everett, B.S New York 

Goodman, Julius Henry, Ph.G. .. .Maryland 
Hildenbrand, Emil John C, B. S.Maryland 
Hornbaker, John Harlan, A.B. .. .Maryland 

Hudson, RoUin Carl, A.B Maryland 

Johnson, Marius Pitkin, A.B. . .Connecticut 



Kilgus, John Frank, Jr Pennsylvania 

Kirschner, Abe Edward, A.B....New York 
Kleinman, Abraham Morris, B.S. New York 
Kovarsky, Albert Elias, A.B... New Jersey 
Kraemer, Samuel Harry, B.S..New Jersey 

Kremen, Abraham, A.B Maryland 

Kuhn, Esther Frances, A.B Maryland 

Levin, Morton Loeb, Ph.G Maryland 

Levy, Solomon, A.B Palestine 

Lewandoski, Henry Charles Maryland 

Lewis, Frank Russell Maryland 

Magovern, Thomas F New Jersey 

Mansdorf er, George Bowers, B.S . . Maryland 
Miller, Benjamin Herman, A.B. . .Maryland 

Miller, Isaac New Jersey 

Miller, James Alton, A.B Maryland 

Montilla, Victor Jose Porto Rico 

Mortimer, Egbert Laird, Jr., A.B.Maryland 

Needle, Nathan E Maryland 

Oppenheim, Joseph Harry New York 

Perlman, Robert, B.S New York 

*Post, Charles Gordon, Jr., A.B. New York 

Powell, Joseph Lawrence Pennsylvania 

Reid, Francis Fielding, A.B Maryland 

Rineberg, Irving Edward, B.S. New Jersey 

Romano, Nicholas Michael Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Abner Herman, B.S..New York 

Rozum, John Charles New York 

Shill, Benjamin, A.B New Jersey 

Shulman, Louis Robert Maryland 

Smith, Joseph Jacob, A.B Connecticut 

Snoops, George John, Jr., A.B. . .Maryland 

Snyder, Nathan, Ph.G Maryland 

Soltroff, Jack Gerson, B.S. .. .Pennsylvania 
Sperling, Nathaniel Mortimer, B.S., 

New York 

Straka, Robert Paul, M.S Maryland 

Weinstein, Jack, B.S New York 

Werner, Aaron Seth New York 

Woolley, Alice Stone, B.S New York 

Young, Ralph Funk Maryland 

Zeiger, Samuel, B.S New York 



*Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES— 1927-28 



85 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 



Adalman, Philip, Ph,G Maryland 

Adams, Pius Edward Maryland 

Allen, Howard Stanley Pennsylvania 

Andrew, David Holmes, A.B Maryland 

Baldwin, Kenneth Malison Maryland 

Bamberger, Beatrice, A.B Maryland 

Barr, William Carlisle, Jr., 

District of Columbia 

Baumgartner, Eugene Irving Maryland 

Berman, Henry Irving Maryland 

Bernstein, Joseph, Ph.G Maryland 

♦Bradley, John Edmund Maryland 

Brayshaw, Thomas H Maryland 

Brice, Arthur Talbott Maryland 

Brill, Bernard New York 

Brill, John Leonard, A.B Pennsylvania 

Clouse, Paul Ronald Pennsylvania 

Contract, Eli, A.B Maryland 

Cudlipp, Irene Mills, B.S Maryland 

Davis, Melvin Booth Maryland 

Dawson, William Maddren, B.S..New York 
Donohue, Bernard Walker, A.B. . .Maryland 

Drenga, Joseph Francis, A.B Maryland 

Eckstein, Harry, B.S New York 

Edel, John Wesley, B.S Maryland 

*Edgerton, Glenn S North Carolina 

Empie, John Carl, B.S Maryland 

Ernest, Roy Cooper, A.B Ohio 

Fahey, Edward Vincent, A. B.. Pennsylvania 

Feldman, Samuel, A.M Maryland 

Feuer, Arthur, B.S New York 

Fitch, Wilmer Price New York 

Foster, Ruth Maryland 

Fox, George DeGruchy, A.B Maryland 

Friedman, Joseph, B.S New York 

♦Fuhrman, William Nelson Maryland 

*Funk, Zanerian Evangeline, B. S.Maryland 
Ginewsky, Solomon Irving, A.B., 

Connecticut 

Glantz, Albert LeRoy, A.B Maryland 

Grossman, Isadore, A.B Maryland 

Grove, Donald Birtner Maryland 

Gundry, Rachel Krebs, A.B Maryland 

Halper, Arthur Matthews, B.S. .New York 
Haskell, Marian Louise, Ph.G. .. .Maryland 

Headley, Albert Emerson, A.B Ohio 

Helfrich, Raymond Frederick, A.B.Maryland 

Hoffman, Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Hollander, Mark Buckner, A.B. . .Maryland 
Hombrook, Kent Mai dlow. . .West Virginia 

Jacobs, Herman New York 

Jacobson, Samuel Maurice, Ph.G. .Maryland 

Jaklitsch, Frank Henry, B.S New York 

Jensen, Oarl Dana F Washington 

♦Jeppi, Joseph Vincent, A.B Maryland 

Jett, Page C, A.B Maryland 

Jones, Arthur Ford Maryland 



Justice, James Thomas, Jr., A.B., 

North Carolina 

Kahn, Herbert Adrian Maryland 

Karger, Abraham, B.S New York 

Kaufman, Max, Ph.G New York 

Keefe, Walter Joseph, A.B Connecticut 

Kermisch, Albert, Ph.G Maryland 

Klimes, Louis Frank Maryland 

Kohn, Walter Maryland 

Krieger, Jerome Leon, A.B Maryland 

♦Kulacki, Leo Lucas, A.B Maryland 

Lachman, Harry, B.S Maryland 

Lang, Abraham, B.S New York 

Langeluttig, Harry Vernon, A. B.. Maryland 

Lerner, Philip Frank, A.B Maryland 

Leshine, Sidney Starr, B.S Connecticut 

Levine, David Robert, B.S New York 

Lieberman, Samuel, M.S New York 

Lubin, Paul Maryland 

Mankovich, Desiderius George. Pennsylvania 

Martin, Thomas Adrian, Ph.G Maiylaiiu 

Marx, Ernest Burleigh Maryland 

Masterson, John Francis New Jersey 

*Mayolo, Larry Pete West Virginia 

McAllister, Benjamin, Jr., Ph.G. .Maryland 

*McGlynn, Patrick John Pennsylvania 

McHale, George Francis, A.B.Pennsylvania 

Meyer, Leo Martin, A.M New York 

*Miller, Henry Frank Maryland 

Moore, William Patterson, B.S Ohio 

Moyers, Waldo Briggs, A.B..West Virginia 
Murphy, Richard Lawrence, A.B., 

New Hampshire 

Myers, George Thomas, A.B Maryland 

Newnam, Alpheus Carlton, Jr. .. .Maryland 

Nocera, Francisco Pablo Porto Rico 

Palitz, Leo Solomon, A.M New York 

*Perdew, Paul Raymond, B.S. .. .Maryland 
*Peters, William Howard, A.M.Pennsylvania 

Pfaff, Joseph John Maryland 

Puirinton, William Andrew Maine 

Rehmeyer, Walter Owen, B.S.Pennsylvania 

Rodriguez, Manuel Porto Rico 

Rohm, Jack Zeth Pennsylvania 

Rohm, Robert Franklin Pennsylvania 

Rosenberg, Benjamin, B.S New York 

*Ryan, John Paul, A.B Maryland 

Seabold, William Mervin Maryland 

Schimunek, Emmanuel Aloysius, A.B., 

Maryland 
*Sechrist, Gurrien Preston .... Pennsylvania 
Seidman, Herman Harold, B.S. . .New York 
Shanahan, Daniel Stephen, A.B. .Maryland 

Shelley, Harry Sandberg, B.S Maryland 

*Shenberger, Donald Clair. .. .Pennsylvania 

Shochat, Albert Joshua, B.S New York 

Siwinski, Arthur George, A.B. .. .Maryland 



MATRICULATES— 1927-28 



FIRST YEAR CLASS— Continued 



Sklar, Isidore Allen, Ph.G Maryland 

Slate, Marvin Longworth, A.B,, 

North Carolina 

Smith, Solomon, A.B Maryland 

Sowers, Lowell Martin, B.S Maryland 

Spence, Thomas Turnbull, Jr., B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Sprecher, Milford Harsh, B.S. .. .Maryland 
Stephens, Herbert Roosevelt, A.B.Maryland 

Sterling, Susanne Maryland 

Stevens, Russell Alvin, A.B. . .Pennsylvania 

*Did not complete the year. 



*Svitak, Adolph James, A.B Maryland 

Taylor, Robert B Pennsylvania 

*Todd, Howard Davis, A.B Maryland 

Van Ormer, William Alfred. .Pennsylvania 

Warren, Edward William New York 

Wigderson, Henry, B.S New York 

Wirts, Carl Alexander Pennsylvania 

Wojcik, William Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Woodward, Lewis K., Jr., A.B. . .Maryland 
Zupnik, Howard Lester Pennsylvania 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SESSION OF 1927-1928 



College of Agriculture 124 

College of Arts and Sciences 558 

Regular 549 

Extension 9 

School of Dentistry 369 

College of Education 322 

Regular 139 

Extension 183 

College of Engineering 409 

Regular 233 

Extension 176 

Graduate School 96 

College of Home Economics 53 

School of Law 296 

School of Medicine 391 

School of Nursing 113 

School of Pharmacy 358 

Summer School, 1927, College Park 572 

Total 3,661 

Duplications 76 

Net Total 3,585 



GRADUATES 1928 



87 



GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, JUNE 2, 1928 



Baer, Adolph New York 

Bailey, Hugh Alvin, A.B South Carolina 

Bedri, Marcel Rechtman Palestine 

Berger, William Adolph, B.S . . . New Jersey 

Blecher, Irving Ezra New York 

Bonelli, Nicholas W'lUam, A.B. New Jersey 

Brager, Simon Maryland 

Chor, Herman, A.B Maryland 

Clemson, Earle Princeton Maryland 

Duckwall, Frederick Mooman. West Virginia 
Duncan, George Andrew, B.S. West Virginia 

Friedman, Bernard New York 

Garred, Herbert William D., B.S., 

West Virginia 

Gilbert, Jacques Saul Rhode Island 

George, Jessie Ethelwyn, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Goldberg, Victor, Ph.G Maryland 

Goodman, Jerome Edward, Ph. G.Maryland 

Greer, Creed Collins, B.S West Virginia 

GroUman, Aaron Isaac, A.B Maryland 

Giilck, Georg Krohn, B.S Denmark 

Gundry, Lewis Perkins, A.B Maryland 

Hankin, Samuel Jay Maryland 

Hayes, Paul Maryland 

Herold, Lewis Jacob, Ph.G New York 

Johnson, Walter Brenaman, A.B. .Maryland 

Jones, Henry Alvan, Ph.G Maryland 

Kaye, Philip Louis New York 

Kohn, Theodore, B.S South Carolina 

Kotch, Nathan Hersh New York 

Lampert, Hyman New York 

Lamstein, Jacob Irwin, B.S New York 

Laukaitis, Joseph George Maryland 

Lerner, Morris New York 

Levinsky, Maurice Connecticut 

Levinson, Louis Jack New York 

Limbach, Earl Frederick, A.B Ohio 

Litsinger, Edward Andrew, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Little, Luther Emanuel, Ph.G Maryland 

Littman, Irving Isaac Maryland 

Lyon, Isadore Bernard, A.B Maryland 

Mace, John, Jr., B.S Maryland 



Maddi, Vincent Michael, A.B. . . .New York 

Maged, Alan John, A.B New York 

McCeney, Robert Sadler, A.B Maryland 

McFaul, William Neal, Jr., A.B. .Maryland 
McGee, William Buster, B.S. .West Virginia 
Mee, Robert Amos, A.B., B.S., 

New Hampshire 

Meister, Aaron New York 

Merksamer, David, A.B New York 

Merlino, Frank Anthony New Jersey 

Messina, Vincent Michael Maryland 

Mostwill, Ralph New Jersey 

Piacentine, Pasquale Anthony. . .New York 

Pileggi, Peter New Jersey 

Rascoff, Henry Morris New York 

Rich. Benjamin Sunderland, A.B.Maryland 

Roetling, Carl Paul Maryland 

Rosen, Marks Julius New York 

Rubinstein, Hyman Solomon, Ph.G.Maryland 

Rutter, Joseph Howard Florida 

Saffron, Morris Harold, A.B... New Jersey 

Sardo, Samuel Robert, B.S Pennsylvania 

Shaw, Cecil Curry, A.B Alabama 

Silver, Abraham Alfred Connecticut 

Singer, Jack Jerome Maryland 

Smoot, Aubrey Cannon, A.B Maryland 

Smoot, Merrill Clayvelle, B.S Maryland 

Stacy, Theodore Edwin, Jr., Ph.G.Maryland 
Temple, Levi Wade, Jr., B.S., 

South Carolina 

Tenner, David, Ph.G Maryland 

Varney, William Henry Maryland 

Vernaglia, Anthony Paul New York 

Warner, Carroll Gardner, A.B. . . .Maryland 
Weintraub, Fred Siegfried, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Weisenfeld, Nathan, B.S Connecticut 

Wells, Samuel Robert, B.S... West Virginia 

Wolf, Frederick Samuel Maryland 

Wurzel, Milton New Jersey 

Yarbrough, Oscar DeMelle Alaban^ 

Zimmerman, Frederick Thomas, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 



Honors 

University Prize — Gold Medal — David Tenneb 

Certificates of Honor 
Adolph Baer Jacob Irving Lamstein 

Ralph Mostwill Aaron Isaac Grollman 

Bernard Friedman 
The Dr. Jose L. Hirsch Memorial Prize of $50.00 for the best work in 
Pathology during the second and third years was awarded to David Tenner. 
The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship for the highest standing in 
the Freshman Class was awarded to Samuel Feldman. 



88 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

President 
Dr. C. Reid Edwards, Medical Arts Building, Baltimore, U. of M. 1913 

Vice-Presidents 

Dr. C. Emil Brack, 500 E. 20th Street, Baltimore, P. & S. 1895. 

Dr. J. C. Lumpkin, 818 Park Avenue, Baltimore, B. M. C. 1898. 

Dr. Fred W. Schlutz, 121 Millard Hall, University of Minnesota 

Medical School, Minneapolis, Minn., U. of M. 1902. 

Secretary 
Dr. Howard M. Bubert, Tudor Hall Apartments, Baltimore, U. of M. 1920. 

Assistant Secretary 
Dr. Nathan Wjnslow, 1900 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore, U. of M. 1901. 

Executive Committee 
Dr. Frank W. Keating, Chairman, Owings Mills, Maryland, U. of M. 1896. 
Dr. E. P. Smith, 920 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, P. & S. 1912. 
Dr. J. W. Holland, University Hospital, Baltimore, U. of M. 1896. 
Dr. Austin Wood, 817 Park Avenue, Baltimore, U. of M. 1914. 
Dr. I. S. ZiNBEEG, 2302 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, U. of M. 1920. 

Advisory Committee 
Dr. C. C. Habliston, Chairman, Latrobe Apartments, Baltimore, U. of M. 1914. 
Dr. Frank W. Kirby, 110 E. North Avenue, Baltimore, U. of M. 1892. 
Dr. W. H. Triplett, 1324 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, B. M. C. 1911. 
Dr. A. F. Ries, 24 S. Broadway, Baltimore, P. & S. 1903. 
Dr. John Evans, Medical Arts Building, Baltimore, B. M. C. 1903. 

Hospital Council 
Dr. G. M. LiNTHicuM, 817 Park Avenue, Baltimore, P. & S. 1893. 
Dr. Charles W. Maxson, 827 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, P. & S. 1910. 

Alumni Council 
Dr. Charles Bagley, Latrobe Apartments, Baltimore, U. of M. 1904. 

Necrologist 
Dr. William S. Love, 836 W. North Avenue, Baltimore, U. of M. 1890. 

Editors 
Dr. BuBEET, University of Maryland. 
Dr. Emil Novak, 26 E. Preston Street, Baltimore, B. M. C. 1904. 

Treasurer 
M. LeRoy Lumpkin, 914 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, U. of M. 1919. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 89 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund : 

Harry Adler, M.D. John B. Thomas, Ph.G. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 

Stuart Janney Robertson Griswold 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incori)orated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland/' and is independent and self-perpetuating. 
Its powers are limited to the eocpenditure of the interest derived from 
the fund, which is to be applied in the discretion of the Board for 
the benefit of the University. Contributions, donations and bequests 
are solicited from Alumni and friends. They may be made to the 
general or University Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other 
department of the University. If intended for the School of Medi- 
cine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some 
special object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, 
publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., 
in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. 
Attention is invited to the "Charles Frick Eesearch Fund," already 
established in memory of that distinguished investigator. Checks 
should be made payable to J. M. H. Kowland, Treasurer, Lombard 
and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 
To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Mary- 
land, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, 

for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

To Ejidowment Fund 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of 
the University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of 

the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 



90 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of N'ursing 
Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Frances M. Branley, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 
Isabel Zimmerman, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Helen Wright, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 
Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 
Grace Pearson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Bertha Hoffman, R.N. 

Alice Bennett, R.N Night Supervisor 

Jane Moffatt, R.N Supervisor — Dispensary 

Reba Davis, R.N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward 

Estella Baldwin, R.N Head Nurse — Children's Ward 

Helen J. Morgart, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Medical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Rebecca Hall, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Rhae Gerber, R.N Head Nurse — Women's Medical, 

Surgical and Gynecological Ward 

Lucy Brude, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Fannie Mae Mundy, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Frankie Mulligan, R.N Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Cora Mason Wilson>, R.N Head Nurse — Surgical Supply Room 

Frances Leishear, R.N Head Nurse — Accident Room 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 91 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy 
C. L. Davis, M.D. 

Physiology 
F. A. RiES, M.D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Chemistry 
Ruth F. Cark, B.S. 

Materia Medica 
W. H. ScHULTz, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Medicine 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. J. S. Hogan, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. V. L. Ellicott, M.D. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D. 

Pediatrics 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Psychiatry 
R. McCluby Chapman, M.D. 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 
Harby M. Robinson, M.D. 

Ophthalmology 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Otology 
J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Surgery 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology 
E. A. Looper, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 



92 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
R. Tun STALL Taylor, M.D. 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Social Service 
Special Lecturers 



STUDENTS ENROLLED, 1927-1928. 

Post-graduates 1 

Affiliates 7 

Seniors 22 

Intermediates 39 

Juniors and Preparatory 32 

Total 101 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in 
the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
Hospital, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morn- 
ing prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 
250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of 
instruction and practice in all phases of nursing, including experi- 
ence in the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its 
opportunity for varied experience and in its thorough curriculum 
taught by best qualified instructors and members of the Medical 
Staff of the University. 

Admission — Eequirements : In order to become a candidate for 
admission to the Training School, application must be made in 
person or by letter, to the Superintendent of Nurses. An applica- 
tion by letter should be accompanied by a statement from a clergy- 
man testifying to good moral character and from a physician cer- 
tifying to sound health and unimpaired faculties. No person will 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 93 

be considered who is not in a good physical condition between the 
ages of 18 and 35. She must also show that she has a High School 
education or its equivalent. This is the minimum requirement, as 
women of superior education and culture are given preference pro- 
vided they meet the requirements in other particulars. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of 
dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation, is 
left to the decision of the Superintendent of Nurses. Misconduct, 
disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neglect of duty are 
causes for dismissal at any time by the Superintendent of Nurses, 
with the approval of the President of the University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February and September. 

Hours on Duty : During the probation term the students are on 
duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, Intermediate 
and Senior years the students are on eight-hour day duty, with six 
hours on Sunday and Holidays, and ten-hour night duty. The night 
duty periods are approximately five or six months during the three 
years. 

Sickness : A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill, 
all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through ill- 
ness in excess of two weeks during the three years must be made up. 
Should the authorities of the school decide that through the time 
lost the theoretical work has not been sufficiently covered to permit 
the student to continue in that year, it will be necessary for her to 
continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations: Vacations are given between June and September. 
A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the completion of 
the first year and four weeks at the completion of the second year. 

Expense: A student receives her board, lodging, and a reason- 
able amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her period 
of probation she provides her own uniforms made in accordance with 
the hospital regulations. After being accepted as a student nurse, 
she wears the uniform furnished by the hospital. The student is 
also provided with textbooks, and in addition to this is paid five 
dollars (|5.00) a month. Her personal expenses during the course 
of instruction and training will depend entirely upon her individual 
habits and tastes. 



94 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

JUNIOR YEAR 
First Term 

The Junior Year is divided into two periods. The first term is the 
preparatory period (4 months) and the second the junior term. 

In the preparatory term the student is given practical instruc- 
tion in: 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies. The cost of 
hospital materials, apparatus and surgical instruments. 
II. Household economics and the preparation of foods. 

III. The hospital out-patients' department and dispensary. 

During this term the practical work is done under constant super- 
vision, and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen-rooms, 
laundry and store-room. 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruction 
divided into laboratory and lecture periods is thirty hours and in- 
cludes courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Dietetics, Materia 
Miedica, Personal Hygiene, Drugs and Solutions, Household Eco- 
nomics, Short Course in Ethics and History of Nursing. 

At the close of the first term of the Junior Y^ear the students are 
required to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral tests, and 
failure to do so will be sufficient reason to terminate the course at 
this point. 

SUBSEQUENT COURSE 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary period, 
occupies two and three-fourths years, and students are not accepted 
for a shorter period. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly engaged in 
practical work under the immediate supervision and direction of the 
head nurses and instructors. 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Second Term 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruction in 
Massage, Bacteriology, General Surgery and Introductory Medicine. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 95 

Practical instruction is received in the male and female, medical, 
surgical, and children's wards. 

INTERMEDIATE YEAR 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes Pediatrics, 
General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics, Gynecology and 
Orthopaedics. The practical work provides experience in the nursing 
of obstetrical and gynecological patients, in the operating-rooms and 
the out-patient department. 

SENIOR YEAR 

During this period the student receives short courses of lectures 
on subjects of special interest. This includes a consideration of the 
work of institutions of public and private charities, of settlements, 
and various branches of professional work in nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administrative work to those 
showing exceptional ability in the Senior Year. With these students 
conferences are held on administration and teaching problems. 

Examinations — Avhich are both written and oral — include prac- 
tical tests, and the standing of the student is based upon the general 
character of work throughout the years, as well as the results of the 
examinations. Students must pass all subjects before entering upon 
the work of the following year. 

Graduation : The diploma of the School will be awarded to those 
who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three years and 
have passed successfully the final examinations. 



Scholarships: One scholarship has been established by the 
Alumnae of the Training School. It entitles a nurse to a six weeks' 
course at Teachers' College, New York. This scholarship is awarded 
at the close of the third year to the student w^hose work has been of 
the highest excellence, and who desires to pursue post-graduate study 
and special work. There is a second prize of fifty dollars, known as 
the Elizabeth Collins Lee prize, which is awarded at the close of the 
third year to the student whose work has been of the second highest 
excellence. 



96 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 



An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary Board 
to the student who at the completion of three years shows excep- 
tional executive ability. 

A prize of fifty dollars, known as the ''Edwin and Leander M. 
Zimmerman Prize," is given in the senior class to the student whose 
practical nursing is of the highest excellency and whose interest and 
sympathy in the patients is greatest. 



GRADUATES, 1928 



MARGARET E. CURRENS 
HILDA LOUISE DUGGER 
EDITH ELIZABETH HALL 
MARTHA ALICE HASTINGS 
ANNE HOFFMAN 
GOLDIE IWILLA HOUGH 
IRENE ELIZABETH HAMRICK 
THELMA LEE HUDDLESTON 
MARY LYNDALE KELLY 
FRANCES MILDRED LEISHEAR 
MARTHA AGNES MAGRUDER 



MILDRED MAY MARGUS 
MARIE CLARKSON PEARCE 
ELIZABETH S. PENNEWELL 
ELIZABETH AUGUSTA PRIESTER 
MARGARET MARY RIFFLE 
KATHERINE LANDWEHR ROTH 
VADA BRUNETTA SMITH 
EMILY ROSE SLACUM 
GRACE BELL WAGNER 
EMMA ARLINE WINSHIP 
ELIZABETH WORK 



MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 
and incorporated in 1901. It has developed the art of the profession 
according to the high standard requisite to qualify for Registered 
Nurse. 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was organized and incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 1899, and has 
operated successfully for a quarter of a century. 

Requirements for Admission. 

A candidate desiring to enter the School of Nursing should apply 
to the Superintendent of Nurses by letter or in person at least six 
weeks before the entrance date. It is preferred that she apply in 
person, accompanied by her mother or guardian. If a personal inter- 
view is not possible, a written application may be submitted. 



Age. 

Candidates should preferably be between the ages of eighteen and 
thirty -five years. Exceptions to this rule are sometimes made at the 
discretion of the Superintendent of Nurses. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 97 

Physique. 

Applicants should be of average height and good physique. Teeth 
and eyes should be attended to before entering the School, and 
tonsils removed if not in good condition. Every applicant is required 
to send in a certificate of a physical examination by her family 
physician. A physical examination is also made by the school 
physician during the preliminary period. 

Education. 

Applicants for admission should present at least high school cer- 
tificate of graduation or its equivalent in educational values. The 
credits of preliminary education are fully accounted and the nurse 
who is the better qualified finds such a foundation more to her advan- 
tage as she progresses through the years of study. 

Calendar. 

Students are admitted September 1st and January 15th. 

Length of Course. 

The course of instruction covers three years. It is divided into a 
preliminary term of four months, a freshman term of eight months, 
a junior term of one year, and a senior term of one year. 

Conditions of Acceptance. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness for the 
work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing a student at the 
end of the term of probation or during its course. She may also, 
with the approval of the faculty, terminate the connection of a stu- 
dent with the School in any justifiable instance. At the end of the 
preliminary period, if the student's health, general education, and 
natural aptitude prove satisfactory to the Director of the School 
and the Sister Superior, she shall be appointed for enrollment as a 
student nurse. 

Expenses. 

An admission fee of fifty dollars is required from all students. 
This covers the cost of uniforms and books required during the pre- 
liminary course. 



98 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Should the student for any reason leave the school before com- 
pleting the course, this fee will not be returned, nor may she take 
with her any part of the equipment. 

After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School of Kursing 
proper. They receive ten dollars per month to help defray incidental 
expenses. No compensation is given, the education received being 
considered sufficient return for service rendered. Board, laundry, 
etc., are furnished by the institution. 

Four weeks before admission candidates should forward the fifty- 
dollar entrance fee, and measurements for uniforms and aprons, 
which will be in readiness upon their arrival. No orders will be 
considered until this fee is received. 

Uniform Equipment. 

After acceptance students are required to wear the uniform of the 
School. They are not permitted to appear on the street away from 
the hospital in uniform at any time. 

A list of the necessary articles of clothing and other equipment 
will be sent to each accepted candidate for admission. 

Hours of Duty, 

During the preparatory period of four months, the students are 
on duty in the Wards not more than four hours daily. 

During the freshman, junior, and senior j^ears, the number of 
hours of duty does not exceed eight hours during the day and ten 
hours during the night. One-half day off duty is given each week. 
Students on night duty are given one night off each week and two 
days at the end of each night duty period. 

Yacations. 

Vacations are given between May 15th and October 1st, and at no 
other time. Students are granted four weeks' vacation at the end 
of the first and second years. Absence other than this, is not allowed, 
except in extreme cases. Students are not allowed during their 
course of instruction to return to their homes to care for sick rela- 
tives or friends, or absent themselves for other personal reasons. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 99 

illness. 

Students who are ill are cared for at the expense of the Hospital 
for a reasonable length of time. Members of the Medical Staff of 
the Hospital give professional service gratuitously to students of the 
School of Nursing. Time lost from illness or for other reasons must 
be made up. Absences are allowed for emergencies only. If absence 
is prolonged, students may lose their class position. 

Examinations. 

Examinations, both written and oral, are held at the end of the 
course of instruction in each subject. These examinations include 
practical tests. The standing of the pupil is based upon the general 
character of her work throughout the year, as well as upon the 
results of her examinations. Pupils are required to pass in all sub- 
jects of a given year before entering upon the work of the following 
year. Careful and complete records of class work, of examinations, 
and of the general deportment of all pupils are kept on file in the 
School office. 

Graduation. 

The diploma of the School will be awarded to those who have 
completed satisfactorily the full term of three years and have passed 
successfully the final examinations. 



THE FIVE YEAR COURSE 

Leading to B.S. Degree and Diploma of Graduate Xurse 

The University of Maryland, in affiliation with the Mercy Hospital 
School of Nursing, offers a combined Academic and Nursing 
program. 

The completion of this course entitles the student to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland, and to the 
diploma of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. 

Graduate nurses who hold college degrees are greatly in demand, 
especially for positions in administration and teaching. This pro- 
gram consequently offers a distinct advantage. 



100 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 



Outline of Course. 

Two years of this course (pre-nursing or post-nursing period) 
consisting of 70 semester hours are spent in the College of Arts and 
Sciences of the University, with the usual College vacations. At 
least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence at 
College Park in order that the student may have her share in the 
social and cultural activities of College life. 

Requirements for Admission. 

Students electing such a course must before entering the School 
of Nursing, satisfy the entrance requirements of the University of 
M'aryland. Applicants must be personally adapted to professional 
nursing. 

Fees and Other Expenses. 

During the two years which the students spend at College Park 
they maintain themselves, and pay their own College fees. (See 
University of Maryland bulletin.) 

Throughout the Nursing School Course the hospital provides 
without expense to the student maintenance and care during tem- 
porary illness. 

GRADUATES, 1923 



Albaugh, Susan Elizabeth Maryland 

Billingslea, Agnes L Maryland 

Billmeyer, Julia Ithiel Maryland 

Carey, Mary Evelyn West Virginia 

Carmody, Eileen Grace Maryland 

Coolahan, Mary Loretta Maryland 

Edelen, Frances Forbes Maryland 

Guy, Thyra Catherine Maryland 

Hampson, Marjorie Lillian Maryland 

Humelsine, Mary T Maryland 

Hunt, Mary Maude Maryland 

Judge, Genevieve Teresa Maryland 

Kane, Ethel Margaret Maryland 

Louderman, Carmelita Estelle..New Jersey 
Matthews, Catherine Eugenia. . . .Maryland 
McWilliams, Ruth 'Corinne Maryland 



Quill, Grace V Maryland 

Rose, Elizabeth Virginia 

Seigman, Anna Virginia Pennsylvania 

Sheetz, Anna Geraldine Pennsylvania 

Shetla, Mary Dorothy Maryland 

Shipley, Mary Marcella Maryland 

Hitchcock, Sister Mary Euphrasia.Maryland 

Daily, Sister Mary Veronica Maryland 

Smith, Cosma Valeria Pennsylvania 

Sullivan, Ida Lavinia Georgia 

Sullivan, Rita Mary Glengarriff, Ireland 

Toston, Elaine Maryland 

Van de Grift, Edythe B Maryland 

Ways, Mary Virginia Maryland 

Wooddell, Martha Stark West Virginia 

Young, Margaret Magdeline.. .Pennsylvania 



Vol. XIV JULY, 1929 No. 1 

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL of MEDICINE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




PART TWO 
CATALOGUE SUPPLEMENT 

SESSION 1929-30 

PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR 

JANUARY, APRIL, JULY AND OCTOBER 

LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 

Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Postoffice at 
Baltimore, Maryland, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



INDEX 



Page 

Alumni Association 91 

Annual Hospital Appointments 80 

Board of Instruction 8 

Board of Regents 6 

Calendar 4 

Combined Course in Arts and Medi- 
cine 74 

Consolidation of Schools. 14 

Curriculum, Organization of 39 

Anatomy 40 

Histology 41 

P^mbryology 41 

Xeuro Anatomy 41 

Physiology 42 

Bacteriology and Immunology... 42 

Biological Chemistry 43 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 43 

Pathology 44 

Medicine 46 

Clinical Pathology 49 

Gastro-Enterology 50 

Psychiatry 50 

Pediatrics 51 

Neurology 52 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 52 

Medical Jurisprudence 53 

Surgery 54 

Anaesthesia 57 

Dermatology 57 

Orthopaedic Surgery 57 

Roentgenology 58 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy. 59 

Throat and Nose 59 

Genito-Urinary 59 

Colon and Rectum 60 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy 61 

Obstetrics 62 

Otology 61 

Gynecology 62 

Ophthalmology 63 

History of Medicine &i 



Page 
Dispensary Reports : 

Mercy Hospital 32 

University Hospital 24 

Clinical Faculties : 

Mercy Hospital 25 

University Hospital 17 

Dispensary Staffs : 

Mercy Hospital 30 

University Hospital 21 

Endowment Fund 92 

Expenses, Students' 81 

Pees 75 

Graduates 89 

General Summary of Students 88 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 34 

Mercy Hospital 25 

Baltimore City Hospitals 32 

University Hospital 17 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 37 

Libraries 38 

Nfatriculates 82 

Medical Council 7 

Prizes 76 

Prizemen 90 

Requirements for Matriculation 71 

Rules 74 

Schedule 65 

Scholarships 76 

Staffs : 

Baltimore City Hospital 33 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 34 

Mercy Hospital 26 

University Hospital 19 

Training Schools for Nurses : 

Mercy Hospital 99 

University Hospital 93 

University Council 6 

University of Maryland, Organiza- 
tion of 5 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of Mary- 
land, Baltimore Medical College Newsi, and the Journal of 
the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 



VOL. XIV JULY, 1929 No. 1 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1929-30 



CALENDAR OF BALTIMORE SCHOOLS 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Session 1929-1930 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1929 

Monday, September 23 — Registration begins. 

Monday, September 30 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Monday, October 7 — Last day to register without paying fine of $5.00. 

Wednesday, November 27 — Thanksgiving. 

Saturday, December 21 — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled 
period. 

1930 

Monday, January 6 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
Saturday, January 25 — First semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Monday, January 13 — Registration begins for second semester. 
Monday, January 27 — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 
Saturday, February 3 — Last day to register without paying fine of $5.00, 
Saturday, February 22 — Holiday (Washington's Birthday). 
Thursday, April 17 — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 
Tuesday, April 22 — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
Saturday, June 7 — Commencement Day. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of 
nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for terms of nine years each. The general administration 
of the University is vested in the President. The University Coun- 
cil is an advisory body, composed of the President, the Assistant to 
the President, the Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. The Univer- 
sity Council acts upon all matters having relation to the University 
as a whole, or to cooperative work between the constituent groups. 
Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean 
and members of its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the in- 
ternal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are 
located in Baltimore ; the others in College Park, Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemakeb, Esq., Chairman Term expires 1933 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer Term expires 1932 

Db. Feank J. GooDNOW Term expires 1931 

John E. Raine, Esq Term expires 1930 

C. C. Gelder, Esq Term expires 1929 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary Term expires 1927 

Henry Holzapel, Jr., Esq Term expires 1934 

E. Brooke Lee, Esq Term expires 1935 

George M. Shriveb Term expires 1935 



Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President and Executive Officer 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President 

H. C. Byrd, B.S Assistant to the President 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Director of the Experiment Station 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng Dean of the College of Engineering 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D. .Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Phar.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. O. Heathwole, M.D., D.D.S Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. S. Small, Ph.D Dean of the College of Education 

M. Marie Mount, M.A Dean of the College of Home Economics 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., ScD. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B.. M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

EDUARD UHLENHUTH, Ph.D. 

CLYDE A. CLAPP, M.D. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

HiBAM Woods, A.M., M.D., LL.D Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Chas. O'Donovan, A.m., M.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine and Pediatrics 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D Psychiatry 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Clinical Medicine 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sangeir, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Haery Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Ophthalmology 

PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Akthue M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

GoRiX)N Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

AViLLiAM Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Eiiterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathologj'. 

H. Boyd Wylte, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Cabl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Fbank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
Colon. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

IR\^NG J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM., (Edinburgh), Professor of Hygiene and Public 
Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.IM., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 9 

5. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Charles E. Brack, Ph.G.. M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
3ARVEY G. Beck, M.D.. Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
^BERTUS Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 

Roentgenology. 
I^XDREW C. Gellis, A.m., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of 

Medicine. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
C. LoRiNG JosLiN, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Melvin Rosenthal, ^I.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
Robert W. Johnson, Jr., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Compton Riely, M.D.. Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and 

Nose. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Elliott Hltchins, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
W. F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
R. W. Locher. M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Abraham Saml^els, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M. D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Paul W. Clough, B.S.. M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

W. H. TouLsoN, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary 

Surgery. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Harry M. Steix, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
H. S. Sullivan, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
F. A. RiES, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
A. J. GiLLis, M.D., Asssociate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
C. C. Habltston, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
MiLFORD Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
John Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
O. G. Harne, A.B., Associate in Physiology. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Joseph I. KEitLER, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
R. G. WiLLSE, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
E. p. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Franklin B. Anderson, M.D.. Associate in Diseases of Throat and Nose. 
W. H. Daniels, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Harris Goldman, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
C. A. Reifschneideb, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 11 

M. J. Hanna, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

A. H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Albert E, Goldstein, M.D.. Associate in Pathology. 

H. M. BuBERT, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 

Zachasiah Morgan, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

H. M. Foster, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D.. Associate in Obstetrics. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Instructor in Pathology. 

W. S. Love, Jr., M.D.. Associate in Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 

A. A. SussMAN, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 

Samuel Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics, 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D.. Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

C. F. Horine, M.D.. Associate in Surgery. 

W. J. Todd, M.D.. Associate in Pediatrics. 

W. F. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Samuel Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Walter C. Merkle, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

John G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Monte Edwards, M.D.. Associate in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Raymond Lenhard, A.B., M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Lewis B. Hill. M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Clement R. Monroe, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

John F. Lutz. M.D.. Instructor in Histology. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D.. Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D.. Instructor in Dermatology. 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

William Michel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Isadore a. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

N. J. Davidov, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Koppleman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

M. G. Gichneb, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 



12 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

FfiEDEBiCK B. Daet, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

M. G. Tuix, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

ISADORE I. Levy, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. . 

William A. Strauss, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Moses Gellman, M.D,, Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

I. O. RiDGLEY, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. F. BoNGAEDT, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

R. M. Hening, M.D,, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

M. N. Putterman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

A. H. FiNKELSTEiN, M.D., lustructor in Pediatrics. 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Robert Hodes, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

M. H. Goodman, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

L. J. MiLLAN, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

K. B. Legge, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

W. A. Simpson, A.B,, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

John M. Haynes, B.A., M.A.. Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Ruth Musser, B.A., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

C. Gordon Warner, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. R. Geraghty, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Clyde N. Marvel. M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. H. Collinson, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Umiary Diseases. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

John A. O'Connor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

A. V. BucHNESs. M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmuller, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

William Emrich, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. H. Woody, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 

R. W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 



BOAKD OF INSTRUCTION 

C. V. HooPEE, Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

James W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Histology. '' 

J, HuxLA, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 

T. B. Aycock, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Anatomy. 

F. A. SiGBiST, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. HooPEB Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

L. T. Lavy, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Benjamin Milleb, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

E. V. Teagabden, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Ruth F. Caeb, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 
Geobge H. Rumbebg, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Maueice Shameb, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Frank H. Figqe, B.S., Assistant in Anatomy. 
T. J. TouHEY, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
S. H. Culvee, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Thomas C. Wolfe, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Heney C. Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Cabl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

F. S. Waesche, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
David Tennee, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

I. H. Masebitz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
AuBBEY C. Smoot, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
T. Tebby Bubgeb, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
W. T. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
M. Paul Byebly, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Heney Ginsbebg, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Walteb B. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
H. E. Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

G. A. Fbitz, M.D.. Assistant in Surgery. 

H. L. Wheeleb, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
W. W. Walkee, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institu- 
tions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore 
Medical College, the entire equipment of three large medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United 
States. It was chartered in 1807, under the name of the College 
of Medicine of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. 
In 1812 the College was empowered by the Legislature to annex 
three other colleges or faculties, of Divinity, of Law, and of Arts 
and Sciences, and the four colleges thus united were "constituted 
an University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medicine 
of the University of Maryland has always been a leading medical 
college, especially prominent in the South and widely known and 
highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medi- 
cal teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical libraries 
and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837), and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867), and 
of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for ade- 
quate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, 
and in this hospital intramural residency for the senior student 
was first established. 



ORGANIZATION lo 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medical 
College, an institution of 32 years' growth. By this association the 
facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, equip- 
ment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeon^ was incorporated under 
Legislative enactment in 1872, and established on Hanover Street 
in a building afterwards known as the Maternite, the first obstetri- 
cal hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was affected with the 
Washington University School of Medicine, in existence since 1827, 
and the college was removed to its present location at Calvert and 
Saratoga Streets. By this arrangement medical control of the City 
Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, and on this founda- 
tion in 1899 the present admirable college building was erected. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES 
The Laboratories 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of build- 
ings at Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South 
Paca Street. The schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory 
periods are placed with a view of obviating unnecessary move- 
ment on the part of the classes. The building known as Gray 
Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses three depart- 
ments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top floor, 
where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric lighting 
gives adequate illumination of the subjects. On this floor are the 
office of the department and the necessary preparation rooms. The 
Department of Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is 
a large room for the general student laboratory, which is thoroughly 
equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in addition 
contains many instruments of unique and original design. With 
office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is complete for 
student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray Laboratory is 
the Department of Physiology. In addition to the large student 
laboratory, which is constructed for sections of forty-five students, 



16 ORGANIZATION ! 

there are rooms for the departmental office, preparation of material, 
and storage of apparatus. An additional room is devoted exclu- 
sively to mammalian experiments. In this building there is main- 
tained an animal room where is kept an abundance of material for 
experimental purposes. The embalming and storage plant for the 
Department of Anatomy is in physical connection with the building 
and its special departments. The laboratories of physiology and 
pharmacology are completely equipped with apparatus lockers so 
that in accord with the best ideas of instruction, the students work 
in groups of two each, and each group has sufficient apparatus so 
that the experimental work can be carried on without delay or re- 
course to a general stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology and Biochemistry, are located in 
the laboratory building on Greene St. above Lombard. The former 
department has a large student laboratory with a capacity of ninety ; 
the tables are so placed as to secure the most satisfactory illumina- 
tion for microscopic work, in addition, all of the tables are electric- 
ally equipped for substage illumination. This equipment is also 
provided for all laboratories where microscopic work obtains. The 
museum of the Department of Patholog;>' adjoins the student labora- 
tory. Here are available for demonstration about fifteen hundred 
rarefully prepared and mounted specimens, and for laboratory in- 
struction and study, an abundance of autopsy material with com- 
plete clinical histories. Several preparation, research, and office 
rooms communicate with the other rooms of this department. The 
laboratory of Biochemistry is constructed and equipped for sections 
of fifty. The laboratory is completely equipped for the facilitation 
of work. The office and stockroom adjoin. In the Main Building is 
the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged for student reference, 
specimens which represent the careful selection of material over a 
period of many years. In the University Hospital is the Student 
Laboratory for the analytical studies by those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar laboratory is 
maintained in the building at the northwest corner of Saratoga and 
Calvert Streets, for the student work on the wards of the Mercy 
Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are two laboratories for Bacteri- 
ology, Histology, and Clinical Pathology. The two laboratories ac- 
commodate one hundred and twenty-five students or the full class, 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 17 

and are equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and appar- 
atus. Each of the departments housed in this building are provided 
with their individual offices, preparation and stockrooms. 



Clinical Facilities 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the University 
of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in the 
State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 1823, under the 
name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that time consisted of but 
four wards, one of which was reserved for eye cases. 

The present hospital has a capacity of 275 beds devoted to general 
medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical and surgical 
specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly modern X-ray depart- 
ment and clinical laboratory, and a post-mortem building which is 
constructed with special reference to the instruction of students in 
pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings so 
that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture halls and 
laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary and wards. 

Owing to its situation, being adjacent to the largest manufactur- 
ing district of the city and the shipping district, large numbers of 
accident cases are received. These combined with the cases of many 
sick seamen and with patients from our own city furnish a large 
amount of clinical material. Accommodations for thirty obstetrical 
patients are provided in the hospital for the purpose of furnishing 
actual obstetrical experience to each member of the graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor obstetrical 
clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful pre-natal super- 
vision, is attended during labor by a senior student, supervised by a 
hospital physician and assisted by a graduate nurse, and is visited 
during the puerperium by the attending student and graduate nurse. 
Careful pre-natal, labor and puerperal records are kept, making this 
work of extreme value to the medical student, not only from the 
obstetrical standpoint, but in making him appreciate the value of 
social service and public health work. 



18 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

During the year ending December 31, 1927, 264 cases were deliv- 
ered in the hospital and 1133 cases in the outdoor department. 
Students in the graduating class delivered an average of fourteen 
cases, each student being required to deliver twelve cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and the 
Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order that the 
teaching may be the same in each. Each dispensary has the follow- 
ing departments: Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Children, Eye and 
Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, 
Orthopaedics, Proctology, Dermatology, Throat and Nose, Tubercu- 
losis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departents of Medi- 
cine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special departments 
one hour each day. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 19 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 
Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean. 

M. C. PiNCOFFs, S.B., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 
A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 
Samuel M. Shoemaker, President of the Board of Regents. 
A. J. LoMAS, M.D., Superintendent of the Hospital. 
Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Supei-intendent of Nurses. 
J. Allison Muir. 
G. M. Shriver. 
W. B. Brooks. 
Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff 
J. W. Holland, M.D. C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni 
Charles W. Maxson, M.D. Frank W. Keating, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 
Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

Physicians 
Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D. Willl\m H. Smith, M.D. 

Oastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

^' ' Neurologist 

Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

\ Psychiatrist 

R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatrician 

C. LORING JOSLIN, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Pathologists 
Hugh R. Spencek, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Surgeo'ns 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. SHn>LEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

RoBT. W. Johnson, Jr.. A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Raymond Lenhard, A.B., M.D. 

Genito-Vrinary Surgeons 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 



Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologists 
MEL\^N S. Rosenthal, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Broncho scopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Anaesthetists 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D. Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S. 

W. G. Queen, M.D. 

Obstetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. NovEY, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Isador H. Siegel, A.B., M.D. Maurice Shamer, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

William Tarun, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Gy}i€Cologists 
W. S. Gardner, M.D. Hugh Brent. M.D 

R. G. Willse, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



21 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

RESIDENT STAFF, 1929-1950 

Resident in Surgery Clyde F. Karns, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery Hugh Alvin Bailey, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery Eael F. Limbach, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery Luther E. Little, M.D. 

Resident in Medicine Louis P. Gundry, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Medicine William H. Varney, M.D. 

Resident in Oynecology Clarence H. Peake, M.D. 

Resident in Obstetrics W. E. Hoffman, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Obstetrics Daniel Fisher, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Pediatrics Walter B. Johnson, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Roentgenology Luther E. Little, M.D. 



INTERNES 



Dr. W. Bateman Draper 
Dr. Leroy Savin Heck 
Dr. Samuel T. Helms 
Dr. Horton E. Hughes 
Dr. B. H. Kendall 
Dr. L. M. Overton 



Dr. M. C. Porterfield 
Dr. W. Glen Speicher 
Dr. Leon R. Staton 
Dr. H. F. Ullrich 
Dr. T. F. Vestal 
Dr. George Yelvger 



Medicine 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



William Michel, M.D. 
A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D. 
S. B. Wolfe, M.D. 



W. H. Triplett, M.D. 
Leo Lally, M.D. 
Thomas Coonan, M.D. 



Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 

J. H. Ullrich, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Joseph Sindler, M.D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. N. J. Davidov, M.D. 

Aubrey C. Smoot, M.D. C. Vance Hooper, M.D. 

'Neurology 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D. Robert Hodes, M.D. 



Mental Hygiene 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Director 
Stewart B. Snissen, M.D. 



22 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Diseases of the Lungs 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinio 

Diseases of Meta'bolism 
H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
WnxiAM S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergy Clinic 
H. M. BuBERT, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Pediatrics 

C. LoRiNG JosLiN, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 
John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. M. N. Putterman, M.D. 

WiLLL^M J. Todd, M.D. A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D. T. Terry Burger, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. M. Paul Byerly, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. Louis T. Lavy, M.D. 

Marie Kovner, M.D. S. C. Feldman, M.D. 

Clewell Howell, M.D. Henry Ginsberg, M.D. 

Samuel Glick, M.D. Walter B. Johnson, M.D. 

Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. M. Foster, M.D. W. R. Johnson, M.D. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D. S. H. Culver, M.D. 

F. A. Sigrist, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D. W. W. Walker, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. A. V. Buchness, M. D. 

E. S. Johnson, M.D. G. A. Fritz, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

Robert W. Johnson, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 
Raymond Lenhard, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D. L H. Maseritz, M.D. 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, M.D. Clement R. Monroe, M.D. 

W. A. Simpson, M.D. Moses Gellman, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 23 

Genito-Ui'inary 

W. H. TouLsoN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Harris Goldman, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

J. H. COLLINSON, M.D. H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

H. T. CoLLENBERQ, M.D. L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

LTLE J. MiLLAN, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. Luther E. Little, M.D. 

Dermatology 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
J. E. Gately, M.D. Francis Ellis, M.D. 

Nose and Throat 

E. A. Looper, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

F. A. HoLDEN. M.D. Thomas O'Rourke. M.D. 

Charles H. Cahn, M.D. Edward Talbott, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. 

Colon and Rectum 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Gynecology 

I J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

I Leo Brady, M.D. George L. Wissig, M.D. 

j William J. Flxton, M.D. 

I 

I Obstetrics 

j L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

\ J. G. M. Reese, M.D. M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

j Maxwell Mazer, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

' Maurice Shamer, M.D. 

Eye and Ear 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Charles Cahn. M.D. John G. Runkel, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



24 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

Dispensary Report from October 1, 1927 to September 30, 1928 

t Cases ^ 

Depabtments New Old Total 

Pediatrics 2.865 19,302 22,167 

Dermatology 5,072 9,947 15,019 

Surgery 2,440 8,525 10,965 

Obstetrics 1,700 5,955 7,655 

Medicine 1,610 4,364 5,974 

Genito-Urinary 841 4,953 5,794 

Gynecology 1,312 2,759 4,071 

Eye and Ear 1,296 2,695 3,991 

Orthopaedic 345 1,813 2,158 

Nose and Throat 1,010 953 1,963 

Neurology 239 1,080 1,319 

Gastro-Intestinal 197 702 899 

Cardiology Ill 374 485 

Proctology 113 334 447 

Tuberculosis 161 266 427 

Cystoscopy 33 160 193 



Total 19.345 64,182 83,527 

In addition to the above, there were treated in the State Venereal Clinic 
21,230 cases. 



MERCY HOSPITAL 25 

MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Washing- 
ton University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital came 
under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, but the 
Sisters continued their work of administering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, as 
it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly 
growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the 
Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the cornerstone of the 
present Hospital. This building was completed and occupied late 
in 1889. Since then the growing demands for more space has com- 
pelled the erection of additions, until now^ there are accommodations 
for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital 
to Mercy Hospital, 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 800,000 in- 
habitants. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Marv^land School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

It adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients from the 
public wards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates 
the clinical teaching, as there is no time lost in passing from one to 
the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Elec- 
tric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company and its branches. 



26 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman 
Sister M. Carmelita 
Sister M. Siena 
Sister M. Hildegarde 
Sister M. Anita 
Sister M. Euphrasia 



Dr. Alexius McGlannan 
Dr. Walter D. Wise 
Dr. Thomas K. Galvin 
Dr. Andrew C. Gillis 
Dr. Standish McCleary 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
SURGICAL DIVISION 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D. 
W. D. Wise, M.D. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 



Elliott Hutchins, M.D. 
A. M. Evans, M.D. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D. 



R. H. Locher, M.D. 
T. R. Chambers, M.D. 

I. O. RiDGLEY, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 



N. C. Marvel, M.D. 
D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 



Charles Maxson, M.D. 
A. B. McElwain, M.D. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D. 



Assistant Surgeons 



Dwight Mohr, M.D. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 
J. W. Nelson, M.D. 



Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Hakry Friedenwald, M.D. 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 



Associates 



J. W. Downey, M.D. 



Rhinologists and Laryngologists 



Frank D. Sanger, M.D. 
W. F. ZiNN, M.D. 



George W. Mitchell, M.D. 
Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 



Associates 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 

H. L. Rogers, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



27 



Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis, M.D. 

A88lsta7it 
Kenneth B. Leggee, M.D. 

Dentists 

John Frederick, D.D.S. 

J. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 
Physicimis 



Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 



Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 
C. C. W. Judd, M.D. 
H. R. Peters, M.D. 
Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 



Associates 



Assistant Physicians 



Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D. 



Cary B. Gamble, M.D. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 



George McLean, M.D. 
A. A. SussMAN, M.D. 
L. a. M. Krause, M.D. 
John E. Leggee, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 

S. A. TUMMINELLO. M.D. 



Oastro-Enterologist 
Julius Fbiedenwald, M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 



Associates 

Assista7its 

Pediatricians 



Theodore Morrison, M.D. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associate Pediatrician 
F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Assistant Pediatrician 
W. F. Schmitz, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 
Milford Levy, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Mklvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



28 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

A. Samuels, M.D. J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

W. S. Gardner. M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

G. A. Strauss, M.D. E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 

William S. Gardner, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. Abraham Samuels, M.D. 

T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Associate 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

Assistant 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spences, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. COLLENBERG 

H. R. Peters, M.D. Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians 

Sister M. Joan, Ph.G., R.N. Anna Chenoweth, R.N. 

Francis Donovan, R.N. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographers 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Habry L. Rogers, M.D. 

K. W. GOLLEY, M.D. 

Technician — Sister M. Antonia, R.N. 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 



29 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Resident Surgeon 
Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 

Assutant Resident Surgeons 

Simon Bbager, M.D. William N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

Resident Physician 
David Tennek, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician 



Resident Gynecologist 
E. Eugene Covington, M.D. 



Internes 



Eakl L. Chambers, M.D. 
Fred L. DeBarbieri, M.D. 
Sascha F. Guiglia, M.D. 
Joseph T. McAndrew, M.D. 
Israel P. Meranski, M.D. 



John E. Murphy, M.D. 

ISADORE NeISTADT, M.D. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D. 

O. Walter Spurrier, M.D. 

C. C. Stevenson, M.D. 



30 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 



A. M. Evans, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 

Surgery Supervisors 

H. F. BONGABDT, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons 



N. C. Marvel, M.D. 



D. H. MoHR, M.D. 

I. O. RiDGLEY, M.D. 

John O'Connor, M.D. 



H. F. BONGARDT, M.D. 
T. J. TouHEY, M.D. 



A. J. GiLLis, M.D. 



Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 



J. W. Nelson, M.D. 
Oenito-TJHnary Surgery 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 
Medicine Supervisor 

M. C. PiNCOFFS, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 
A. A. SussMAN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

S. A. Tumminello, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
A. A. SussMAN, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lungs 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
S. Snyder, M.D. 



K. B. Legge, M.D. 



Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



S. Snyder, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 



31 



Diseases of Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 



Attending Physicians 



T. Fbedejrick Leitz, M.D. 
M. Feldman, M.D. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 



Joseph Sindlee, M.D. 
I. I. Levy, M.D. 



Esophagoscopist 
W. F. Zinn, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Attending Physici<ins 



MiLFORD Levy, M.D. 



Robert Hodes, M.D. 



Pediatrics 
Supervisor, Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 
Attending Physician, W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

E. P. Smith, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 



Diseases of Women 
Supervisors 

Attending Surgeons 



A. Samuels, M.D. 
T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

C. F. J. COUGHLIN, M.D. 



E. Edlavitch, M.D. 



Diseases of Nose and Throat 



W. F. ZiNN, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



H. F. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



B. McGowAN, M.D. 
Diseases of Eye and Ear 

Bernard Wess, M. D. 

Dermatology 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 
Louis Small, M.D. 



M. Raskin, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Social Service Department 



Sister M. Helen, R.N. 



Virginia Judge 



S2 



MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 



Old 

Surgical 2,411 

Medical 1,932 

Gynecological 718 

Eye and Ear 562 

Nose and Throat 513 

Neurological 388 

Children 353 

Gastro-Intestinal 503 

Dental 81 

Rectal 117 

Orthopaedic 662 

Skin 536 

Genito-Urinary 3,833 

Roentgenology 

Total 12,609 



New 


Total 


903 


3,314 


1,113 


3,045 


334 


1,052 


364 


926 


526 


1,039 


117 


505 


256 


609 


108 


611 


70 


151 


41 


158 


233 


895 


205 


741 


596 


4,429 




377 



17852 



OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals to be 
used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily visits 
and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the Hospitals. 
The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in amount, 
thoroughness in study, and the use made of it in medical teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following separate 
hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 180 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 
The Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 



STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITAL 33 

STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

VISITING STAFF 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Tuberculosis Hospital. 

Harey Goldsmith, M.D., Physlcian-in-Charge of the Detention Hospital for 

the Insane. 
Wiley D. Forbus, A.B., M.D., Visiting Pathologist. 
George H. Rumsberg, M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

Otologist 
William Tarun, M.D., 

Gynecologists 

R. G. Willse, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist 
W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngologists 

H. R. Slack, M.D. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Pediatrician 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Oliver Smith, A.B., M.D. 

Psychiatrists 

Henry J. Berkley, M.D. 

Adolph Meyer, M.D. 

Orthopaedist 
H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Proctologist 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.B., M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Physician 
Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 
C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 
E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D. 



34 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution contains 62 beds for the active treatment of 
orthopaedic conditions. A new modern hospital building has just 
been constructed with every facility for operating and physiotherapy 
for bone and joint cases. It is situated just within the northwestern 
city limits on a large estate of 75 acres at Hillsdale. 

The hospital has endowed beds, private beds and beds supported 
by the city and state. The location is ideal for the treatment of 
bone and joint conditions of all characters in children having all the 
advantages of country air and sunshine, together with easy access 
from the city. 

A dispensary at the University Hospital is maintained for the 
cases which are discharged from the hospital. It is, in fact, the 
Children's Orthopaedic Dispensary at the University of Maryland 
and the close affiliation is maintained for teaching purposes as well 
as clinical care of the patients. The physiotherapy department is 
very well equipped with modern apparatus and trained personnel. 

STAFF 

SurgeoririnrChief and Medical Director 
RoBEET W. Johnson, Je., A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albeetus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons 
Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. Habey L. Rogees, M.D. 

Clement R. Moneoe, M.D. W. A. Simpson, A.B., M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 35 



Consulting Surgeons 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S. (Eng. Ire.) Hon. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Plastic Surgeon 
John Staige Da\^s, B.Sc, M.D. 

Neurosurgeon 
Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist and Aurist 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D., LL.D. 

Oculist and Aurist 
William Taeun, M.D. 

Laryngologist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Assistant Laryngolo gists 

F. B. Anderson, M.D. Allen Holden, M.D. 

Everett L. Bishop, M.D. Marshall P. Byerly, M.D. 

Dentists 
J. B. Bell. D.D.S. C. Merle Dixon, Jr., D.D.S. 

Consulting Physicians 

Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. Thomas R. Brown. A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist 
Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Derm<itologiM 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 



36 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 



Patlwlogist 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist 

HOWAKD J. MiLLDEIS, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Head Nurse 
Miss Grace Lovell Elgin, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse 
Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapists, Masseuses and Instructors in Corrective Gymnastics 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Miss Elizabeth Emory Miss Florence Grape 

Roentgenologists 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instructors in Grammar School 
Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal Miss Mary Sampson, Assistant 

Superintendent aiid Business Manager 
Mrs. M. E. Lane 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 



37 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland by the 
Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school to present 
to its students liberal opportunities for the study of diseases of 
infants and children. 



STAFF 



Obstetrician 
Dk. L. H. Douglass 



Dr. W. C. Bacon 

Dr. C. R. Goldsborough 



Pediatricians 



Dr. W. H. Ingram 
Dr. C. L. Joslin 



Surgeon 
Dr. N. Winslow 



Dermatologist 
Dr. J. A. BucHNEss 



Dr. C. a. Clapp 



Oculists 



Dr. F. B. Anderson 



Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Dr. W. H. Daniels 

Physician 
Dr. C. p. Clauticb 



Epidemiologist 
Dr. M. E. Ballard 



38 LIBRARIES 



LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the 
collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 29,659 volumes, a 
file of 76 current (medical) journals, and several thousand pam- 
phlets and reprints. It is well stocked with recent literature, in- 
cluding books and periodicals of general interest. The home of the 
Library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious building 
in close proximity to the classrooms and the Laboratories of the 
Medical Department. The Library is open daily during the year, 
except in August, for use of members of the Faculty, the students, 
and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
containing 60,000 volumes, is open to the students of the school. 
The leading medical publications of the world are received by the 
Library, and complete sets of many journals are available. Other 
Libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (215,355 volumes) and the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library (576,500 volumes). 

All these Libraries are open to the students of the school without 
charge. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision of 
teaching in this school in order to meet modern requirements. The 
multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery necessitates a 
very crowded course and the introduction of electives will very soon 
be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments : 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in the 
same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of the 
structures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory work 
occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of instructors insures attention to the 
needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of proficiency 
has disappeared and the student's final jgrade is determined largely 
by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work carried on 
throughout the course. 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 

AND EMBRYOLOGY 

C. L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, PhD Associate Professor of Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Frank H. Figge. B.S Assistant in Anatomy 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Monte Edwards, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D Assistant in Histology 

J. HuLLA, M.D Assistant in Histology 

R. W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Histology 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Four to five hours every day for 
approximately 20 weeks. The entire course centers around the 
dissection of the human body. Each student is given opportunity 
to dissect an entire half (left or right) of the body. The dis- 
section is supplemented by lectures and informal discussions. 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being laid 
on the human species as contrasted to animal morphology. An 
attempt is made to familiarize the student with the elements of 
anthropometry, with systematic and regional anatomy, with the 
principles of topographical anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of the 
body surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided for 
taking representative measurements of the head, face, trunk and 
limbs and of acquiring a knowledge of using anthropometric instru- 
ments. Throughout the dissection the student is encouraged to take 
measurements and weights of all the major organs, including the 
brain and the endocrine organs, and to obtain a knowledge of the 
proportions of each organ to the body as a whole as w^ell as to the 
variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to. topographical regions 
of the body, but systematic relations are continuously emphasized 
and, wherever possible, brought out by actual dissection. , 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the 
muscles and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto- 
muscular apparatus. Each student is provided with a set of bones 
to aid him in his homework. A charge of |6 is made for each set, 
|4 of which is returned at the end of the year, while the remaining 
?2 are used for the upkeep of old and the purchase of new skeletal 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

material. Fifty complete and perfect skeletons of the whole body 
and abont as many of the limbs are available for reference and spe- 
cial advanced work. 

At the end of the course the entire work is reviewed in a series 
of lectures presenting the entire anatomical basis of the most repre- 
sentative physiological activities, such as respiration, secretion, 
digestion, endocrine activity, parturition, etc. 

Second^ Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided for 
advanced special dissections and for research work in every branch 
of anatomy. Dr. Eduard Uhlenhuth. 

Histology and Embrj'ology 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, twelve 
hours each week for sixteen weeks. Histology and embryology are 
taught as a common subject, the histogenesis of a part preceding its 
histological study. 

The most important part of the work will be done in the labora- 
tory, where each student will be provided with apparatus, staining 
fluids and material necessary for the preparation of specimens for 
microscopical examination. An important aid to the course is the 
projection microscope and balopticon which are used for the pro- 
jection upon a screen of magnified images of the specimens actually 
used in the laboratory, and of illustrations from standard text- 
books. 

Each student is provided with a loan collection of histological 
slides, for which a deposit of $10 is required. This deposit is refunded 
upon the return of the slides in a satisfactory condition. Dr. C. L. 
Davis and Dr. J. F. Lutz. 

Neuro Anatomy 

During the second semester 36 hours are devoted to an elementary 
course in Neuro Anatomy. The human brain is dissected and micro- 
scopical sections of representative levels of the brain stem studied. 
Laboratory talks and lantern slide demonstration supplement the 
students work, the entire course being based on an effort to familiar- 
ize the student with the structure of the central nervous system as 
applied to its physiology. Dr. Carl L. Davis. 



42 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Ferdinand A. Ries, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

O. G. Harne, A.B Associate in Physiology 

First Year. Lectures, laboratory and recitations in physiology 
are given the last eight weeks of the first year. The physiology of 
the muscle and nerve, of the central nervous system and of digestion 
and secretion is taken up in lectures and laboratory. 

Second Year. A continuation of the first year course. The work 
consists of lectures and laboratory work on blood, circulation, in- 
ternal secretions, special senses, respiration and metabolism. 

Summary 

First Year Second Year 

Lectures and recitation 37 hours 72 hours 

Laboratory 64 hours 87 hours 

Total 101 hours 159 hours 



DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. E. Levin, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 



Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the second year during the first semester. This in- 
cludes the various methods of preparation and sterilization of cul- 
ture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bacteriological 
examination of water and milk. The bacteriological diagnosis of 
the communicable diseases is also included in this course. Animal 
inoculations are made in connection with the bacteria studied. The 
most important protozoa are also studied in the laboratory. The 
principles of general bacteriologj' are taught by quiz, conference 
and lecture. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes, 
conferences and lectures to the second-year class throughout the 
second semester, and practical experiments are carried out by the 
class in laboratory sessions of three hours each, held four days a 
week for eight weeks. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Feank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph. D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Rui^H F. Caer, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

Lectures 76 hours, 

Conferences 20 hours, 

Laboratory 120 hours. 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts 
of Biological Chemistry. The principal constituents and the phe- 
nomena of living matter are discussed in the lectures and studied in 
the laboratory. Training is afforded in routine biochemical methods 
of investigation. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA 

William Henry Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

John M. Haynes, B.A., M.A Instructor in Pharmacology 

Ruth Musseb, B.A Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Glenn Haene Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

1. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. Fifty-six hours re- 
quired. 

The prerequisites to this and the following courses in pharma- 
cology are college chemistry, pharmaceutical and biological chemis- 
try. Special courses in physical and colloidal chemistry are highly 
recommended. 

2. Systematic Pharmacology. Ninety-six hours required. Sec- 
ond year. In this portion of the course the student is taught Phar- 
macology as a pure science. The aim is to attain a mean between 
that which has a purely scientific bearing and that dominantly prac- 
tical, so that both a critical attitude toward drugs and an under- 
standing of the principles of dosage may be acquired. This is ac- 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

complished by lectures, quizzes, conferences and the following course 
of laboratory exercises. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. Ninety-six hours. Second Year. This 
laboratory course runs parallel with Pharmacology 2. 

In the first part of the course the experiments are upon normal 
animals (anaesthetised). Special emphasis is laid upon technic 
and upon the student's ability to record and properly analyze the 
results. 

The second half of the course partakes more of the character of 
experimental medicine. Pathological animals are treated with 
chemotherapeutic agents and the toxicity of the drug for the host 
and for the parasite are studied. Students who by this time have 
demonstrated ability and initiative are encouraged to do intensive 
work along lines of special interest. 

4. Pharmacology op General and Local Anesthetics and 
Soporifics. Four w^eeks, three lectures, three laboratory periods a 
week. This is a special course designed to meet the needs of physi- 
cian and graduate nurse who wish to acquire a knowledge of the 
more recent developments in the pharmacology of depressant and 
sleep-producing drugs. The course is so arranged that those properly 
qualified may continmue the work under expert anesthetists in the 
wards of the hospitals connected with the university. Professor 
Schultz. 

5. Research in Pharamacology and Chemo-Therapy. Properly 
qualified students are admitted to the laboratory with a view to 
their carrying on original investigations in drug action. Thoroughly 
equipped laboratories are well adapted for post-graduate study and 
research in Pharmacology. Hours will be arranged to suit the ap- 
plicant. Professor Schultz. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

■^ Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

-4- Sydney M. Cone, M.D , Associate Professor of Pathology 

tj^ Robert B. Wright, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

^ Albert E. Goldstein, M.D Associate in Pathology 

-i- Walter C. Merkle, M.D Associate in Pathology 

M. Alexander Novey, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Wm. S. Love, M.D Instructor in Pathology 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

A, A. SussMAN, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

HowABD M. BuBEBT, M.D InstructoF in Pathology 

Leon Fkeedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

M. H. Goodman, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

" C. Gordon Wabneb, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

George H. Rumberg, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in Pathology are given during the second 
and third years. These courses are based on previous study of nor- 
mal structure and function and aim to outline the natural history 
of disease. Instruction is made as practical as possible that the 
student may become familiar with the appearance of tissues in 
disease and may be able to correlate anatomical lesions with clinical 
symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology and Histo-Pathology. This course is 
given to second year students. It includes the study and demonstra- 
tion of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances of structure, 
nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of fat, carbohydrate 
and protein metabolism, disturbances in pigment metabolism, in- 
flammation and tumors. Appropriate sections and gross material 
are studied in the laboratory. 

2. Applied Pathology, Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. Third-year Students. In this course the special 
relationship of the gross and microscopial lesions to clinical symp- 
toms and signs is emphasized. Fresh material from autopsy col- 
lected at the various hospitals is demonstrated and supplemented 
by a study of the respective autopsy protocols. 

3. Autopsies. Third Year. Autopsy technique is taught to small 
* groups of students by special instruction at autopsies performed 

at the various hospitals. Students are required to assist at the 
autopsy, study the organs, examine the microscopical sections, make 
cultures and prepare autopsy protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathology Conference. Fourth Year. In collabora- 
tion with the Department of Medicine. Material from autopsies 
is studied with reference to the correlation of the clinical aspects 
with the pathological findings. 

0. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified students 
will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work along the 
lines of experimental pathology. 



46 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

GORDOX Wilson, M.D Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. GiCHNER, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. JuDD, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

C. C. Habliston, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Associate in Medicine 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate in Medicine 

A. A. SussMAN, M.D Associate in Medicine 

William Michel, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

M. G. GiCHNER, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

William A. Strauss, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Henry Sheppard, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

W. H. Woody, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Thomas C. Wolfe, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Henry C. Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Carl Benson, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

F. S. Waesche, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

A. ScAGNETTi, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

David Tenner, M.D Assistant in Medicine 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

GENERAL OUTLINE 

Second Year 

Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 
(1 hour a week, first semester.) 
(2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient department 
and in the clinical laboratory. 
II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neu- 
rology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical 
therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year 

The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical exami- 
nation, laboratory examination and progress notes of assigned 
cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 
(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week.) 

Medical Dispensary "Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University 
Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student 
spends two periods a week of two hours each in dispensary work. 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The work is done in groups of four to six students under an in- 
structor. Systematic history-taking is especially stressed. Physical 
findings are demonstrated. The student becomes familiar with the 
commoner acute and chronic disease processes. 



Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in 
topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

TJiird Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each sec- 
tion receives instruction for four hours a week for the entire session 
in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The large clinical mate- 
rial of the dispensaries and hosjjitals is utilized to give each student 
the opportunity to familiarize himself with the common types of 
bodily structure, with the normal variations in physical signs and 
with the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, circulatory and 
abdominal diseases. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are taken 
up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the prac- 
tical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the chief diseases 
is then reviewed. Two hours a week. Dr. Lockard. 

The principles of physical therapy are taught in a special lecture 
and demonstration course consisting of six one-hour periods. Dr. 
Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical appli- 
cation of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the chief 
therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in physi- 
cal diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sections of the 
class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Stress is laid upon 
the recognition of the physical signs of the disease, as well as upon 
its symptomatology and gross pathology. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis will be 
dealt with in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic management 
of syphilis will be offered in the dispensary. 



CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

M. G. GiCHNEE, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

William A. Strauss, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. HooPEB Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the 
technique of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able 
to perform all routine examination which may be called for during 
his fourth year, in connection with the work in the wards and 
dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lec- 
tures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the 
department takes an active part. The microscopical and chemical 
study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric juice, spinal fluid, 
feces and urine are successively taken up, and special attention 
directed to the clinical significance of the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent 
and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has his 
own microscope and is provided with blood counters and hemo- 
globinometer for his exclusive use, and every two students with a 
special laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned 
during the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affiliated 
hospitals. He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which is 
sufficiently complete to enable him to work independently of the 
general equipment. Special instructors are available during certain 
hours to give necessary assistance and advice. 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GASTROENTEROLOGY 

Julius Feiedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Feed Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Haeey Ulleich, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodoee H. Moeeison, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maueice Feldman, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachabiah Moegan, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindlee, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

N. J. Davidov, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Isidoee I. Levy, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Vance Hoopee, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Aubbey C. Smoot, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year. Clinics, recitations and demonstrations to the class 
for one hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary instruction 
to small groups throughout the entire session. Practical instruction 
in the differential and clinical diagnosis and demonstrations of the 
newer methods of diagnosis in gastro-intestinal affections. 



PSYCHIATRY 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

H. S. Sullivan, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Lewis B. Hill, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 

Haeey Goldsmith, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen clinical 
lectures and five clinics which are designed to be introductory to 
the more intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical con- 
ferences on selected groups of cases. Each student may work for a 
short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic, and thus 
gain practical experience of the problems of history-taking, exami- 
nation, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 



PEDIATRICS 

Edgab B. Feiedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

C. LoRiNG JosLiN, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Tkaband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

William J. Todd, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

William G. Geyer, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Clewell Howell, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Frederick Smith, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

R. M. Hening, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Marie Kovner, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

M. N. PuTTERMAN, M.D lustructor in Pediatrics 

A. H. FiNKELSTEiN, M.D InstructoT in Pediatrics 

T. Terry Burger, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

W. T. ScHMiTz, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

S. C. Feldman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Louis T. Lavy, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Henry Ginsberg, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Walter B. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 



Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of one 
lecture each week in which infant feeding and the most important 
diseases of infancy and childhood are especially emphasized. Drs. 
Joslin and Friedenwald. 

Fourth Year. During this year a weekly clinical lecture is given 
where the character of disease is fully demonstrated and the stu- 
dents are afforded an opportunity for personal examination of all 
cases. In addition, ward classes are held weekly where bedside in- 
struction is given. A section of the class also works daily at the 
Babies' and Children's Clinic. This clinic, which is under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Joslin, has a yearly attendance of more than twenty 
thousand, and offers an excellent opportunity for study and obser- 
vation of a wide variety of cases under competent instructors. 

Instruction is also given on the Children's Ward at the Mercy 
Hospital. 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., 

Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Neurology 

MiLFORD Levy, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Associate in Neurology 

Robert Hodes, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week to the 
entire class. Instruction in clinical neurology two hours a week 
at the City Hospital to small groups. By means of didactic lectures 
and clinical conferences, there are considered the commoner types 
of diseases of the nervous system, the methods of neurological 
examination, and the relationship of signs and symptoms to patho- 
logical conditions. The material at the University and Mercy Hos- 
pitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the en- 
tire class. This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hos- 
pitals. All cases presented at these clinics are carefully examined ; 
complete written records are made by the students who demonstrate 
the cases before the class. The cases are usually assigned one or 
two weeks before they are presented, and each student in the class 
must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close 
personal contact with the cases in the wards under the supervision 
of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four afternoons 
each week. In this way students are brought into contact with 
nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later manifestations. 



HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

M. G. TiiLL, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

Thi7'd Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. The 
lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: air, water, soil, 
food, disposal of wastes, communicable diseases, state and federal 
public health laws, and industrial diseases. Small groups visit the 
Sydenham Hospital weekly and are giv^n practical instruction in 
the diagnosis, treatment and isolation of the contagious diseases. 

Fourth Year. Small groups visit the City Board of Health Lab- 
oratories for practical instruction in the laboratory, field and admin- 
istrative aspects of public health work. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. One hour each week for one semester. 

Inasmuch as Medical Jurisprudence teaches the application of 
every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, civil or 
criminal, this course embraces the following: Proceedings in crimi- 
nal and civil prosecution ; medical evidence and testimony ; identity 
in its general relations; sexual abnormalities; personal identity; 
impotence and sterility; rape; criminal abortions; signs of death; 
wounds in their medico-legal relations; death, natural and homi- 
cidal; malpractice; insanity and medico-legal autopsies 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Industrial Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

E. S. Johnson, M.D Associate Professor of gurgery 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Surgery 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate in Surgery 

M. J. Hanna, M.D Associate in Surgery 

H. M. Foster, M.D Associate in Surgery 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate in Surgery 

C. F. HoRiNE, M.D Associate in Surgery 

I. O. Ridgley, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

H. F. BoNGARDT, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

DwiGHT MoHR, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. R. Geraghty, M.D .Assistant in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde Mar^tel, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. M. McElwain, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Thomas B. Aycock, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

S. H. Cl^lver, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the Anatomical Laboratory and the dis- 
pensaries, wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the 
University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and operating 
rooms of the Baltimore City Hospitals. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispensary 
work, bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The work 
begins in the second year, and continues throughout the third and 
fourth years. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 55 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed to 
bridge the gap between anatomy in the abstract, and clinical anat- 
omy as applied to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students 
are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the 
cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected when necessary to bring 
out outlines and relations of structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, aug- 
mented by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross section. 
Dr. Holland. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours a week for 8 weeks. Dr. Hanna, 
assisted by Dr. Johnson. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, 
records of physcial examinations and of operations and progress 
notes; the preparation of surgical dressings, suture materials and 
solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, 
fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage, shock and tumors; the use of 
splints, bed frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local anaesthesia 
and the preparation of patients for operations. Lectures and con- 
ferences. Two hours per week for one semester to the entire class. 
Dr. Edwards. 

Third Year 

I General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and gen- 
'^eral surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the entire 
class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Drs. Shipley and Wise. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in history- 
taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the bedside and 
in the dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospitals. Drs. Shipley, 
Lynn, Reifschneider and Hanrahan. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery 
upon the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, 
[and each sec^tion is given practical and individual work under the 
supervision of the instructors. Dr. Lynn, assisted by Drs. Winslow, 
Hay ward, E. S. Johnson, Foster, Geraghty, Demarco, Horine, Pes- 



56 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

sagno, Onnen, W. R. Johnson Steinmueller, Sigrist, Culver and 
R. W. Johnson. 

Fractures and Dislocations. This course consists of instruction 
in the various forms of fractures, dislocations and their treatment. 
There is a regular schedule of didactic lectures, which is supple- 
mented by practical demonstrations in diagnosis and treatment. 
This practical work is given at the Mercy, University and Baltimore 
City Hospitals. Drs. Lynn and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes the 
history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diagnosis, 
and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of the ambulatory 
surgical cases in the University and in the Mercy Hospitals. Mercy 
Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Ridgely, Touhey, Bongardt and 
McElwain. University Hospital — Drs. Holland, Lynn, Winslow, 
Edwards, E. S. Johnson and Foster. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic will be given at the Mercy and at the 
University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. As 
far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — Dr. 
McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the operating- 
room and museum are studied in the gross and microscopically, in 
relation with the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment of 
accident cases, with instructions as to the relationship between the 
state, the emi)loyee, the employer, and the physician's duty to each. 
One hour a week to sections of the class throughout the year. Dr. 
Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of University and of Mercy 
Hospitals, history-taking, and physical examination of patients, lab- 
oratory examinations, attendance at operations and observation 
of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will con- 
sist of ward rounds ; surgical diagnosis, treatment and the after-care 
of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlannan, Wise, Elliot 
Hutchins, Evans and Jennings. University Hospital — Drs. Shipley, 
Holland, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

ANAESTHESIA 

Second Year 

Lectures on history of anaesthesia : Ancient and Modern. General 
physiology of anaesthesia. Special physiology of each anaesthetic 
agent. Different methods for producing general anaesthesia, with 
a detailed description of each. The selection of the anaesthetic and 
method best suited for its administration in particular cases. Diffi- 
culties and accidents during and following anaesthesia, their causes, 
prevention and control. Different methods of resuscitation. Blood 
pressure : Its significance and bearing on selection of the anaesthetic 
and use as a guide during anaesthesia. 

Eight hours to the entire class. Drs. S. Griffith Davis and W. G. 
Queen. 

Fourth Year 
During the clinics and operations before small groups, each stu- 
dent will be required to observe the administration of anaesthetics 
and to keep a chart recording blood pressure, pulse and respiration 
under the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Haery M. Robinson, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

A. C. MoNNiNGER, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

M. H. Goodman, A.B., M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of the 
skin. 

Dispensary instruction. University Hospital, Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the common 
skin diseases. Drs. Abercrombie, Kobinson and Gately. Dispensary 
instruction, Mercy Hospital. Dr. Rosenthal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Robert W, Johnson, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

CoMPTON RiELY, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 



58 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Harey L. Rogees, M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Clement R. Monroe, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

W. A. Simpson, A.B., M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Clifford Lee Wilmoth, B.S., M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, M.D Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Raymond Lenhard, A.B., M.D Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 



In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary and Kernan 
Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children at ''Radnor 
Park" and in the Dispensary of the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics will be held at each of the hospitals named 
in town once a week. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic will be 
held for small sections of the class at ''Radnor Park" and Mercy 
Hospital. Daily teaching in the Dispensary will be stressed, 
nation, pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

The course will cover instruction in the special methods of exami- 
nation, pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

A brief outline and demonstration will also be given of the 
apparatus employed in Physiotherapy, Muscle Training and Correc- 
tive Gymnastics. 



ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D Instructor in Roentgenology 



An effort is made to familiarize the student with the appearance 
of normal Roentgenograms, after which instruction is given in the 
interpretation of the more common pathological lesions seen on the 
X-ray films and fluroscopic screen. The history, physics and prac- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 69 

tical application of Roentgen Rays are alluded to, but not stressed. 
Weekly demonstrations are given to sections of the fourth year class. 

DIATHERMY AND RADIUM THERAPY 

Charles Reid Edwards^ M.D., 
Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Students are taken in groups and are taught the indications for 
the use of radium in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant 
conditions. The course also includes the use of diathermy in the 
treatment of disease. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE 

Edward A. Looper, M. D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

W. F. ZiNN, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D.. . .Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
R. F. McKenzie, M.D Instructor in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common 
diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially directed 
to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance of focal infec- 
tions in the etiology of general diseases and modern methods of 
diagnosis. Lectures are illustrated by lantern slides. Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily to small sections at 
the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student is given oppor- 
tunity to study, diagnose and treat practical cases under an instruc- 
tor. Ward classes and clinical demonstrations are given one and 
one-half hours weekly throughout the session in the University and 
the Mercy Hospitals. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES 

W. H. TouLSON, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. GiLLis, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Harris Goldman, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Austin H. Wood, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

L. J. MiLLAN, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

K. D. Legge, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

H. C. Knapp, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 



60 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

H. T. CoLLENBERG, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

J. H. CoLLisoN, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

William Emrich, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Third Year. Eight hours to the entire class. This course is a 
didactic one in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. 
Toulson. 



Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystoscopy, ure- 
ter catheterization, renal functional tests, urography, urine cul- 
tures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the amphitheater, ward 
rounds, and attendance by members of the Senior class upon out- 
patients in the dispensary. The dispensary classes are carried on 
both at the Mercy and the University Hospital dispensaries. In the 
latter institution the Maryland State Department of Health con- 
ducts a venereal-disease clinic, in which 20,133 visits were paid last 
year. Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered, and this 
rich wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. In addi- 
tion to this, a cystoscopic clinic is conducted in another part of the 
dispensary, where the students are given practical instruction in the 
modern diagnostic methods. 



DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM 

G. Mllton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

L. J. Rosenthal, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

MoNTE Edwards, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Thvrd Year, Six hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexture, rectum and 
anus, and will cover the essential features of the anatomy and 
physiology of the large intestine as well as the various diseases to 
which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 61 

The class is divided into sections for clinical instruction in the 
Baltimore Citv Hospitals. Dr. Linthicum. 

Fourth Year. Ward and Dispensary instruction is given in the 
University and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of the vari- 
ous diseases are taught by direct observation and examination. 
The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope and examination of 
the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar to each student. Mercy 
Hospital — Drs. Blake and Rosenthal. University Hospital — Drs. 
Linthicum and Reeder. 

BRONCHOSCOPY AND ESOPHAGOSCOPY 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose 

Clinical Lectures and Demonstrations once weekly at University 
and Mercy Hospitals. 

Etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis and prophylaxis of foreign 
bodies in the air and food passages. Bronchoscopy as an aid in the 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs. Bronchoscopy as 
an aid to the surgeon. Diseases of the trachea. Diseases of the 
esophagus. All the phases of these subjects that the general prac- 
titioner should know are demonstrated clinically. 

OTOLOGY 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

The course in Otology is planned to teach a practical knowledge 
of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, its proximity and rela- 
tionship to the brain and other vital structures. The inflamatory 
diseases, their etiology, diagnosis, treatment and complications are 
particularly stressed, with emphasis upon their relationship to the 
diseases of children, head-surgery and neurology. 

Third Year. The entire class is given instruction by means of 
talks, anatomical specimens and lantern slides. 

Fourth Year. Small sections of the class receive instruction and 
make personal examinations of patients under the direction of an 
instructor. The student is urged to make a routine examination of 
the ear in his ward work in general medicine and surgery. 



62 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Chaeles E. Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

J. McF. Bebgland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

M. A. NovEY, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. J. Erwin, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

IsADORE A. SiEGEL, A.B., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Maurice Shamer, M.D ; Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by Drs. 
Bergland, Novak, Murray, Douglass and Rowland to entire class. 
Manikin Work, Drs. Brack, Smith and Erwin to sections of class at 
Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Reese, Novey, Siegel and Row- 
land at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week. Drs. 
Rowland, Douglass and Murray. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sections of 
class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese, Novey and 
Rowland. 

Each member of the Senior class is required to deliver twelve 
women in their homes under supervision of the teaching and resident 
staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Whlse, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Work. A course of thirty lectures and 
recitations. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 63 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward, makes a general physical examination, including the blood and 
urine, before the patient is brought before the class. One student 
under supervision gives the anaesthetic, a pelvic examination is made 
by six students, and any operation required is then done before a 
section of the class small enough to see clearly what is being done 
and how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole group examines, 
microscopically, sections prepared from material removed from 
patients that have been before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Professor of Ophthalmology 

M Randolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B.. M.D Assistant in Ophthalomolgy 

A. Lloyd MacLean, M.D., CM Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. First semester, Course in Diseases of the Eye. Dr. 
Randolph Kahn. 

Practical Course in Ophthalmoscopy, once weekly, in sections. 

Fourth Year. Clinics in Diseases of the Eye_, weekly, for one- 
half year. Dr. Clapp. 

Dispensary Instruction, daily to small sections. Drs. Kahn, 
Fleck, Kemler, Graff and MacLean. 

The course in Ophthalmology is designed to familiarize the 
students with the common diseases of the eye, their recognition and 
treatment, with a view to meet the needs of the general practitioner. 
Special emphasis is laid upon the relation between diseases of the 
eye and systemic diseases and diseases of other organs. 



64 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver^ A.B., M.D., Ph.D. i 

Professor of the History of Medicine ' 

During the past year the lectures have been entirely devoted to ^ 
the History of Medicine in the Eighteenth Century. Ten lectures 
in all were given. The first five v^^ere devoted to a general survey 
of Eighteenth Century medicine beginning with a description of the 
historical background of the period. The five remaining lectures 
were devoted to outstanding personalities in the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury such as the Hunters, Jenner, Auenbrugger, Lettson, Meade. 
Thanks to the cooperation of the oflQcial photographer to the Medi- 
cal Museum in Washington and to the photographic department of 
our own medical school the lectures were illustrated with long series 
of slides. Next year it is proposed to devote the entire time to the 
Nineteenth Century. After that the four years' circle of lectures 
will begin over again with early medicine, Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek 
and Roman. 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 



65 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 30, 1929, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1930 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 

12.00 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 




Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


12.00 
to 
1.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 

, 2.00 


Anatomy 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
A. H. 


Anatomy 
A. H. 


Anatomy 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
C. H. 




, 2.00 
to 
5.00 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 




j SECOND SEMESTER, FEBRUARY 3, TO MARCH 29, 1930 


9.00 

to 

12.00 

1 


Laboratory 

Anatomy 
(Feb. 3-Mar. 1) 


Laboratory 

Anatomy 
(Feb. 3-Mar. 1) 




Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratory 


(11.30-12.30) 

Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 


Anatomy 
(Feb. 3-Mar. 1) 


i 12.00 
1 to 
1.00 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 




(12.30-1.00) 
Lunch 




1.00 

to 

', 2.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Lunch 


Lunch 




(Feb. 3- 

Mar. 1) 
1 2.00-3.00 

and 
' 3.00-5.00 


Anatomy 
A. H. & C. H. 


Anatomy 
A. H. 


Anatomy 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 




Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 




(Mar. 3 to 

29) 

2.00 

to 

' 6.00 

1 


Neural 
Anatomy 



















FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 





SECOND SEMEST] 


ER, MARCH 31, TO MAY 24, 1930 




Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 

11.00 








Laboratory 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section A 
Physiology 
Section B 


Laboratory 
Biological 
Chemistry 
Section B 
Physiology 
Section A 




11.00 


Physiology 
C. H. 


Physiology 
C. H. 




to 
12.00 


(11.30-12.30) 

Biological 

Chemistry 

A. H. 




12.00 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 




to 
1.00 


(12.30-1.00) 
Lunch 




1.00 
to 
2.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Lunch 


Lunch 




2.00 
to 
3.00 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Physiology 
C. H. 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 

Physiology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 

Physiology 
Section B 




3.00 
to 
4.00 


Physiology 
C.H. 




4.00 
to 
5.00 







I.OCATIONS OF LECTURE HALI^ AND LABORATORIES: 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

C. H.— Chemical Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Biological Chemistry Laboratorj' — Third Floor, Dental Building, Lombard and 

Greene Streets. 
Histology and Embryology Laboratory— 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 

Neural Anatomy Laboratory, 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 



SCHEDULE 



67 



SECONDIYEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SESSION 1929-1930 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

9.00 to 
10.00 


^Physiology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


No Classes 
Scheduled 


10.00 

to 
11.00 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 




j 11.00 
1 to 
12.00 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Bacteriology 
A. H. 




12.00 to 
12.30 
P. M. 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(12-1 P. M.) 
Lunch 


Lunch 


(12-1 P. M.) 
Lunch 




12.30 
to 

; 1.30 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


(1-2 P. M.) 

Medicine 

A. H. 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


(1-2 P. M.) 

Physiology 

A. H. 




j 1.30 


(2-4 P.M.) 
Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


(2-4 P. M.) 
Physical 
Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 
Dlsp. 




to 
2.30 


(2.30- 
3.30 P. M.) 
Physiology 

A. H. 






Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 




1 2.30 
1 to 
: 6.30 











68 



SCHEDULE 



SECOND SEMESTER, SESSION 1929-1930 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A.M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 




Surgery 
A. H. 


Immunology 
A. H. 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section B 


Laboratory 

Pharmacology 

Section A 




9.30 

to 

10.30 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 




(Feb. 8-Mar. 1) 

(10-11) 

Surgical 

Anatomy 

A. H. 


10.30 

to 
11.30 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

A. H. 


11.30 
to 

12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(11-12) 
Surgery 
C. H. 


P.M. 

12.00 
to 
2.00 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


(12-1) 
Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


2.00 
to 
3.00 


(Mar. 3- 
May24 

Surgical 

Anatomy 

A. H. 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


(Mar. 10- 
May 24) 

Laboratory 

Surgical 
Anatomy 


(Mar. 10- 
May 24) 

Laboratory 

Surgical 
Anatomy 




3.00 
to 
5.00 


(Mar 10- 

May 24) 

Laboratory 

Surgical 
Anatomy 





LOCATIONS OF LECTURE HALLS AND LABORATORIES: 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall— Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall. N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Laboratories : 
Bacteriology— Sixth Floor, 32-34 S. Paca Street. 
Immunology— Sixth Floor, 32-34 S. Paca Street. 

Pathology — Third Floor, Dental Building. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Surgical Anatomy — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lomard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Univ. Hospital. Disp. — Dispensary, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets 
•Physiology Course Terminates January 26, 1930. 



IJ 



SCHEDULE 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SESSION 1929-1930 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


A. M. 

8.30 to 
9.30 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Therapeuticr 
C. H. 


10.30 to 
1 P.M. 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Svirgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 

Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch 


1 to 2 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 34 


Gynecology 
P. & S. 34 


(1.15 to 4.15) 

Clinical 
Pathology 
Laboratory 

32-34 
S. Paca St. 
6th Floor 


Transfer 


2.15 to 
3.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


(2.30-4.30) 

Section A 

Clinical 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


(2-3) 

Clinical 

Pathology 

P. & S. 34 


(2-4) 
Section B 
Clinical 
Medicine 


3.15 to 
4 15 


(3-4) 
Eye and Ear 
P. & S. 34 


Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Bay View 


4.15 
to 
5.15 


Pediatrics 
A. H. 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


(2.45-4.15) 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
Practical 
Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 
Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 

P. & S. 34 


Preventive 

Medicine 

C. H. 





From 10.30 A M. to 1.00 P. M. the class is divided into two sections, one section 
reporting at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, the other at Lombard and Greene Streets 
C. H.— Chemical Hall— X. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets 
A. H.— Anatomical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
^™PTr^°^P^^^^^^*^^~^°^'^^^^^^y Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S.— N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 

At the beginning of the second semester Section "A" at Baltimore Citv Hospital on 
Saturdays. 2-4 P. M., and University Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.15-4.15 P ^f • 
Section "B" at Baltimore City Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.30-4.30 P. M 



70 



SCHEDULE 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

SESSION 1929-1930 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 




Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


WardC.JiKe 


A. M. 














9.00 to 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


11.00 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 




Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology' 




Orthopaedic 


Medical 
Clinic 


Clinical 


Surgical 


Medical 


Pediatrics 


1.00 
to 


Surgery 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Pathological 
Conference 


Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


12.00 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Surgical 


Univ.Sec.C.H. 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Univ.Sec Amp. 


Univ.Sec Amp. 




P. & S. Sec. 51 


Pathology 
P. & S. Sec. 40 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 51 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P.M. 
12.00 to 2 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 




Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


Dispensary 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 




2.15 


Dermatology 
Clinic 


Neurology 
Clinic 


Eye and Ear 
Clinic 


Obstetrical 
Clinic 


Gastro-Enter- 
ology Clinic 


Genito- 
urinary 


to 


(Full Class at 




(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 


Clinic 


3.15 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ.Sec.Amp, 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


P. & S. Sec. 51 




Amp. 




Amp. 


Amp. 


Amp. 














Ward Classes 










P. & S. Sec. 










P. & S. Sec. 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Neurology 




3 30 


Ward Classes 






Medicine 


Psychiatry 




to 
5.00 


Medicine 

Urology 

Eye and Ear 


Therapeutics 

Proctology 
Radiotheraphy 


Medicine 
Roentgenology 

Preventive 
Medicine 


Nose & Throat 

Physical 
Therapeutics 


U. H. 

Orthopaedic 
Surgery 
Keman 
Hospital 












(5 to 6 P.M.) 








Univ. Sec. 




Univ. Sec. 


March, 






3.30 


Ward Classes 




Ward Classes 


April and 






to 






Medicine 


May 






5.00 


Medicine 
Urology 




Roentgenology 
Eye and Ear 


History of 

Medicine 

C. H. 







The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and 
Greene Streets, the other at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, 
then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. 
These groups will rotate on the following dates: 



FIRST SEMESTER 

1st period, Oct. 7— Nov. 9. 
2nd period, Nov. 11 — Dec. 14. 
3rd period, Dec. 16 — Feb. 1. 



SECOND SEMESTER 

1st period. Feb. 3— Mar. 8. 
2nd period, March 10— April 12. 
3rd period, April 14— May 17. 



C. H. — Chemical Hall — N, E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 

P. & S., 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 

P. & S., 40, 51— Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 71 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Registrar on the 
basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and is essential for 
admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical Stu- 
dent Certificate are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year high school course or 
the equivalent, and, in addition, at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits, including 
chemistry, biolog}^, physics and English. 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this University. 

(A) HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation from an accredited high or preparatory school, after 
pursuing a four-year course based upon an eight-year elementary 
course, or its full equivalent as demonstrated by entrance examina- 
tions. 

At least fifteen units must be offered.! 



SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED OR ACCEPTED 

FOR ENTRANCE TO THE PREMEDICAL 

COLLEGE COURSE 

Subjects Units* Required 

Group I, English— (I— II— III— IV) — 

Literature and Composition 3 3 

Gboup II, Foreign Languages — 

Latin 2-4 

Greek 2-3 

French or German 2rA [ 

Other foreign languages 2-4 i 

Group III, Mathematics — 

Elementary algebra 1 1 

Advanced geometry y^-1 

Plane geometry 1 1 

Solid geometry i/^ 

Trigonometry y^ 



72 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 



Group IV, Histoby and Economics — 

Ancient history 1 

Medieval and modern history 1 

English history 1 

American history i^-l 

Civil government 1/2-I 

Economics i^-l 

Gboup V, Science — 

Botany ^-1 

Zoology i^-l 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Physiography i^-l 

Physiology ^-1 

Astronomy ^ 

Geology ^-1 

Group VI, Miscellaneous — 

Vocational — including agriculture, 
economics, industrial, etc 



commercial, home 



1-4 



*A unit is the credit value of at least thirty-six weeks* work of four or 
five recitation periods per week, each recitation period to be not less than 
forty minutes. In other words, a unit represents a year's study in any 
subject in a secondary school constituting approximately a quarter of a full 
year's work. A satisfactory year's work in any subject cannot be accom- 
plished under ordinary circumstances in less than 120 sixty-minute hours, 
or their equivalent. 

tBoth of the required units of foreign language must be of the same 
language, but the two units may be presented in any one of the languages 
specified. 

JOf the fifteen units of high school work, nine units are required, as 
indicated in the foregoing schedule ; the remainder may be made up from 
any of the other subjects in the schedule, provided that at least eleven units 
must be offered in Groups I-V. 



(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two college 
sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each of actual instruction, 
including final examinations. 

6. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this pre- 
liminary college course shall be equal to the work done in the fresh- 
man and sophomore years in standard colleges and universities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in physics, 
chemistry, biology and English, each course to embrace at least six, 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 73 

eight or twelve hours of work in each subject, as shown in the 
schedule following: 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PREMEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Semester 

Requibkd Courses : Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Courses Strongly Urged : 

A modern foreign language 
Comparative vertebrate anatomy 
Psychology 
Social science 

Beginning with the session of 1930-31 one year (6 semester hours) 
of a modern foreign language will be required. 

A semester hour is tlie credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of 
one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less than 
fifty minutes' duration net, at least, two hours of laboratory work to be 
considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required of which at least 
eight semester hours must be in general inorganic chemistry, includ- 
ing four semester hours of laboratory work, and four semester hours 
in organic chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis 
may be counted as general inorganic chemistry. 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at least 
two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes a knowledge 
of plane trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four must 
be laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course 
of eight semester hours in either general biology or zoology, or by 
courses of four semester hours each in zoology and botany, but not 
by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual introduc- 
tory college course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, is 
required. 



74 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum if offered, leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first 
three years are taken in residence at College Park, and the last four 
years in Baltimore, at the School of Medicine. The premedical cur- 
riculum constitutes the first two years' work, and the third year 
follows a general outline of prescribed and elective courses approved 
by the chairman of the premedical committee and the dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of 
Medicine, and upon the recommendation of the dean, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science may be conferred by the College of Arts and 
Sciences at College Park. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this com- 
bination course offers over the minimum requirements of the two 
years. By completing three years the training may be gradually 
broadened by a wider latitude in the election of courses in the arts 
subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior 
year without being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, with- 
out examination, may receive a certificate of attendance on com- 
pleting the full course satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth-year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
are the same as those enforced against undergraduates admitted to 
advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses — In the April number of the 
Bulletin detailed announcement will be made of the Post-Graduate 
Summer Courses. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any j^ear in the course, 
he must pay regular fees. 



RULES AND FEES 75 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at the 
end of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of 
the fourth year and to take examination in such other branches as 
may be required should he again be permitted to enter the school as 
a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his 
examination. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the University 
of Maryland are required to provide themselves with microscopes 
of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spencer 
Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, will fill 
the requirements: 

Triple nose piece 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe) 1.9mm. 1.25 N.A. Oil Immersion 

Lens 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
3^ear ending June 7th, 1930 only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, the requirements for graduation, the 
fees and in any of the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it 
expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 300.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 450.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 25.00 

Special and re-examination fee 5.00 

Graduation fee 15.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution in any class for the session beginning September 30, 1929. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register 
at the Registrar's Oflice. The last date of registration is October 
7th, 1929. 



76 PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Matriculation, laboratory and tuition fees for the first semester 
shall be paid at the time of registration, and for the second semester 
on or before February 3rd, 1930. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar the 
student from attendance on classes and other privileges of the 
University. 

Students who fail to pay the tuition and other fees on or before 
the last day of registration for each term or semester, as stated in 
the catalogue, will be required to pay as an addition to the fees 
required the sum of Five (^5.00) Dollars, and if the payment so 
required shall not be paid before twenty (20) days from the begin- 
ning of said term of semester, the student's name shall be stricken 
from the rolls. 

When offering checks in payment of tuition and other fees, stu- 
dents are requested to have same drawn in the exact amount of 
such fees. Personal checks whose face value is in excess of the fees 
due will be accepted for collection. 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students, 
if at the time of their registration their parents or guardians have 
been residents of this State for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students, if at the 
time of their first registration they have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time 
of his first registration in the University, and may not thereafter 
be changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents or 
guardians move to and become legal residents of this State. 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 
To stimulate study among tie candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the highest 
average during the four years of his course. Certificates of Honor 
are awarded to the five candidates standing next highest. 

DR. JOSE L. HIRSH MEMORIAL PRIZE 
A prize of |50.00 is given each year by Mrs. David Myers as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Jose L. Hirsh, formerly Professor of 



SCHOLARSHIPS 77 

Pathology in this School, to the student in the third year who has 
done the most satisfactory work in Pathology- during his second and 
third years. 

DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither 
as a memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student in 
the senior class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 
(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of 
this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University each year upon nomination by the Medical Council ''to 
a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is aw^arded to a second, third or fourth year 
student who has successfully completed one year's work in this 
school, and no student may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 

(Value $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School 
of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of 
the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the 
Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by the Medical 
Council to students who have meritoriously completed the work of 
at least the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to 
the Faculty satisfactory evidence of a good moral character and of 
inability to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 



78 SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, 
M.D., LL.D. 

It is aw^arded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to a 
"needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the 
Medical School." 

'^He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship 

(Value, $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky 
as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an 
alumnus of this University. 

The scholarship is awarded to a second-year student who at the 
end of the first year passes the best examination in Anatomy, 
Histology, Embryology, Physiolog}^ and Biological Chemistry. 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University. One to a student 
of the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the President, to 
be held for only one year; the other, which entitles the holder to 
exemption from payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded 
annually by the Medical Council to a student of the Senior Class 
who presents to the Medical Council satisfactory evidence that he is 
of good moral character and is worthy of and in need of assistance 
to complete the course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late Mrs. 
Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 



SCHOLARSHIPS 79 

raent of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to a third-jear 
student who at the end of the second year passes the best practical 
examination in Anatomy, Physiology, Biological Chemistry, Phar- 
macology, Pathology, Immunology and Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 
(Valuation, $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from the 
income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships will be available to 
students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. Preference 
is given to students from the counties of the State of Maryland 
which the Medical Council may from time to time determine to be 
most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, after gradu- 
ation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the practice of 
medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to which the student 
is accredited or in a county selected by the Council. In the event 
that a student is not able to comply with the condition requiring him 
to practice in the county to which he is accredited by the Council, 
the money advanced by the Regents shall be refunded. 

Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen Scholarships 

(Value, $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in 
memory of her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and 
conditions : 

This scholarship will be available to students of any one of the 
classes of the course in Medicine ; preference is given to students of 
the counties of the State of Maryland which the Medical Council 
may from time to time determine to be most in need of medical prac- 
titioners. Any student receiving one of these scholarships must, 
after graduation and a year's interneship, agree to undertake the 
practice of medicine for a term of two years in the county to which 
the student is accredited, or in a county selected by the Council. 



80 HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

Daughters of Harmony Scholarship 

(Value, $100.00) 

This scholarship is given each year by the Daughters of Harmony 

as part payment of the tuition of a needy student of good character. 

He must be a member of the senior class and a bona fide resident 

of Baltimore He must be nominated by the Medical Council. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

On February 1st of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school: 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons Two Resident Obstetricians 

Two Resident Physicians Thirteen Junior Residents on a 

One Resident Gynecologist Rotating Service 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for the 
summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician One Resident Gynecologist 

One Assistant Resident Physician One Resident Obstetrician 

Chief Resident Surgeon Eight .Junior Residents on a Rotat- 

Five Assistant Resident Surgeons ing Service 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 81 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in Balti- 
more as in any large city in the United States. The following esti- 
mates of a student's personal expenses for the academic year of eight 
months have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual 
experience : 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $50 

College Incidentals 20 

Board, eight months 200 

Room rent v 64 

Clothing and laundry 50 

All other expenses 25 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Secretary 
of Student Y. M. C. A., who may be found at his office on the 
premises, will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient 
boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland^ M. D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



20 


20 


250 


275 


80 


100 


80 


150 


50 


75 



82 MATRICULATES— 1928-29 

MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, 1928-1929 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 



AcKERMANj Jacob Harold^ A.B., 

New York 

Alessi, Silvio A., Ph.G Maryland 

Amos, Hugh, B.S Ohio 

Anderson, Walter Anders, D.D.S., 

Ph.G Maryland 

Bardfeld, Benjamin B New Jersey 

Barland, Samuel, Jr., B.S. ..New York 

Bernhard, Robert New York 

BiRBLY, Morris Franklin, A.B., 

Maryland 
BoNGiOBNO, Henry Domenic, Ph.G., 

New Jersey 

BOTSCH, Bernard, B.S Ohio 

BowEN, James Poore, B.S., 

South Carolina 

Brahms, Max, B.S New York 

Brauer, Selig Leo New Jersey 

Galas, Andres Eladio Cuba 

Chambers, Earl LeRoy Maryland 

Chapman, William Hardee. ..Maryland 

Christian, William Pennsylvania 

Ciccone, Arnold William, 

Rhode Island 
Clark, Francis Alden, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Cohen, Herman New Jersey 

Cohen, Paul Henry, A.B Maryland 

Conn, Jacob Harry, A.B Maryland 

CoRSELLO, Joseph Nicholas, B.S. 

New York 
Dailey, William Paul. . .Pennsylvania 
Daniels^ Willard Floyd, B.S., 

West Virginia 
DeBarbieri, Fred Louis, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Draper, William Bateman. . .Maryland 
Farbman, Meyer D.avid, B.S..New York 
Fabgo, William Russell, A.B., 

Maryland 
Fattel, Henry Charles, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Feingold, Charles Rodin, B. S., 

New York 

Feit, Emanuel, B.S New York 

FiFER, Jesse Showalter, A.B., 

Delaware 

Garber, Jacob S New York 

Givnbr, David, A.B Maryland 

Gouldman, Edwin Foster, B.S., 

Virginia 



GuiGLiA, Sascha Facchetti. .New York 

Haney, John James New Jersey 

Heck, Leroy Savin, B.S., Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Helms, Samuel Thomas, B.S.. .Virginia 
HoLROYD, Frank Jackson, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 
Horowitz, Morris, A.B.. .Massachusetts 
HusTED, Samuel HARLEY...New Jersey 
ISERN, Rafael Angel Vil.^r, B.S., 

Porto Rico 
Jackson, Murray Elliot, B.S., 

New York 

Jacobs, Abraham, B.S New York 

Kelly, Clyde Ernest, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Kendall, Benjamin Horton, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Knight, Walter Phillips . Pennsylvania 

Levi, Ernest, Ph.G Maryland 

Levy, Walter Howard New York 

Lynn, Irving, B.S New Jersey 

Lynn, John Galloway, 4th. .Maryland 

Matsumura, Junichi Hawaii 

McAndrew, Joseph Theodore, 

West Virginia 
McDowell, Roy Hendrix, A.B., 

North Carolina 
McGowAN, Joseph Francis, 

Pennsylvania 
Meranski, Israel Peter, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Morgan, Isaac Joseph, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Murphy, John Edward. . .Pennsylvania 
Neistadt, Isidore Irving, A.B., 

Maryland 
Neuman, Finley Frederick, A.B. . .Ohio 
Newman, Saul Charles, B.S., 

Connecticut 
NicKMAN, Emanuel Harbison, 

New Jersey 
Overton, Lewis Marvin, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Penchansky, Samuel Joseph, B.S., 

New Jersey 

POETERFIELD, MAURICE COLEMAN, 

Maryland 

Prager, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Reeder, Paul Arlington, B.S., 

West Virginia 



MATRICULATES— 1928-29 



FOURTH YEAR 

Reilly, John Vincent New Jersey 

Roberts, Eldred, B.S Maryland 

Safer, Jake Victor Florida 

Safford, Henry Towne, Jr Texas 

ScHREiBER, Morris Bernard. .New York 

SCHWAKTZBACH, SaUL, A.B., 

District of Columbia 

Seibel, Jack, B.S New York 

Sekerak, Raymond Andrew, 

Connecticut 
Serra, Lawrence Mario, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Sikorsky, Albert Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 
Silver, Mabel Irene, B.S.. . .Maryland 
Soifer, Albert Alexander, B.S., 

Maryland 

Solomon, Milton, B.S New York 

Speicher, Wilbur Glenn. .. .Maryland 

Spencer, Ernest Maryland 

Spurrier, Oliver Walter, A.B., 

Maryland 



CLASS — Continued 

Staton, Leon Raphael, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Stevenson, Charles Calvert. .. .Utah 
Sullivan, William Joseph, 

Rhode Island 

Tannebaum, Morris, B.S New York 

Taylor, Charles Vivian, A.B., 

Maryland 

Ullrich, Henry Franz Maryland 

Vann, Homer King Florida 

Vestal, Tom Fletcher.. North Carolina 

Volenick, Leb Joseph New York 

Wallack, Charles Albert, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Ward, Hugh Walter, A.B. . . . Maryland 
Waters, Zack James, B.S., 

North Carolina 

Weiss, Aaron New York 

Wilkerson, Albert Russell, Ph. G., 

Maryland 
Y^eager, George Herschel, B.S., 

Maryland 
Yudkoff, William, B.S New Jersey 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 



Aronofsky, Milton Robert, Ph.B., 

Connecticut 

Ashman, Harry, B.S New York 

Baumgardner, George Martin, A.B., 

Maryland 
Baylus, Meyer Milby, Ph.G. .Maryland 

Belinkin, William, B.S New York 

Benfer, KZenneth Louis, A.B. .Maryland 
Berkowitz, Rudolph, A.B....New York 
Berry, Erwin Phifeb. .North Carolina 
Blum, Joseph Sydney, Ph. .G.Maryland 
Bonner, Merle Dumont, 

North Carolina 
Brown, Eugene Scott, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Burns, John Howard, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 
Chance, Lester Thomas, B.S., 

North Carolina 

Chenitz, William, B.S New Jersey 

Cohen, Archie Robert, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Cohen, Irving Joseph, Ph.G.. Maryland 
Cohen, Max Hurston, Ph.G.. .Maryland 
Coppola, Matthew Joseph, B.S., 

New York 
Durrett, Clay Earle, B.S.. . .Maryland 
Dyar, Edna Gerbish, Ph.D., 

District of Columbia 
Fabinacci, Charles Joseph, A.B. ..Ohio 
Faw, Wylie Melvin, Jb Maryland 



Feman, Jacob George, A.B.. . .New York 
Fiocco, Vincent James, B.S. .New Y'ork 

Fisher, Samuel New Jersey 

Ford, John Leonard, B.S. .Pennsylvania 
Forrest, Daniel Efland, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Garey, James Lyman, B.S. .Pennsylvania 
Garfinkel, Abraham, B.S....New York 
Gerner, Harry Ezekiel, B.S. New Jersey 

Gersten, Paul Francis New York 

Ginsberg, Leon, Ph.D New York 

Goldman, Lester Milton, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Goldstein, Jacob Everett, B.S., 

New York 
Goodman, Julius Henry, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Hamer, William Alexander, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Harrell, Leon Jackson, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Harsha, Gene Melford, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Helms, John Chapman, B.S.. . .Virginia 
Hildenbrand, Emil John C, B.S., 

Maryland 
Hill, George Delmas, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Hornbaker, John Harlan, A.B., 

Maryland 
Hudson, Rollin Carl, A.B Maryland 



84 



MATRICULATES— 1928-29 



THIRD YEAR 

Jackson, Marshall Vaden, 

North Carolina 
JOHXSON, Marius Pitkin, A.B., 

Connecticut 
Keller, Frederick Doyle, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Kleinman, Abraham Morris, B.S., 

New York 
KovARSKY, Albert Elias, A.B.. 

New Jersey 
Kraemer, Samuel Harry, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Kremen, Abraham, A.B Maryland 

KuHN, Esther Frances, A.B. .Maryland 
Levin, Morton Loeb, Ph.G.. .Maryland 

Levy, Solomon, A.B Palestine 

Lewis, Frank Russell, Maryland 

Mace, Vernie Emmett, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Magovern, Thomas Francis. .New Jersey 
♦Maloney, Leonard Eugene, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Mansdorfer, George Bowers, B.S., 

Maryland 
Miller, Benjamin Herman, A.B., 

Maryland 

Miller. Isaac New Jersey 

Miller, James Alton, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Montilla, Victor Jose Porto Rico 

Mortimer, Egbert Laird, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 
MosER, Charles Yarnall, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Needle, Nathan E Maryland 

Oliver, Robert Dbleon, B.S., 

North Carolina 



CLASS — Continued 

Oppenheim, Joseph Harry.. New York 
Owen, Duncan Shaw... North Carolina 
Owens, Zack Doxey, B.S., 

North Carolina 

Perlman, Robert, B.S New York 

Reii>, Francis Fielding, A.B., 

Maryland 
RiNEBERG, Irving Edward, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Romano, Nicholas Michael 

Pennsylvania 
Rosenthal, Abnee Herman, B.S., 

New York 

Shill, Benjamin, A.B New Jersey 

Shulman, Louis Robert Maryland 

Smith, Joseph Jacob, A.B. ..Connecticut 
Snoops, George John, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 

Snyder, Nathan, Ph.G Maryland 

Soltroff, Jack Gerson, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Sperling, Nathaniel Mortimer, B.S., 

New York 
Strickland, Horace Gilmorb, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Thompson, Carl Truman, B.S., A.B., 

West Virginia 
Warman, Wilton Merle, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 

Wein stein. Jack, B.S New York 

Werner, Aaron Sbth New York 

WooLLEY, Alice Stone, B.S. . .New York 

Young, Ralph Funk Maryland 

Zeigpr, Samuel, B.S New York 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 



Adalman, Philip, Ph.G Maryland 

Allen, Howard Stanley. . .Pennsylvania 
Andrew, David Holmes, A. B.. Maryland 
Baldwin, Kenneth Malison, 

Connecticut 
Bamberger, Beatrice, A.B. . . . Maryland 

Barton, Paul Canfield, B.S Ohio 

Baumgartner, Eugene Irving, A.B., 

Maryland 

Berman, Henry Irving Maryland 

Brice, Arthur Talbott Maryland 

Brill, Bernard New York 

Brill, John Leonard, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Contract, Eli, A.B Maryland 

Davis, Melvin Booth, B.S Maryland 



Dawson, William Maddren, B.S., 

New York 
DoNonuE, Bernard Walker, A.B., 

Maryland 
Drbnga, Joseph Francis, A.B. .Maryland 

Eckstein, Harry, B.S New York 

Edel, John Wesley, B.S Maryland 

Eisenberg, David, B.S New York 

Ernest, Roy Cooper, A.B Ohio 

Feldman, Samuel, A.M Maryland 

Feuer, Arthur, B.S New York 

Fitch, Wilmer Price New York 

Foster, Ruth Massachusetts 

Friedman, Joseph, B.S New York 

Grossman, Isadore, A.B Maryland 

Grove, Donald Birtner Maryland 



•Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES— 1928-29 



e5 



SECOND YEAR 

Gdndrt, Rachel Kbebs, A. B. .Maryland 
Helpkich, Raymond Fredebick, A.B., 

Maryland 

Hoffman, Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Hollander, Mark Bcckner. A.B., 

Maryland 
HoRNBROOK, Kent Maidlow, 

West Virginia 
Jacobson, Samuel Maurice, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Jaklitsch, Frank Henry, B.S., 

New York 

Jensen, Carl Dana F Washington 

Jett, Page Covington, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Jones, Arthur Ford Maryland 

Karger, Abraham, B.S New York 

Kaufman, Max, Ph.G New York 

Keefe, Walter Joseph, A.B., 

Connecticut 
Kermisch, Albert, Ph.G., B.S., 

Maryland 

Kilgus, Johm Frank Pennsylvania 

KoHN, Walter Maryland 

Krieger, Jerome Leon, A. B.. .Maryland 

Lachman, Harry, B.S Maryland 

LfANG, Abraham, B.S New York 

Langeluttig, Harry Veenon, A.B., 

Maryland 
Lerner, Philip Frank, A.B. . .Maryland 
Leshine, Sidney Starr, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Levine, David Robert, B.S. ..New York 

LuBiN, Paul Maryland 

Mahan, Edgar Wade, B.S.. Pennsylvania 
Mankovich, Dbsiderius George, 

Pennsylvania 
Martin, Thomas Adrian, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Masterson, John Francis.. New Jersey 

Meyer, Leo Martin, A.M New York 

MoYERS, Waldo Briggs, A.B., 

West Virginia 
Murphy, Richard Lawrence, A.B., 

New Hampshire 

*Did not complete the year. 



CLASS — Continued 

NocERA, Francisco Paolo. . .Porto Rico 
Palitz, Leo Solomon, A.M... New York 
♦Post, Charles Gordon, A.B., 

New York 
Hehmeyer, Walter Owen, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Rodriguez, Manuel Porto Rico 

Rohm, Robert Franklin. .Pennsylvania 
Rosenberg, Benjamin, B.S.. . .New York 
Rosenthal, Henrietta Estelle, Ph.B.. 

Maryland 

RozuM, John Charles New York 

Schimunek, Emmanuel Aloysius, A.B., 

Maryland 
Seabold, William Mervbn ... Maryland 
Seidman, Herman Harold, B.S., 

New York 
Shaw, Christopher Campbell, Ph.B., 

Maryland 
Shelley, Harry Sandberg, B.S., 

Maryland 
Shochat, Albert Joshua, B.S., 

New York 
Siwinski, Arthur George, A.B., 

Maryland 

Skovron, Michael, B.S Pennsylvania 

Slate, Marvin Longworth, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Slavcoff, Alexander, B.S. .Pennsylvania 

Smith, Solomon, A.B Maryland 

Sprbcher, Milford Harsh, B.S., 

Maryland 

Sterling, Susanne Maryland 

Stevens, Russell Alvin, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Taylor, Robert Bruce. . . .Pennsylvania 
Van Ormer, William Alfred, 

Pennsylvania 
Warren, Edward William. . .New York 

Wigderson, Henry, B.S New York 

*WoJicK, William Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 



MATRICULATES— 1928-29 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 



Abrashkin, Mortimer Dick, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Ahroon, Carl Richard, A.B. .Maryland 

Alagia, Lucia Carmela Maryland 

Ashman, Leon, B.S Maryland 

Bhadenkopf, Anna Lucille, A.B., 

Maryland 

♦Belford, Joseph, Ph.G Maryland 

Blum, Samuel Daniel, B.S. ..New York 
Bell, Charles Raymond, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Bell, James Russell Pennsylvania 

Bercovitz, Nathan New York 

Berger, Herbert New York 

BiELiNSKi, Leon Bernard. .Pennsylvania 
Blum, Samubl Daniel, B.S.. .New York 
BoGER, WiLLiAii Jonas, A.B., 

North Carolina 
BoGGESs, John Paul, A.B., 

West Virginia 

BoGORAD, Daniel Emil Maryland 

Brown, William Edward. .. .California 

Bter, Jacob, A.M New York 

Cannon, Martin Ohio 

Chimacoff, Hyman New Jersey 

Clayman, David Stanford, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
CooNEY, Joseph William, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Corriere, Josef, B.S Pennsylvania 

Crecca, Anthony Daniel. . .New Jersey 
Currie, Dwight McIver, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Davis, Carroll Kalman New York 

Davolos, Joseph John Delaware 

Demarco, Salvatoke Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 
Diamond, Joseph George... New Jersey 

DuMLER, John Charles Maryland 

•Easterday, Carroll Edward Lee, 

Maryland 

Eichert, Herbert, Ph.G Maryland 

Eisenbbandt, William Henry, A.B., 

Maryland 

♦Elliott, Alice Winifred Ohio 

Palk, Sigmund, A.B New York 

Fein, Jack, B.S New York 

Fishbein, Elliot, M.S New Jersey 

Flom, Charles, Ph.G Maryland 

France, Andrew Menaris, B.S., 

Maryland 

Ganz, Samuel Evans, A.M New York 

Geller, Samuel, B.S New Jersey 

Gbrshenson, David Abraham, A.B., 

Maryland 



GiROUARD, Fernand Louis .. .Connecticut 
Gittleman, Solomon Ellman.Ncw York 
Glass, Albert Julius, Ph.G... Maryland 
Gluckman, Albert Gerson, B.S., 

Delaware 
Gorenberg, Harold, A.B....New Jersey 

Grollman, Ellis, Ph.G Maryland 

Grosh, Joseph Walter, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Halpekin, David New Jersey 

Hammell, Frank Mull New Jersey 

Hanagan, John Joseph, B.S., 

New Hampshire 

Hantman, Irvin, Ph.G Maryland 

♦Harrington, Peter Francis, 

Rhode Island 

Harris, Jacob, A.B New York 

Hecht, Manes Schever, A.B. .Maryland 
Hendler, Hyman Bernard. .. .Maryland 

Hull, Harby Clay Maryland 

Jacobson, Meyer William, A.B., 

Maryland 

Jones, Grace Germania Maryland 

Kaplan, Abraham Nathan, M.S., 

New York 

Karfgin, Arthur Maryland 

Katz, Abraham, B.S New York 

Katz, Leonard Maryland 

Katzenstein, Lawrence, B.S.. Maryland 

Keisbr, Sylvan New York 

Kimmel, Charles New Jersey 

KiNGSLEY, Alton Mason. . . Pennsylvania 

Klimes, Louis Frank Maryland 

*Klingensmith, Frederick Chester, 

Pennsylvania 

KOROSTOFF, Bernard New York 

Kress, Milton Bernard Maryland 

Kbisger, Alexander Allan, 

Pennsylvania 
Kriete, Eduard William, B.S.. Maryland 

Layne, Frank Hopkins Kentucky 

Lechner, Sidney Israel, B.S..New York 

Lefkowitz, Jacob, B.S New York 

Legum, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Lent, Sylvester Mead, B.S., 

Connecticut 

Ler'ner, George, A.M New York 

Lieberman, Samuel, M.S New York 

Louft; Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Markman, Harry David, B.S..New York 
McCauley, Lewis Ross, Ph.G., 

Pennsylvania 
McGovERN, William Joseph, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
McMillan, William Owen, 

West Virginia 



*Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES— 1928-29 



87 



FIRST YEAR CLASS— Continued 



MiCKLBY, John Hoke, B.S.. Pennsylvania 
Miller, Myron Joseph, A.B. .New York 

MooRES, John Duer Maryland 

Myers, George Thomas, A.B. .Maryland 
Myles, Harry Seig, B.S.. .West Virginia 

Nachlas, Arthur, A.B Maryland 

Newnam, Alpheus Carlton. . . M^iryland 
Panebianco, Richard Robert, B.S., 

New York 
Patterson, Robert Compton, 

West Virginia 

Pear, Henry Robert Maryland 

Philip, Arthur Jay, B.S New York 

Pink, Solomon Harris New Jersey 

* Posey, Charles Fry Pennsylvania 

Prigal, Samuel Jeremiah, B.S., 

New York 
Proctor, Samuel Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 
Prussack, Solomon, M.S. ...New Jersey 
Reckson, Morris Murray. . . .New York 

Richardson, Jack West Virginia 

♦Roberto, Frank Paul, A.B. ..Maryland 
Roberts, Marion Butler, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Rohm, Jack Zeth Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Stephen Isaiah, 

Pennsylvania 
Ruben, William Merwin, Ph.G., 

Maryland 

Rubenstein, Robekt New Jersey 

Sager, Harold New Jersey 

•Did not complete the year. 



Saunders, Thomas Sewell, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Savage, John Edward, B.S., 

District of Columbia 
Schnabel, William Thomas, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Schubart, George Rudolph, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Schwartz, David Israel, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Senger, Joseph Anton, Ph.G. . Maryland 

Shack, Max Herman New Jersey 

Shaw, John Jacob, A.B New Jersey 

Siegel, Sidney Leon New Jersey 

SiLVERSTEiN, George, A.B. . . Connecticut 
Simmons, John Frederick. . .Maryland 
Smoot, Marvin LeRoy. .. North Carolina 

Snyder, Jerome, Ph.G Maryland 

SoLLOD, Aaron Charles, Ph.G.. Maryland 
*Spellmax, Edward Thomas, 

Pennsylvania 
Statman, Arthur James.... New Jersey 

Stein, Charles, A.B Maryland 

Stephenson, Frank Richard. .Maryland 

Strully, Joseph George New York 

Thomas, Robert Yates Haines.. Florida 

Thompson, Harry Goff Illinois 

♦Widby, Jesse Howard, B.S.Washington 
WiRTS, Carl Alexander. . .Pennsylvania 

Young, Alexander, A.B New York 

ZuPNiK, Howard LtESTer. .Pennsylvania 
Zuravin, Meyer Harry, B.S. .New Jersey 



88 GENERAL SUMMARY 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SESSION OF 1928-1929 

College of Agriculture 141 

College of Arts and Sciences 582 

Extension 6 

School of Dentistry 384 

College of Education 147 

Extension 116 

College of Engineering 261 

Extension 171 

Graduate School 105 

College of Home Economics 51 

School of Law 257 

School of Medicine 413 

School of Nursing 116 

School of Pharmacy 373 

Summer School, 1927, College Park 626 

Practice School 56 

Total 3,805 

Duplications 94 

Net Total 3,711 



4 



GRADUATES 



GRADUATES 1929 

GRADUATES OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

JUNE 8, 1929 



AcKERMAK^ Jacob Harold^ A.B., 

New York 
Alessi, Silvio A., Ph.G., Maryland 

Amos, Hugh, B.S., Ohio 

Anderson, Walter Anders, D.D.S., Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Bardpeld, Benjamin B., New Jersey 

Barland, Samuel, Jr., B.S., New York 
Bern hard, Robert, New York 

Birely, Morris Franklin, A.B., 

Maryland 
BoNGiORNO, Henry Domenic, Ph.G., 

New Jersey 
BOTSCH, Bernard, B.S., Ohio 

BowEN, James Poore, B.S., 

South Carolina 
Brahms, Max, B.S., New York 

Brader, Selig Leo, New Jersey 

Calas, Andres Eladio, Cuba 

Chambers, Earl LeRoy, Maryland 

Chapman, William Hardee, Maryland 
Christian, William,, Pennsylvania 

CiccONE, Arnold William, Rhode Island 
Clark, Francis Alden, B.S.. 

West Virginia 
Cohen, Herman, New Jersey 

Cohen, Paul Henry, A.B., Maryland 

Conn, Jacob Harry, A.B., Maryland 

Corsbllo, Joseph Nicholas, B.S., 

New York 
Dailey, William Paul, Pennsylvania 

Daniels, Willard Floyd, B.S., 

West Virginia 
DeBarbieri, Fred Louis, A.B,, 

Pennsylvania 
Draper, William Bateman, Maryland 
I Farbman, Meyer David, B.S., New York 
Fargo, William Russell, A.B., 

Maryland 
Fattel, Henry Charles, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Feingold, Charles Rodin, B.S., 

New York 
Fbit, Emanuel, B.S., New York 

I Fifeb, Jesse Showalter, A.B., 

Delaware 
Garbbr, Jacob S., New York 

Givner, David, A.B., Maryland 



GouLDMAN, Edwin Foster, B.S., 

Virginia 
GuiGLiA, Sascha Facchetti, New York 
Haney, John James, New Jersey 

Heck, Leroy Savin, B.S., Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Helms, Samuel Thomas, B.S., Virginia 
Holroyd, Frank Jackson, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 
Horowitz, Morris, A.B., Massachusetts 
Husted, Samuel Harlby, New Jersey 
IsERN, Rafael Angel Vilar, B.S., 

Porto Rico 
Jackson, Murray Elliot, B.S., New York 
Jacobs, Abraham, B.S., New York 

Kelly, Clyde Ernest, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Kendall, Benjamin Horton, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Knight, Walter Phillips, Pennsylvania 
Levi, Ernest, Ph.G., Maryland 

Levy, Walter Howard, New York 

Lynn, Irving, B.S., New Jersey 

Lynn, John Galloway, 4th 
Matsumara, Junichi, Hawaii 

McAndrew, Joseph Theodore, 

West Virginia 
McDowell, Roy Hendrix, A.B., 

North Carolina 
McGowan, Joseph Francis, 

Pennsylvania 
Meranski, Israel Peter, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Morgan, Isaac Joseph, B.S.. 

Pennsylvania 
Murphy, John Edward, Pennsylvania 
Neistadt, Isidore Irving, A.B., 

Maryland 
Neuman, Fqnley Frederick, A.B., 

Ohio 
Newman, Saul Charles, B.S., 

Connecticut 
NicKMAN, Emanuel Harrison, 

New Jersey 
Overton, Lewis Marvin, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Penchansky, Samuel Joseph, B.S., 

New Jersey 



90 



GRADUATES 



POBTEBFIELD, MACEICB COLEMAN, 

Maryland 
Prageb, Benjamin, B.S., New York 

Eeedeb, Paul Arlington, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Reilly, John Vincent, New Jersey 

RoBEETS, Eldbed, B.S., Maryland 

Safer, Jake Victoe, Florida 

SAFroBD, Henry Towne, Jr., Texas 

Schreiber, Morris Bernard, New York 
Schwartzbach, Saul, A.B., 

District of Columbia 
Seibel, Jack, B.S., New York 

Sbkerak R,aymond Andrew, Connecticut 
Serra, Lawrence Mario, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Sikorsky, Albert Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 
Silver, Mabel Irene, B.S., Maryland 

SoiFER, Albert Alexander, B.S., 

Maryland 
New York 
Maryland 



Solomon, Milton, B.S., 
Speicheb, Wilbur Glenn, 



Spencer, Ernest, Maryland 

Spurrier, Oliver Walter, A.B., 

Marylaad 
Staton, Leon Raphael, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Stevenson, Charles Calvert, Utah 

Sullivan, William Joseph, Rhode Island 
Tannenbaum, Morris, B.S., New York 
Taylor, Charles Vivian, A.B., Maryland 
Ullrich, Henry Franz Maryland 

Vann, Homeb King, Florida 

Vestal, Tom Fletcheb, North Carolina 
Volenick, Lee Joseph, New York 

Wallack, Charles Albert, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Ward, Hugh Walter, A.B., Maryland 

Waters, Zack James, B.S,, 

North Carolina 
Weiss, Aaron, New York 

WiLKERSON, Albert Russell, Ph.G., 

Maryland 
Yeager, George Herschbl, B.S., 

Maryland 
YuDKOFF, William, B.S., New Jersey 



The following men graduated on October 1st, 1928: 
ISEAEL Kaufman S. Zachaby Vogkl 

Honors 
University Prize Gold Medal William Russell Fabqo 

Certificates of Honor 
Lawrencb Mario Serra Samuel Thomas Helms 

Oliver Walter Spurrier Paul Henry Cohen 

Mau-rice Coleman Porterfield 



The Dr. Jose L. Hirsh Memorial Prize of $50.00 for the best work in 
Pathology during the second and third years was awarded to William 
Russell Fargo. 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship for the highest standing 
in the Freshman Class was awarded to Herbert Berger. 

The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the best work 
in Genito-Urinary Surgery during the senior year was awarded to Zack 
James Waters. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 91 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Executive Officers 
President, Dr. Alexius McGlannan — 115 W. Franklin St. 
Vice President, Dr. Elmer B. Freeman — 412 Cathedral St. 
Vice President, Dr. Aloysius W. Valentine — 610 N. Caroline Ave., Wash., D.C. 
Vice President, Dr. Wm. Wayne Babcock — 1720 Spruce St., Phila., Pa. 
Secretary, Dr. H. M. Bubert — Medical Arts Bldg. 
Assistant Secretary, Dr. T. B. Aycock — Medical Arts Bldg. 
Treasurer, Dr. M. LeRoy Lumpkin — 914 N. Charles St, 

Board of Directors 
Chairman of Board, Dr. C. R. Edwards, Medical Arts Building. 
President, Dr. Alexius McGlannan 
Secretary, Dr. Howard M. Bubert 
Assistant Secretary, Dr. T. B. Aycock 
Treasurer, Dr. M. L. Lumpkin 
2 year member, Dr. Jos. W. Holland 

2 year member, Dr. Frank S. Lynn 
1 year member, Dr. Austin Wood 

1 year member, Dr. Chas. R. Foutz 

(To keep a nucleus of 3 intact, President becomes Chairman for this year 
then two year Members each year.) 

Advisory Committee 

Dr. Wm. H. Triplett, Chairman— 1324 W. Lombard St. 

Dr. A. Ferd Reis — 24 S. Broadway 

Dr. John Evans, Medical Arts Bldg. 

Dr. Charles A. Waters— 1100 N. Charles St. 

Dr. S. Demarco — 1604 Linden Ave. 

Representative on Alumni Council, Dr. Cyrus Horine — 817 Park Ave. 

Representatives on Hospital Council 
Dr. Frank W. Kelvting — Owings Mills, Md. 
Dr. Charles W. Maxson — 827 N. Charles St. 

Trustees Students Rotating Fund 
5 year term, Dr. Wm. S. Love 2 year term. Dr. Robert L. Mitchell 

4 year term, Dr. Chas. E. Brack 1 year term, Dr. G. Milton Linthicum 

3 year term, Dr. Frank J. Kirby 

(Upon expiration all elections will be for 5 year terms. Thus 1 elected 
each year.) 

Editors Bulletin 

Dr. Emil Novak— 26 E. Preston St. 

Dr. H. M. Bubert — Medical Arts Bldg. 

Necrologist, Dr. Wm. S. Love — 836 W. North Ave. 



92 ENDOWMENT FUND 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund : 

Daniel Baker, Je., Chairman. Stuabt Janney 

Harry Adt^r, M.D. E. F. Kelly, Ph.G. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Robertson Griswold 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuating 
Its powers are limited to the expenditure of the interest derived from 
the fund, which is to be applied in the discretion of the Board for 
the benefit of the University. Contributions, donations and bequests 
are solicited from Alumni and friends. They may be made to the 
general or University Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other 
department of the University. If intended for the School of Medi- 
cine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some 
special object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, 
publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal prize, etc., 
in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. 
Attention is invited to the "Charles Frick Research Fund," already 
established in memory of that distinguished investigator. Checks 
should be made payable to J. M. H. Rowland, Treasurer, Lombard 
and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 
To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 

benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

To Endowment Fund 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the 

State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 93 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 
Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Frances M. Branley, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 
Isabel Zimmerman, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Helen Wright, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 

Supervisor of Operrating Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhel\d, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 

Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 
Grace Pearson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 
Bertha Hoffman, R.N. 

Alice Bennetpt, R.N Night Supervisor 

Jane Moffatt, R.N Supervisor — Dispensary 

LnxiE Hoke, R.N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward 

Estella Baldwin, R.N Head Nurse — Cliildren's Ward 

Helen J. Morgart, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Medical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Gertrude Conner, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Marie Pearce, R.N Head Nurse — Women's Medical 

Surgical and Gynecological Ward 

Lucy Brude, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Vada Smith, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Rhea Gerber, R.N Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Cora Mason Wilson, R.N Head Nurse — Surgical Supply Room 

Frances Leishear, R.N Head Nurse — ^Accident Room 

Mildred Croll, R.N Head Nurse — Outside Obstetrics 

Ruth Young, R.N Assistant Oustide Obstetrics 

Catherine Rodenwald, R.N Head Nurse — Prenatal Clinic 

Stella Ricketts, R.N Assistant Prenatal Clinic 



94 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy 
C. L, Davis, M.D. 

Physiology 
F. A, RiES, M.D. 

Bacteriology 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Chemistry 
Ruth F. Carb, B.S. 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 

Ruth Musser, B.A. 

W. H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Medicine 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. W. S. Love, Jr., M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. V. L. Ellicott, M.D. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D. 

Pediatrics 

C. LOBING JOSLIN, M.D. 

Psychiatry 
R. McCluby Chapman, M.D. 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

OphthalmA)logy 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Otology 
J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Surgery 
Joseph W. Holland, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology 
E. A. Loopeb, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Hugh Brent, M.D. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 96 

Orthopaedic Swrgei-y 
Robert W. Johnson, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Social Service 
Special Lectures 

STUDENTS ENROLLED, 1927-1928. 

Post-graduates 1 

Seniors 32 

Intermediates 20 

Juniors and Preparatory 49 

Total 102 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The University of Marj'land School for Nurses was established in 
the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the Uniyersity 
Hospital, coming under the same goyernment. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morn- 
ing prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 
250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of 
instruction and practice in all phases of nursing, including experi- 
ence in the operating room. 

The school offers the student nurse unusual advantages in its 
opportunity for varied experience and in its thorough curriculum 
taught by best qualified instructors and members of the Medical 
Staff of the University. 

Admission — Requirements : In order to become a candidate for 
admission to the Training School, application must be made in 
person or by letter, to the Superintendent of Nurses, An applica- 
tion by letter should be accompanied by a statement from a clergy- 
man testifying to good moral character and from a physician cer- 
tifying to sound health and unimpaired faculties. No person will 



96 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

be considered who is not in a good physical condition between the 
ages of 18 and 35. She must also show that she has a High School 
education or its equivalent. This is the minimum requirement, as 
women of superior education and culture are given preference pro- 
vided they meet the requirements in other particulars. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of 
dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation, is 
left to the decision of the Superintendent of Nurses. Misconduct, 
disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neglect of duty are 
causes for dismissal at any time by the Superintendent of Nurses, 
with the approval of the President of the University. 

Time: Students are admitted in February and September. 

Hours on Duty : During the probation term the students are on 
duty not more than six hours daily. During the Junior, Intermediate 
and Senior years the students are on eight-hour day duty, with six 
hours on Sunday and Holidays, and ten-hour night duty. The night 
duty periods are approximately five or six months during the three 
years. 

Sickness: A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill, 
all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through ill- 
ness in excess of two weeks during the three years must be made up. 
Should the authorities of the school decide that through the time 
lost the theoretical work has not been sufficiently covered to permit 
the student to continue in that year, it will be necessary for her to 
continue her work with the next class. 

Vacation : Vacations are given between June and September. 
A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the completion of 
the first year and four weeks at the completion of the second year. 

Expense: A student receives her board, lodging, and a reason- 
able amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her period 
of probation she provides her own uniforms made in accordance with 
the hospital regulations. After being accepted as a student nurse, 
she wears the uniform furnished by the hospital, and in addition 
to this is paid five dollars (|o.OO) a month. Her personal expenses 
during the course of instruction and training will depend entirely 
upon her individual habits and tastes. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 97 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 
The course of instruction covers a period of three years. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
First Term 
The Freshman Year is divided into two periods. The first term is 
the preparatory period (4 months) and the second the junior term. 
In the preparatory term the student is given practical instruc- 
tion in: 

I. The making of hospital and surgical supplies. The cost of 
hospital materials, apparatus and surgical instruments. 
II. Household economics and the preparation of foods. 
III. The hospital out-patients' department and dispensary. 
During this term the practical work is done under constant super- 
vision, and teaching is given correlatively. 

Excursions are made to markets, hygienic dairies, linen-rooms, 
laundry and store-room. 

The maximum number of hours per week in formal instruction 
divided into laboratory and lecture periods is thirty hours and 
includes courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Dietetics, Materia 
Medica, Personal Hygiene, Drugs and Solutions, Household Eco- 
nomics, Short Course in Ethics and History of Nursing. 

At the close of the first term of the Junior Y'ear the students are 
required to pass satisfactorily both the written and oral tests, and 
failure to do so will be sufficient reason to terminate the course at 
this point. 

SUBSEQUENT COURSE 

The course of instruction, in addition to the probationary period, 
occupies two and one-half years, and students are not accepted 
for a shorter period. 

After entering the wards, the students are constantly engaged in 
practical work under the immediate supervision and direction of the 
head nurses and instructors. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Second Term 

During this period the students receive theoretical instruction in 
Massage, Bacteriology, General Surgery and Introductory Medicine. 
Practical instruction is received in the male and female, medical, 
surgical, and children's wards. 



98 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

JUNIOR YEAR 

During this period the theoretical instruction includes Pediatrics, 
General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics, Gynecology and 
Orthopaedics. The practical work provides experience in the nursing 
of obstetrical and gynecological patients, in the operating-rooms and 
the out-patient department. 

SENIOR YEAR 

During this period the student receives short courses of lectures 
on subjects of special interest. This includes a consideration of the 
work of institutions of public and private charities, of settlements, 
and various branches of professional work in nursing. 

Experience is given in executive and administrative work to those 
showing exceptional ability in the Senior Year. With these students 
conferences are held on administration and teaching problems. 

Examinations — Which are both written and oral — include prac- 
tical tests, and the standing of the student is based upon the general 
character of work throughout the years, as well as the results of the 
examinations. Students must pass all subjects before entering upon 
the work of the following year. 

Gradl'ation : The diploma of the School will be awarded to those 
who have completed satisfactorily the full term of three years and 
have passed successfully the final examinations. 

ScHOLARSHirs : One scholarship has been (established by the 
Alumnae of the Training School. It entitles a nurse to a six weeks' 
course at Teachers' College, New York. This scholarship is awarded 
at the close of the third year to the student whose work has been of 
the highest excellence, and who desires to pursue post-graduate study 
and special work. There is a second prize of fifty dollars, known as 
the Elizabeth Collins Lee prize, which is awarded at the close of the 
third year to the student whose work has been of the second highest 
excellence. A third prize of fifty dollars, known as the Edwin & 
Leander M. Zimmerman prize, which is also awarded at the close 
of the third year to the student whose practical work has been out- 
standing and who has displayed the greatest interest and sympathy 
for the patients. 

An Alumnae Pin is presented by the Women's Auxiliary Board 
to the student who at the completion of three years shows excep- 
tional executive ability. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 99 

Five-Year Program 

In addition to tlie regular three-year course of training the University offers 
a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), consisting of 68 
semester hours, as shown on page 94 of the University Catalogue, are spent 
in the College of Arts and Sciences of the University, during which period the 
student has an introduction to the general cultural subjects which are con- 
sidered fundamental in any college training. At least the latter of these 
two years must be spent in residence at College Park in order that the student 
may have her share in the social and cultural activities of college life. The 
last three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore or in the 
Training School of University Hospital, which is affiliated with the School of 
Medicine of the University. In the fifth year of the combined program certain 
elective courses such as Public Health Nursing, Nursing Education, Practical 
Sociology, and Educational Psychology are arranged. 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1929 

Eva Mae Bradbuen North Carolina Corinne Bennett Miller Maryland 

Gertrude Nelson Conner Maryland Edith Eugenia Morgan. . .North CaioJiua 

Mildred M, Coulter North Carolina Milbrey Catherine Neikirk. . .Maryland 

Grace Eleanor Dick Maryland Margaret Nelson Maryland 

Grace Mae Emmert. .District of Columhia Martha Rebecca Pifer Virginia 

Edna Alyce Esterly Maryland Mildred Nancy Rankin. .North Carolina 

Freda Gertrude Fazenbaker. . .Maryland Emma Elizabeth Roth Maryland 

LiDA Jane Fite Pennsylvania Mildred Mae Shipley Maryland 

Margaret Milton Fox Maryland Vesta Lillian Swartz Virginia 

Christina Baird Gillies, Grace Liden Thawley Maryland 

Jamaica, B. W. I. Dena Virginia Valaco Maryland 

Eleanoee Editha Goldsborough, Alberta Lillian Victor Maryland 

West Virginia Larue Koontz Wetzel Maryland 

Hattib G. Goodman Maryland Hilda Dale Willis North Carolina 

Daisymae Hastings Maryland Kathryn Elizabeth Wright. . .Maryland 

Evelyn C. Haddox West Virginia Ruth Anna Young Maryland 

Gertrude C. McLaughlin. .West Virginia Evelyn Byrd Zapf Maryland 



MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 
and incorporated in 1901. It has developed the art of the profession 
according to the high standard requisite to qualify for Registered 
Nurse. 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was organized and incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 1899, and has 
operated successfully for a quarter of a century. 



100 SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Requirements for Admission. 

A candidate desiring to enter the School of Nursing should apply 
to the Superintendent of Nurses by letter or in person at least six 
weeks before the entrance date. It is preferred that she apply in 
person accompanied by her mother or guardian. If a personal inter- 
view is not possible, a written application may be submitted. 
Age, 

Candidates should be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five 
years. 
Physique. 

Applicants should be of average height and good physique. Teeth 
and eyes should be attended to before entering the School, and 
tonsils removed if not in good condition. Every applicant is required 
to send in a certificate of health by her family physician. A physical 
examination is also made by the school physician during the pre- 
liminary period. 

Education. 

Applicants for admission should present at least high school cer- 
tificate of graduation or its equivalent in educational values. The 
credits of preliminary education are fully accounted and the nurse 
who is the better qualified finds such a foundation more to her advan- 
tage as she progresses through the years of study. 
Calendar. 

Students are admitted September 1st and February 1st. 
Length of Course. 

The course of instruction covers three years. It is divided into a 
preliminary term of four months, a freshman term of eight months, 
a junior term of one year, and a senior term of one year. 
Conditions of Acceptance. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness for the 
work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing a student at the 
end of the term of probation or during its course. She may also, 
with the approval of the faculty, terminate the connection of a stu- 
dent with the School in any justifiable instance. At the end of the 
preliminary period, if the student's health, general education, and 
natural aptitude prove satisfactory to the Director of the School 
and the Sister Superior, she shall be appointed for enrollment as a 
student nurse. 



SCHOOLS OF NURSING 101 

Expenses. 

An admission fee of fifty dollars is required from all students. 
This covers the cost of uniforms and books required during the pre- 
liminary course. 

Should the student for any reason leave the school before com- 
pleting the course, this fee will not be returned, nor may she take 
with her any part of the equipment. 

After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School of Nursing 
proper. They receive ten dollars per month to help defray incidental 
expenses No compensation is given, the education received being 
considered suflScient return for service rendered. Board, laundry, 
etc., are furnished by the institution. 

Four weeks before admission candidates should forward the fifty- 
dollar entrance fee, and measurements for uniforms and aprons, 
which will be in readiness upon their arrival. No orders will be 
considered until this fee is received. 

Uniform Equipment. 

After acceptance students are required to wear the uniform of the 
School. They are not permitted to appear on the street awa